What's the best way to clean these skillets?
asked by Sharon Vaknin on November 30, 2012
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I am in my 70's and wash my iron cook wear like my grandmother did. After scraping with a spoon or spatula, I use a rough surface but non-scratchy scrub pad or cloth (I like the nylon knit squares) and water, sometimes with a very very small amount of dish soap, and the pan comes clean. Then I spray a dab of vegetable oil on and rub it around with my fingertips. I then heat the pan on the stove until the oil smokes and turn it off. After it cools I store it with a napkin in the pan between it any other pans. It's easy care. Essentially you have a non-stick surface pan that lasts forever. It is much "greener" than the modern light weight pans with non-stick coatings (these chip off into your food and stop working with the slightest scratch or overheating).
Cyntha J. Resare answered on November 30, 2012
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I use a Scotch Brite Non-Scratch scrub sponge, as soon after I'm done using the pan. I just run hot water, hold the pan in the sink (with a oven glove!) and clean off the pan. This works well, as no buildup deposits. I don't use soap. as the care instructions warn. This works great. Then, I let the pan cool, dry it off, and immediately treat the pan with a little vegetable oil. Fantastical results.
Steve S. answered on November 30, 2012
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While skillet is still warm, dump in some kosher salt. Scrub under running water with a sponge or stiff brush. Rinse. Sometimes I need to repeat until the salt stays white (esp true if I cooked up bacon). Dry completely and immediately. Use a little bit of grapeseed oil to protect the pan. You don't want to use soap, steel wool, or put the pan in the dishwasher as it will strip the pan's seasoning. You also don't want to soak the pan in water because the pan will rust.
Mickey answered on November 30, 2012
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I second what many others have said: no soap. Just scrub food off when it is still warm. Then I spray it with cooking oil to keep working at the seasoning.
Carey Hubbell answered on November 30, 2012
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A
Steel wool is fine. I use a sponge with a scotch Brite side but WITHOUT soap. You need to leave the oil on the skillet. If it is very dirty or has been buildup you can heat it up a little and srub it. There are also plastic scrapers that are sold on Amazon that are very handy.
John R. Vasquez answered on November 30, 2012
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I agree with the lady in her 70s, as I'm just about the same age. I've had the same cast iron pan for years. My grandmother used them and so did my mother. Taking care of cast iron is easy. Don't do anything to remove the "seasoning" and if you do, it's not a disaster, you just have to re-season it which is easy. To avoid removing the seasoning: Scrape any stuck on bits from pan using a metal spatula while still at the stove. Carry to sink and under hot water, scrub the pan with a good stiff brush, a sturdy plastic or nylon scratcher pad, a metal scratcher pat without soap in it such as a non soaped steel wool, or one of the handy little plastic scrapers Lodge pans makes. I use the brush Lodge makes and it's here on Amazon. If you need an abrasive, use a small handful of coarse salt with the scrubbing implement. Rinse very well and let water drain from pan. Place damp pan on hot burner long enough to turn totally dry. Tun off the heat and add 2-5 drops olive oil or any other oil you like. Using a bunched up half sheet of paper towel, rub this oil over inside bottom and sides of pan taking care to not touch surface with bare hands as it's still pretty hot. You are done. If you stack other pans inside your cast iron, spread the paper towel you just used in the cast iron pan to protect it's finish.
Midwest Lady answered on March 26, 2014
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My experience (I've used iron skillets for 50 years) has been that using soap ruins the seasoning. I use hot water and a kitchen brush or sponge with the green scrubbing surface on one side). Baking soda or salt are excellent to use to clean. NEVER soak the cast iron in water--it rusts! In the past, I used shortening or vegetable oils for frying or seasoning my skillets, but I have found that coconut oil is greatly superior to use in my skillets. It handles high heat well and does a superior job seasoning the skillets and creating a non-stick surface (grapeseed or peanut oil are also good).
Purple Violets answered on June 21, 2014
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If its something stuck on I will scrub with a scouring pad or heat it up with some water in it and it'll come off. Then once dry oil it up and I store it in my stove.
Cool Guy OTP answered on November 30, 2012
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Normally you just use a plastic scraper to remove any stuck food and then use a paper towel to wiper clean, apply fresh veg. oil, then wiping off the excess. Lodge recommends that you do not wash with soap, if you feel you must use soap, then you will need to re-season the item. Full instructions are on Lodge's web site along with receipes
LaSmooz answered on December 2, 2012
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Scrub with water and dry thoroughly, then re-season with vegetable oil. :)
phynyx answered on November 30, 2012
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