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When Evening Comes: The Education of a Hospice Volunteer Hardcover – October 6, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0312268718 ISBN-10: 0312268718 Edition: First Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; First Edition edition (October 6, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312268718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312268718
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #750,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Andreae's experiences as a freelance writer and mystery author (Smoke Eaters) are evident in this account of her experiences as a hospice volunteer with female patients in the last stages of cancer. Hospice volunteers work through a local agency and provide support for families when their members are dying. Written in a very readable diary format, this book traces the author's experience from rank newcomer to seasoned volunteer. She reveals how the experiences helped her to grow and how she was able to assist the families to whom she was assigned. The first chapter, "Bivie," was privately published as One Woman's Death: A Hospice Volunteer's First Case. This book is valuable for helping us understand the work hospice volunteers do and some of the problems and issues they face. A useful addition to consume-health collections.DMary J. Jarvis, Amarillo, TX
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

For those still confused by the hospice concept, Andreae, who has volunterred for a decade at Blue Ridge Hospice in rural Virginia, imparts some idea of what hospice programs are and are like. Most of Andreae's 15 patients, however, spent their final days and died at home, and as a detailed account of dying in a hospice, Tim Brookes' Signs of Life (1997) is more helpful. Still, Andreae writes movingly and perceptively of her patients and herself, and even tells stories on herself. Hospice care changes everyone involved, she shows, not least because dying is a process, not an event, and its needs are as likely to appear late at night as at more convenient hours. She volunteers because she loves the work despite hospice patients, their spouses, and their families being no more lovable or saintly than anyone else. She is realistic and knows that pain cannot always be controlled and that rejections by patients occur. Ultimately, she demonstrates well the values of a successful hospice program. William Beatty
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Janice Cosby on October 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book for anyone interested in hospice work. But beyond that, I would recommend it to anyone who is facing the death of someone close to them, or ever will, or anyone who just wants to understand better before facing their own end of life. Christine Andreae, writing about her own experiences as a hospice volunteer, shows us that there are no hard and fast rules about what you should or shouldn't do when helping people face the end of a life. Tears are okay, but so is laughter. Questions are okay, even if no one knows the answer.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Eve Carr on October 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Sooner or later, we all lose someone very important to us. Reading this book won't make that process easier, but it will help you develop a deeper understand of the process of dying--and how it affects all those who know the dying person differently.
This book provides an extremely personal insight of how, even as a stranger, one can be supportive of someone who is dying. It's a sad story, of course, but one that is rich in uncovering the meaning of life.
It really makes you stop and recognize what's important--and what isn't and remember just how precious and short life really is.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By V. Atkinson on March 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have read many excellent books on the subjects of death, dying and hospice. This was not among them. The beginning was interesting and compassionate (Bivie), however I felt the long pages documenting the dying process of one patient in particular (Amber) were needlessly judgmental and unkind. The author obviously was not able to make a human connection with her patient. Perhaps the facts were accurate, but I would not appreciate having the author as my hospice volunteer. A real downer.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Christine Andreae has done a masterful job of letting us in on the details of life as a hospice worker. We see the mundane routines and the difficult relationships as well as the deep stirrings evoked by connections with souls at a turning point. The book's rhythms keep the reader thoroughly engaged. There is no sugar coating here. There is an abundance of honesty and soul. Anyone involved with death and dying (isn't this all of us?) should read this book
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book provides the reader with an poignant story of the author's experience as a hospice volunteer. Christine Andreae provides the reader with a real look at end of life care. I think it would be a great resource for anyone wanting to volunteer with hospice patients and for anyone who has had to deal with someone with a terminal illness
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