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When It Hits the Fan: Managing the Nine Crises of Business Hardcover – November, 1986


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 271 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (T); 1st Edition, First printing edition (November 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395411718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395411711
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,745,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Former American Motors chairman Meyers, a visiting professor at the Carnegie-Mellon business school, and Holusha, Detroit bureau chief of the New York Times, outline fateful stages in a corporate business crisis: gradual failure (of product, management or market), denial and recrimination, anger and fear, panic and collapse. The pattern in recent years is oft-repeatedContinental Illinois, Schlitz, Union Carbide, Braniff Air, to name a few. But crises can be managed, stress the authors, and, if overcome, can give a corporation new life and create new business heroes (e.g., Lee Iacocca's last-minute crisis management at Chrysler). Meyers and Holusha provide an absorbing look at the dark side of American business along with a generous bundle of object lessons for turning things around.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Meyers, former chairman of American Motors, and Holusha, Detroit bureau chief for the New York Times, briefly outline nine crises which face organizations. Their explanation of each type of crisis is really a vignette about organizations such as Chrysler, TWA, International Harvester, Continental, and Atari. There is nothing new in the stories, which have been covered before. The discussion of managing crises only touches the surface of a very serious topic facing managers. For large collections.Jane M. Kathman, Management Dept., 37 South College Avenue, Col lege of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minn.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 14, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book does an excellent job detailing 9 different types of crises that businesses face, from product failure to management succession to a cash crisis. Meyers provides examples and perspective from executives that experienced each of these crises, and how (and why) some managed through successfully while others led to further troubles for the company. I highly recommend this book as well as Meyers' 2nd book, "Healers, Dealers, Brutes, and Saviors."
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author describes nine organizational failures many of which will be familiar even if they occurred 20 years ago. In all instances the problems that caused grief to the organization were known, usually in the form of writing, but ignored. The solution to a problem was to "hope" it might go away. GM is the modern classic of known, but ignored, warnings that eventually led to Congressional hearings. Government has the same problem. There were many, ignored, warnings about the Obamacare website and the outcome was a disaster. Failure or accepting bad news is something organizations have trouble with.
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Format: Hardcover
This older book is still one of the best out there for crisis preparedness planning. The next frontier of liability is negligent failure to plan. (And reacting wrongly - highly likely - will definitely make things worse.) All CEOs should be aware and proactive in this area.
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By William T. Orr on August 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Good book with great examples of good and poor crisis management.
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