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When China Rules The World: The Rise Of The Middle Kingdom And The End Of The Western World Paperback – International Edition, March 27, 2012


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Editorial Reviews

Review

By far the best book on China to have been published in many years, and one of the most important inquiries into the nature of modernisation. Jacques's comprehensive and richly detailed analysis will be an indispensable resource for anyone who wants to understand contemporary China -- John Gray New Statesman Provocative ... stimulating ... full of bold but credible predictions ... I suspect it will long be remembered for its foresight and insight -- Michael Rank Guardian This important book, deeply considered, full of historical understanding and realism, is about more than China. It is about a twenty-first-century world no longer modelled on and shaped by North Atlantic power, ideas and assumptions. I suspect it will be highly influential -- Eric Hobsbawm Jacques's book will provoke argument and is a tour de force across a host of disciplines -- Mary Dejevsky The Independent [An] exhaustive, incisive exploration of possibilities that many people have barely begun to contemplate about a future dominated by China. ... [Jacques] has written a work of considerable erudition, with provocative and often counterintuitive speculations about one of the most important questions facing the world today. And he could hardly have known, when he set out to write it, that events would so accelerate the trends he was analyzing. -- Joseph Kahn The New York Times Book Review A very forcefully written, lively book that is full of provocations and predictions -- Fareed Zakaria GPS, CNN [A] compelling and thought-provoking analysis of global trends... Jacques is a superb explainer of history and economics, tracing broad trends with insight and skill -- Seth Faison The Washington Post The West hopes that wealth, globalization and political integration will turn China into a gentle giant... But Jacques says that this is a delusion. Time will not make China more Western; it will make the West, and the world, more Chinese The Economist

About the Author

Martin Jacques is one of Britain's foremost public intellectuals. A Visiting Senior Research Fellow at IDEAS, the London School of Economics' centre for diplomacy and grand strategy, a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, and a Fellow of the Transatlantic Academy, Washington DC, Martin Jacques is widely respected as a leading global expert on what could prove to be the most important geopolitical event of the past 200 years: the rise of China. He was editor of Marxism Today from 1977 until the journal's closure in 1991, and has also worked as deputy editor of The Independent. He has been a columnist for the Times, the Guardian, the Observer, and the New Statesman, as well as writing for international publications such as the Financial Times, Economist, New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Daily Beast, Volkskrant, Corriere della Sera, L'Unita, South China Morning Post, and Folha Des Paulo.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin UK; 2nd Revised edition edition (March 27, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140276041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140276046
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 1.6 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,108,415 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Martin Jacques is one of Britain's foremost public intellectuals. A Visiting Senior Research Fellow at IDEAS, the London School of Economics' centre for diplomacy and grand strategy, a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, and a Fellow of the Transatlantic Academy, Washington DC, Martin Jacques is widely respected as a leading global expert on what could prove to be the most important geopolitical event of the past 200 years: the rise of China.

Born in Coventry in 1945, Martin Jacques earned a first class honours degree in Economics at Manchester University, followed by a masters degree, and then a PhD from Cambridge University. He subsequently held a lectureship in the Department of Economic and Social History at Bristol University.

In 1977, he became editor of Marxism Today, a post he held for fourteen years until the journal's closure in 1991, transforming what was an obscure and dull publication into a the most influential political magazine in Britain. In the early 1990, Jacques co-founded the think-tank Demos, and worked as deputy editor of The Independent. He has been a columnist for the Times, the Sunday Times, the Guardian, the Observer, and the New Statesman, as well as writing for many newspapers and magazines worldwide, including Financial Times, Economist, New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Daily Beast, New Republic, Volkskrant, Corriere della Sera, L'Unita, Il Mondo, Süddeutsche Zeitung, South China Morning Post, and Folha Des Paulo.

He has made many television programs for the BBC, including writing and presenting Italy on Trial (1993), The Incredible Shrinking Politicians (1993), a two-part series on The End of the Western World (1996) and Proud to be Chinese (1998).

In recent years Martin Jacques has worked as a Visiting Professor at Renmin University, Beijing, a Senior Visiting Fellow at the University of Singapore,a Visiting Research Fellow at the Asia Research Centre at the London School of Economics, and a Visiting Professor at both Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, and at the International Centre for Chinese Studies at Aichi University in Nagoya.

Customer Reviews

Great eye opening book to undestand the roots of asian culture.
Fabian
With respect to the author's fine efforts, I do not believe that one can be discussed without discussing the other.
Herbert L Calhoun
This is a must read for all students and anyone who ever thinks about the future.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on July 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Martin Jacques' "When China Rules The World" carries a provocative title, but it should not be a surprise. Anyone can see this outcome coming by simply projecting economic growth in the U.S. and China at roughly their current rates; Goldman Sachs gave such conclusions credibility in 2007 when it concluded that China would surpass U.S. GDP in 2027, and double it by 2050. Jacques' book suffers not from an overly wild imagination, but from taking entirely too long to get this already obvious conclusion, and then not exploring enough about what that means for either Britain (his nation) or the U.S.A.

Far too much of "When China Rules The World" is taken up by a detailed historical summary and analysis of China's 5,000-some year history - to establish that it is not prone to colonizing other parts of the world, values unity among its people, and that its predominantly Han 'nationality' of people are becoming increasingly smug (racist?) as China's economic power grows. Jacques could have shortened this material enormously by simply pointing out that the key to China's recent growth has been the pragmatic orientation of its leaders. Obviously, economic growth has been their #1 objective since Mao's death, and public announcements communicated that the military would have to take a back seat. The late Premier Deng Xiaoping demonstrated this pragmatic focus when - despite being Mao's #2 and having been purged twice for not being a strong-enough Communist, he turned the nation's direction around after Mao's death. At the time, Deng explained his lack of commitment to ideology or history as follows: "I don't care if it's a white cat or a black cat. It's a good cat so long as it catches mice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rybeck on February 24, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The writer paints with a very broad brush. His idea that China and Chinese people should be understood from a civilisational paradigm rather than a nation state paradigm is interesting. He argues that China is a civilsation behaving like a state. To appreciate what this means, think back to the ancient Greek states which were all members of a single advanced Hellenistic civilisation, but were hopelessly, and ultimately fatally, divided. China, like the ancient Greek states, once consisted of numerous warring states sharing a single civilisation, but over time these warring states managed somehow to fuse into a single state, with a homogenous sense of race and culture, which survived into the present day. The author argues that this civilisational state model gives the Chinese state a unique vitality - imagine, for example, what kind of power Greece would have become if the brief unity which it achieved during the Persian wars and Alexander the Great had been sustained to the present day.

Nevertheless, I do feel that the main thesis of this book - that China will rule the world - is ultimately not sustained. In spite of the sensational title (no doubt a marketing strategem in order to sell more books (worked on me!), the writer actually takes a very even handed approach to the subject by acknowledging both the achievements and challenges, the strengths and weaknesses of the Chinese civilisation state. So the impression that one is left with in the end is equivocal. China may suceed ultimately in dominating the world - or not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Walter W. Ko on October 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book was carefully researched and written by a British journalist with a Western prism. He spent a good portion in the history 101 of China to help the Western mind to understand and comprehen. Understanding the past helps envision the future as Martin projects what he concludes with eight points in the last chapter. He is drumming up to welcome China into the global theater and stirs up pros and antis.

For a long time, China is the global trader with Middle East and Africa in silk and china and other goods by sea and land Silk Roads. The impact of Confucianism on statecraft helps the country in efficiency, competence and ability to undertake enormous public projects. The long civilization and technical advance at a high point in the Ming Dynasty was no match as Europe just came out of the Dark Age, America was still a continent to explore. European started the Industrial and Agricultural Revolutions after Jesuits introduced Chinese philosophy, notably Taoism and Confucianism back home to fuel the Enlightenment Movement. It was Mencius teaching that people has the divine right to take over if the Son of Heaven lost the Mandate to govern. Is it the very idea of democracy to promote French and American Revolutions? In Confucianism, his ideal of a commonwealth state is that in the democratic selection, the virtuous, worthy and capable candidate will be elected to hold civil posts.

Martin mentions that it is likely when China comes on, the old tributary system will come back with possible orbit from Australia and New Zealand. Why ancient and modern countries rush to China to be tributary and trade? Why Taoism and Confucianism attract more Westerners for power and freedom and gung ho?
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