Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

What's the Big Idea?: How to Win with Outrageous Ideas (That Sell!) Paperback – January 1, 1993


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$69.95 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: That Sell!
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (January 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452269385
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452269385
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #954,903 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Famous adman Lois (George, Be Careful, 1972, also coauthored with Pitts), currently head honcho of the Lois/GGK agency, hawks his wares with all the insistence of a rock star bawling, ``I want my MTV'' (a campaign for which he proudly takes the rap). It's Lois's thesis that great advertising requires one ``big idea.'' This is a book about advertising, all right, but don't look for much practical instruction--unless it's this: To be as successful as Lois has been, simply be a genius like Lois. Unstinting in his own praise, Lois proudly recounts each of his many campaigns as ``an extraordinary tour de force,'' a ``brilliant strategy,'' ``skillful,'' and so forth ad nauseam. It's enough to make Muhammad Ali blush. Read about how Lois saved cable TV, the airline industry, Xerox, the Greek tourist business, The New York Herald Tribune, and Dilly Beans. ``Hip'' and ``sassy,'' the ``crazy Greek'' (as he likes to characterize himself) claims it was he who sold a Nazi car (Volkswagen) to New York Jews and kept USA Today on the stands. And don't forget those wonderful Esquire covers. His way of asserting a proposition: ``If you don't agree it's possible, stop reading.'' There are a few anecdotes, but nothing without the headliner Lois. Strangely, he becomes almost engaging in his single-minded devotion to self. In his first few pages, Lois offers a ``distinct break-away from the David Ogilvy `school' of advertising.'' Indeed, he seems to have an attitude about ``the reigning magistrate,'' Ogilvy. It's interesting to note, then, that early in Ogilvy on Advertising (1983), the magistrate asks, in bold-face type (you guessed it): ``What's the big idea?'' An incredibly immodest, modestly credible promotion by a durable ``creative'' huckster, perhaps more revealing than intended. -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. V. Polkinghorne on May 15, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book will be an ispiration to anyone interested in making truly great advertising - that works!. No, it's not a 'how-to' guide in the purest sense, but if you have a clue, this book is amazing. Inspirational stories of the creation, selling and making of some the great campaigns on the 20th century, and an insight into the mind of the one of the best Art Directors of all time. Get this book if you have a passion for advertising and want to learn more, or if you just like a well written inspirational read. You should also look up 'The Art of Advertising" by Lois.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Prowell on July 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
George Lois is rightfully an advertising legend, but anyone hoping to learn how to find the "big idea" from this book will probably be disappointed. The book is mostly a series of ad biz reminiscences, in which Lois talks about what a crazy, clever fellow he is. As a historical overview of 50s, 60s and 70s advertising, it's interesting -- but for a better "how to" book, I'd recommend "Hey Whipple Squeeze This" by Luke Sullivan or "Cutting Edge Advertising" by Jim Aitchison instead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
I read this book a few years back while in college. While some of the mechanics of the industry at that time are a little dates, it doesn't harm this one iota. Lois's voice, attitude, and vast experience as a creative in the ad industry are what you truly learn from. His concept of the "Big Idea" as a stepping stone to building a successful campaign is as correct today as it was in the early 90s (when this book was written).

I would recommend this to anyone who wants to enter the ad industry. It will not only give you a great education but provide you with the enthusiasm for your work that Mr. Lois has had for decades.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By M. C Purdy on July 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover
great book from the great George Lois
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search