Start reading Wheelmen on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Add Audible Narration

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available
 

Wheelmen: Lance Armstrong, the Tour de France, and the Greatest Sports Conspiracy Ever [Kindle Edition]

Reed Albergotti , Vanessa O'Connell
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (320 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $18.00
Kindle Price: $7.99
You Save: $10.01 (56%)
Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Narration

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $12.99 when you buy the Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $7.99  
Hardcover $18.81  
Paperback $13.88  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $20.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
Notable New Titles in Business & Money
Browse a selection of featured new business & money titles.

Book Description

The sensational New York Times bestselling in-depth look at Lance Armstrong’s doping scandal, the phenomenal business success built on the back of fraud, and the greatest conspiracy in the history of sports. Now with a new afterword.

Lance Armstrong won a record-smashing seven Tours de France after staring down cancer, and in the process became an international symbol of resilience and courage. In a sport constantly dogged by blood-doping scandals, he seemed above the fray. Then, in January 2013, the legend imploded. He admitted doping during the Tours and, in an interview with Oprah, described his "mythic, perfect story" as "one big lie." But his admission raised more questions than it answered—because he didn’t say who had helped him dope or how he skillfully avoided getting caught.

The Wall Street Journal reporters Reed Albergotti and Vanessa O’Connell broke the news at every turn. In Wheelmen they reveal the broader story of how Armstrong and his supporters used money, power, and cutting-edge science to conquer the world’s most difficult race. Wheelmen introduces U.S. Postal Service Team owner Thom Weisel, who in a brazen power play ousted USA Cycling’s top leadership and gained control of the sport in the United States, ensuring Armstrong’s dominance. Meanwhile, sponsors fought over contracts with Armstrong as the entire sport of cycling began to benefit from the "Lance effect." What had been a quirky, working-class hobby became the pastime of the Masters of the Universe set.

Wheelmen offers a riveting look at what happens when enigmatic genius breaks loose from the strictures of morality. It reveals the competitiveness and ingenuity that sparked blood-doping as an accepted practice, and shows how the Americans methodically constructed an international operation of spies and revolutionary technology to reach the top. It went on to become a New York Times Bestseller, a Wall Street Journal Business Bestseller, and win numerous awards, including a Gold Medal for the Axiom Business Book Awards. At last exposing the truth about Armstrong and American cycling, Wheelmen paints a living portrait of what is, without question, the greatest conspiracy in the history of sports.






Editorial Reviews

Review

"Authoritative and overflows with forceful details….Albergotti and O'Connell write like insiders looking out."
Los Angeles Times

"A chilling tale, and many of the anecdotes Albergotti and O’Connell collected sound like they were actually crafted in a TV-drama writers’ room."
The Atlantic

"Reed Albergotti and Vanessa O’Connell uncovered plenty more shocking details about the full extent of Armstrong’s drug use as well as the many people and institutions that helped him."
The Daily Beast

"The most comprehensive book on the subject … a colorful and thorough retelling."
USA Today

"Captivating . . . a level-headed view of the culture and business of cycling."
The Economist

"The book is rich in details, facts, and figures."
Velo News

"Wheelmen is all the truth-and-reconciliation the sport needs."
The Philadelphia Review of Books
 
"The only thing ever missing was the truth. In Wheelmen, we get it."
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

"A detailed account of Armstrong's eventual descent into disgrace."
The Guardian (UK)
 
"The definitive book on Armstrong."
The Montreal Gazette

About the Author

Reed Albergotti is a reporter covering the technology industry in The Wall Street Journal's San Francisco bureau. He is also the son of a fanatic amateur cyclist who served as the director of cycling competition in the 1984 Olympics. An accomplished bike racer himself, Reed speaks the sport’s odd language.

Vanessa O'Connell, an award-winning reporter at The Wall Street Journal for eighteen years, has covered tobacco, alcohol, guns, insider trading, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. She has a knack for exposing the nature of corporate America and how it sometimes manipulates the score in making its money.

Product Details

  • File Size: 6282 KB
  • Print Length: 385 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1592408486
  • Publisher: Gotham Books; Reprint edition (October 15, 2013)
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C1N92YY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,450 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
58 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fame, Fortune and Deceit! October 19, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
As a sports fan but not really a biking fan, I followed Armstrong with admiration and pride. How could you not. But I obviuosly did not appreciate the magnitude of his repeated success in the Tour de France and ultimately the PR apparatus and it's enablers had me fooled like millions of others. This book explains why we were all suckers. I can't think of another sport that this con could have been pulled off in such a systematic and morally void manner at all levels. I don't know what to think of Armstrong. It's hard to square his positives and negatives, as an incredibly dedicated super athlete, inspirational cancer surviver, fundraiser and by account good father versus the pathological cheat, narcistic playboy and ruthless protector of his reputation, including his willingness to crush his detractors. Even sympathetic co-conspirator Floyd Landis was responsible for his own fall and you could say that the sport, the sponsors and participants deserved their reckoning. The author is right to show that money was the linchpin of this tale of deceit, but vanity and ego are a close second. The author did his homework and the story flows well from chapter to chapter. There are so many characters it's hard to keep track but it doesn't take your eye off the real subject. Everyone in the college or pro level of any sport in any capacity, sponser, coach, etc, should read this book. It's a sad story all around.
Was this review helpful to you?
69 of 83 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
This is an amazing period for cycling fans who followed the ascendance of Lance Armstrong and Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis in the 1990s and 2000s and marveled as they were discredited and fell from grace, condemned as cheaters. For those reading on the topic, the first great text is the USADA's own report on cheating at the U.S. Postal team. It's vivid, detailed, shocking (or was when it was released), and freely available online. Then came Tyler Hamilton's book, The Secret Race, which describes his own decision to cheat and how it all fell apart. If you are going to read only one book on this topic, Hamilton's is so far the best. Now we get Wheelmen, by two reporters from the Wall Street Journal. The last in this round will probably be Cycle of Lies: The Fall of Lance Armstrong by Juliet Mancur of the New York Times. That one comes out next year.

These books overlap each other, and a reader might reasonably wonder whether or not it makes sense to read more than one. For me, the answer is very much yes. The USADA report is amazing as a primary source. Hamilton's book gives additional, vivid detail including an extended discussion of how and why great riders chose to cheat, and what it felt like when they did. It also provides some color on Thomas Wiesel, Chris Carmichael, and other players in the doping story who were not discussed in the USADA report because they weren't directly involved. Wheelmen, by contrast, purports to be about the "business" of Lance Armstrong and his doping conspiracy.

What's good? Lots of research, very strong conclusions.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
52 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars About more than Lance Armstrong October 15, 2013
Format:Hardcover
I read this book and found it to be a completely gripping and fascinating story. At this point whether Lance did it or didn't is well known, but how he did it, how he got away with it and the inner circle that helped him perpetrate it, are revealed in great detail here. A portrait of Armstrong emerges that is more complex than previously established but what really grabbed me was the conspiracy narrative.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Simply stated, this is an absolutely terrific book that reads more like a novel than non-fiction.

For those who think they know the story I think that you will be surprised. My reaction to this book is the same as to the Steve Jobs biography written by Walter Issacson, which my mother gave me as a gift about a year ago. I was a little concerned when I got it because I thought I knew enough about Jobs, Apple, PC industry history etc. for it to not be interesting. Of course, I was wrong because Issacson tells us all a lot of things that we didn't know about the man. In that regard, this book is similar in that there is much more depth and breadth to this story than I ever knew. I will give the reviewers who claim they learned nothing new the benefit of the doubt, but unless they were somewhere part of the inner workings of the cycling world in a profound way, it is hard to believe that this could be possible.

The authors piece together the history of this "conspiracy" by starting at the beginning and introducing the main characters that get the ball rolling. What is surprising is how the characters change but the "character" of Lance Armstrong really doesn't as his career ascends. From living here in Texas I knew to some degree what a jerk Armstrong was - anybody paying attention could tell that he was as ruthless as a mob boss in trying intimidate people who were working with the investigators responsible for his case based on the things that came out over the last couple of years.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Truth
Without spinning the readers wheels, the authors gave a concise historical time line of events as they unfolded. Read more
Published 5 days ago by Jodie Roseberg
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!
Revealing. And disappointing at the same time. Knew he was doping. Many cyclist were doing this. But the persistent denying when he had a choice to reveal but didn't act was... Read more
Published 9 days ago by Thomas
3.0 out of 5 stars A sad story overall for those who love cycling
Generally well written and an engaging version of both doping in cycling and Armstrong's role in enforcing a cover-up. A sad story overall for those who love cycling.
Published 9 days ago by Jeff
4.0 out of 5 stars Peel away the layers of the doping onion
A very informative book, but I found the last third to be a bit tedious to read. There is an impressive amount of research that went into the writing of this book. Read more
Published 11 days ago by Willem Vanderwerff
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
exposed the the real truth behind the wins. what a fraud
Published 14 days ago by james halpin
4.0 out of 5 stars What a story.
Hard to come to grips with it all after being such an avid supporter of Armstrong. I hate knowing it was all a lie.
Published 16 days ago by Steve Mazzella
4.0 out of 5 stars Lance The Loser
This is the detailed story of Lance Armstrong and, as other noted, his web of cheating, lies and disgrace. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Ling Kear
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books about the the history of doping in cycling!
I bought this book but did not expect the depth it went into this book delves into the history of doping going back before the 1980 Olympics and settles on Lance and the deceptions... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Peter A. Wicker
5.0 out of 5 stars The better book to buy and read about Lance Armstrong's cheating
Between Wheelmen and Cycle of Lies, I like Wheelmen much better. I think the authors are much more methodical in their approach to why Lance Armstrong cheated and those... Read more
Published 1 month ago by D.Landon.Felix
4.0 out of 5 stars A professional sport perspective- when big money is the focus
Good perspective of the sport, it's recent history in US, and the details of the Armstrong case. I liked the details of the riding-racing events and back story provided for each... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Bonnie J Genter
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category