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The What's Happening to My Body? Book for Boys: A Growing Up Guide for Parents and Sons Paperback – December 1, 1987


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 251 pages
  • Publisher: Newmarket Pr (December 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0937858994
  • ISBN-13: 978-0937858998
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,334,991 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Hanging Low, Keeping Cool," "A Hairy Question," "Feeling Private/Feeling Guilty," "You Don't See Any Blind, Crazy Morons Around Here, Do Ya?"

Can you guess what all these chapter titles are about? Give you a hint: everything you ever wanted to know about (but were afraid to ask)... You got it, boys and puberty! Author Lynda Madaras and her daughter Area Madaras have expanded and updated their sensitive, detailed, often witty guide for boys on the cusp of adolescence. To help boys realize they are not alone in their concerns about masturbation, body hair, growth spurts (or lack thereof), female puberty, voice changes, perspiration, shaving, and sexuality, this classic guide is written in a down-to-earth, nonjudgmental style and filled with answers to the many questions boys have as their bodies begin the transformation into adulthood. As a result of thousands of reader letters over the years, as well as the ever growing body of information about puberty in boys, the third edition has been revised to include more detailed discussion of penis size (the authors get more questions about penis size than all other topics combined), updated information on acne treatment, expanded sections on eating right, exercise, steroid abuse, and weight training, and important facts about STDs, AIDS, and birth control. Filled with anecdotes, illustrations, and diagrams, the guide is designed with the understanding that some boys and parents will want to read it together, while others will want to pore over it on their own. Either way, this resource will prove to be incredibly useful for boys and their parents over these strange, exciting years. The companion volume for girls, What's Happening to My Body? Book for Girls is a must-read as well. (Ages 8 to 15) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Reviewed with Lynda Madaras' The What's Happening to My Body? Book for Girls.

Gr. 4-8. In these new editions of her classic guides, Madaras has made significant changes to reflect the younger age at which children are now reaching puberty. She has cut out the chapters about sex, birth control, pregnancy, and STDs, although she includes a rich appendix of resources on these topics. Mostly, the books concentrate on the physical changes that occur during puberty, with new chapters designed to serve as "owners manuals": in Boys, there's new information about shaving and answers to questions about penis size; in Girls, there's an expanded "all about having periods" section. As in the previous editions, the tone is matter-of-fact and comforting, and Madaras has further simplified the sentence structure and word choices, in some cases perhaps too much; the section on sexual harassment, for example, is somewhat vague and slightly unfocused. Overall, however, these are excellent new editions that make fine resources even more accessible to a young audience. Sure to encourage dialogue between kids and parents. Gillian Engberg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Excellent book, very well written.
Ana
A very good book that has answers to questions that some parents have a hard time explaining and talking about.
V. E. Pushchak
I read this book before giving it to my son.
Theresa Gutierrez

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

87 of 88 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
My parents bought this book for me when I was becoming a teenager, and it helped a lot. Reading the book was a lot more comfortable than talking with my parents would have been. The personal ancedotes scattered throughout help to make the reader feel "normal". I'd recommend this to any parent, or just a kid who's curious.
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193 of 208 people found the following review helpful By Steve on December 22, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought the third edition of this book hoping it would be something my ten year old son could refer to if he has questions he is embarassed to talk about. The book is very factual without being overly clinical, but some of the topics discussed at lenght are more suited for older teens. The exhaustive list of slang names for male and female body parts really isn't necessary -- adolescent boys seem to do well in that department all by themselves! I also feel that the chapter "Girls and Puberty" has far more detail than a pre-teen boy needs or can handle. The book would be much better if it were presented in a loose-leaf format so I could give my son the sections he is able to handle at his age. I also wonder why the author has removed chapters on the important topics of birth control and STD's, which she says were in her previous edition. The book will certainly help me in my talks with my son, but I'm still looking for the right book for him to read on his own.
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59 of 61 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
I had no problem teaching my girls about the birds and the bees. But when it came time to talk to my son about erections, wet-dreams, etc. I was lost. I read this book first to learn all the stuff I didn't know about boys development and then shared it with my son when he was ready. Gives you a good basis for conversation. Another book I recently read that you'll find really helpful: Perfect Parenting (Dictionary of 1000 Parenting Tips) by Elizabeth Pantley
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281 of 311 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was looking for a book for my stepson, (he's almost 12) and noticed that this book received a lot of positive reviews- so thought I'd try it. I just wanted a book that my wife and I could read first; turn him loose with it on his own, then talk with him afterwards about what he thought of it. Unfortunately, we won't be giving it to him, and here's why:
This book doesn't really relate to 8 to 15 yr old boys- on their own level. The words are way too big, and the book's approach is way too clinical. I remember being a teenagage boy, and I think it's safe to say that if you try to work words like "bulbourethral glands" or "pre-ejaculatory fluid" into the conversation- you lose 'em REAL fast. No kid would EVER sit around reading it! Then about every 10th page, you'd find a crude drawing of everything from simply naked boys; to cross-sections of penises, breasts, and vaginas. It ranged from clinical to slightly creepy, and just put yourself in the shoes of a teenage boy: you may want to know what it feels like to touch a female breast, but cross-sections of milk ducts can be a little scary to think about. And really- who actually needs an arrow pointing to a "nipple", in order to know what (or where) it is? "Oh THAT's a nipple! How illuminating! Can't WAIT to get my hands on that uterine lining"!:-) Which brings me to my main complaint about the book: We searched cover to cover, but found NO sense of humor in the approach- and I believe that if you want to help teenage boys to be comfortable about the topic of sexuality - you need that. Let's just say that if you want to give your teenage boy a book that he'll actually read, enjoy,and benefit from - Keep looking.
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47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Nora on November 27, 1998
Format: Hardcover
As a mother of boys coming up to teen-age, I scoured the shelves for the appropriate 'Birds and Bees' book and chose this one. I've read it cover to cover and found nothing to object to. It presents all the facts you could need, with a calm, reassuring tone, but as important, it promotes an attitude of respect for self and others in the confusing area of teen sexuality.
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43 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
I initially borrowed an earlier edition of this book to read, as my son is 11 years old. My husband is very uncomfortable in discussing puberty with his son, and even with me. He was a very late bloomer and therefore, not a great resource on when things may occur or start to occur in my son. I read the book and then sat down one night with my son. As we sat on the couch, I read the book to him, as he looked on. We laughed some, we talked some, we giggled some, we learned a lot. His father came in during our conversation and sat down. Dad then was able to become part of a discussion that had already started and did not have to bring up himself. This worked great for our
family. I found humor, so did my son. It did have a lot of slang terms, but every child may not know exactly what they mean, and this way, my son now does and can be better educated in the slang and in the correct names. Too graphic? I do not thinks so, there were certainly some chapters we did not address
at this time, as they are more appropriate for another (older) time. The book is around the house so he can read it as he wants, there is nothing in the book that I do not want him to know. Very educational for me as well as I grew up in a family of females and therefore had no idea at what ages certain things happened to boys. My son then was able to talk to me about some of the changes that were happening to him. He then had other questions? I was able to discuss these questions with him intelligently and comfortable in my facts. He was very nervous about going through puberty, now he is not. I believe this a book for the family, not just to be handed to the child. Every child has questions that need to be answered, this book has most of the answers. I found it nonjudgemental.
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