When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.00
  • Save: $6.17 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Clean used copy with no markings.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out: The World's Most Resilient Country and Its Struggle to Rise Again Hardcover – November 9, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.83
$3.00 $0.01
Showcase%20Weekly%20Deal


Frequently Bought Together

When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out: The World's Most Resilient Country and Its Struggle to Rise Again + Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Price for both: $31.17

Buy the selected items together
  • Angela's Ashes: A Memoir $11.34

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade; First Edition edition (November 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230102735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230102736
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #869,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“In this solid debut, USA Today global affairs reporter Lynch tells the story of a small nation that has changed profoundly in recent decades…Incisive and well-reported.”--Kirkus

"David Lynch's book is an amazing story of rampaging greed, dirty doings and even adulterous sex!Old Mother Ireland doffs her peasant's garb and emerges as a provocative siren, infecting the Irish with diseased materialism. Along with a concise history of Ireland, Lynch makes even economics funny and fascinating." --Malachy McCourt

"A brilliant set of insights into the true and completely general nature of 'crony capitalism'. Close connections between politicians, bankers, and property developers brought Ireland great apparent prosperity -- while really creating the conditions for a huge and horrible crash. Lynch is optimistic that Ireland can rise again and find a more robust model for growth. Let's hope he is right." --Simon Johnson, Professor, MIT Sloan School of Management and author of 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown

"David Lynch's book will enrage, enlighten, and sadden you. His superbly written account of what really happened in Ireland during the boom of the Celtic Tiger and the ensuing bust is, to be sure, a story about Ireland. But it is also a cautionary tale for all of us. The next time somebody tells you that the market can only go up, run away and re-read this book!" -- Terry Golway, columnist, The Irish Echo and author of So Others Might Live

"Lynch marvelously weaves together politics, history, and religion to explain the incredible economic and social transformation that has swept Ireland over the past three decades and the deep financial crisis that Ireland is grappling with today." --Kenneth S. Rogoff, Professor of Economics, Harvard University and coauthor of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly

"David Lynch has produced a terrific read -- a hair-raising gallop through the hills and valleys of modern day finance. After reading this book, you'll never think about Ireland -- or global financial markets -- in quite the same way." --David M. Smick, author of The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy

"A tour de force of reportage and analysis. As much social anthropology as economic forensics, it is a cautionary tale of post-colonial success and excess. As cold as the eye he casts upon the land of his forebears is, Lynch retains an unmistakable affection for Ireland and a confidence that it can change, change utterly, for the better." --Kevin Cullen, columnist and former Dublin bureau chief, The Boston Globe

About the Author

David J. Lynch is a senior writer with Bloomberg News in Washington, D.C., focusing on the intersection of politics and economics. Previously, he covered global business issues for USA Today, first writing for the Money section, then becoming the founding bureau chief in both London and Beijing. In 2001, he became the first journalist from USA Today to be selected for the prestigious Nieman fellowship at Harvard University. He has made numerous television appearances on BBC and Sky News in London and C-SPAN and PBS in the United States. His writing has also appeared in The New Republic, Time, and The New York Times. He lives in Washington, D.C.


More About the Author

David J. Lynch, 51, is a senior writer with Bloomberg News covering the intersection of politics and economics. Prior to joining Bloomberg's Washington bureau in October 2010, he covered the global economy for USA TODAY. He joined the paper in 1994 as a staff writer in the Money section before becoming the founding bureau chief in both London and Beijing.

Lynch covered the war in Kosovo and was an embedded reporter with the U.S. Marines in the invasion of Iraq. In 2001, he became the first journalist from USA TODAY to be selected for the prestigious Nieman fellowship at Harvard University. He has reported from more than 50 countries.

An experienced public speaker, Lynch has made numerous television appearances on BBC and Sky News in London and C-SPAN and PBS in the United States. Before joining USA TODAY, Lynch covered the aerospace industry for The Orange County Register in southern California, where he won several awards. In the 1980s, he was the editor of a trade publication focused on national security issues in Washington, D.C., called Defense Week.

Lynch has a masters degree in international relations from Yale University and a B.A. from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Ct. He lives outside Washington with his wife Kathleen and their three sons.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By cheartfield on December 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Though I am a big reader of history and biography, I typically shy away from economic histories or books written from an international finance perspective. However, "When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out" was a delightful read, filled with very helpful comparative illustrations and some great anecdotes and stories along with lots of facts and analysis. I especially like the way the author traces the lives of several of the main players and others in Ireland during this period; it provides a ground-level and human perspective on the roller-coaster ride the Irish are experiencing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David on January 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I just completed "When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out." The author portrays a genuine fondness for Ireland that is compelling to the reader, but this is a new Ireland, not one focused on the historical ruins, the pipes and pubs, shamrocks, and the cultural landscapes of Counties Sligo or Mayo. Instead, it is an excellently written examination of the rise and the fall of the phenomenal Irish "Celtic Tiger." The book examines the many facets of Irish banking, government, telecommunications, real estate and their overall society that experienced phenomenal changes between from the 1980's until 2010. What particularly interested me is the author's explanation of the remarkable change that Ireland experienced when they moved from an almost stoic, theology-structured society in the 1970's & `80s to an aggressive entrepreneurial, culturally expansive and eventually a super-heated consumer culture, which eventually lead to the bursting of the Celtic Tiger's bubble in the past 2 ½ years. There are many similarities between the incredibly hot real estate and housing markets in Dublin and in the greater Washington, DC area in the late 1990's and 2000's. It seems that dollars were flying everywhere in both places at the same time when an ethos of complete recklessness in the real estate markets was the norm by government, finance and real estate professionals. This massive flow of dollars impacted elected and government officials in both Ireland and the greater DC area. The parallels between Dublin and the DC area are many. Some places in the DC area such as Prince George's County, Maryland are still experiencing the political fallout from the developer driven economic engine that was too hot to sustain over the long term. The same appeared to happen on a more aggressive scale in Ireland. Best wishes to Ireland and I hope that their incredibly resilient culture will find a way for their Celtic Tiger to find its roar once again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen T. Hopkins VINE VOICE on February 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
David Lynch has written a lively account of the bubble and bust of the Celtic tiger in his book, When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out. He covers the politicians and the bankers along with the property developers and the Irish consumers. The key word in the title is "luck;" Lynch makes the point that the Irish had good luck on the way up, and bad luck on the way down. If you haven't selected your Saint Patrick's Day reading yet, consider giving this book a try, and lift a pint or two to commiserate with the troubles of the Irish. A short and finely written essay on the same topic comes from Michael Lewis in the March 2011 issue of Vanity Fair titled, "When Irish Eyes Are Crying." If you like Lewis' article, chances are good that you'll enjoy Lynch's book.

Rating: Three-star (Recommended)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. O'Donnell on January 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I LOVED this book. I learned a lot about my Irish ancestors and laughed a lot, thanks to the author's clever writing and sly wit.
While I worried I'd be bored with the dry details of Ireland's financial problems, the book really came alive with the tales of Irish personalities Lynch sprinkled throughout the book. I'd recommend this book to anyone with any "Irish" in their blood, those trying to understand the global economic crisis or any reader who simply loves great writing and storytelling. Ireland's story of greed isn't that much different than many other countries, including our own. It's just more colorful and tragic for a country that's been down so long. It is said that the Irish forget everything but the grudges. For the sake of the troubled island, I hope this is one lesson they won't lose sight of. Lynch's book will make it that much harder for them to ignore.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Patty Cavanaugh on April 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fascinating and very informative. An easy and enjoyable read. So much more than an analysis of recent history - he goes through so much of the Irish history to give context to modern events. An excellent book from every perspective.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?