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When Sherman Marched North from the Sea: Resistance on the Confederate Home Front (Civil War America) [Paperback]

Jacqueline Glass Campbell
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

August 29, 2005 0807856592 978-0807856598
Home front and battle front merged in 1865 when General William T. Sherman occupied Savannah and then marched his armies north through the Carolinas. Although much has been written about the military aspects of Sherman's March, Jacqueline Campbell reveals a more complex story. Integrating evidence from Northern soldiers and from Southern civilians, black and white, male and female, Campbell demonstrates the importance of culture for determining the limits of war and how it is fought.

Sherman's March was an invasion of both geographical and psychological space. The Union army viewed the Southern landscape as military terrain. But when they brought war into Southern households, Northern soldiers were frequently astounded by the fierceness with which many white Southern women defended their homes. Campbell argues that in the household-centered South, Confederate women saw both ideological and material reasons to resist. While some Northern soldiers lauded this bravery, others regarded such behavior as inappropriate and unwomanly.

Campbell also investigates the complexities behind African Americans' decisions either to stay on the plantation or to flee with Union troops. Black Southerners' delight at the coming of the army of "emancipation" often turned to terror as Yankees plundered their homes and assaulted black women.

Ultimately, When Sherman Marched North from the Sea calls into question postwar rhetoric that represented the heroic defense of the South as a male prerogative and praised Confederate women for their "feminine" qualities of sentimentality, patience, and endurance. Campbell suggests that political considerations underlie this interpretation--that Yankee depredations seemed more outrageous when portrayed as an attack on defenseless women and children. Campbell convincingly restores these women to their role as vital players in the fight for a Confederate nation, as models of self-assertion rather than passive self-sacrifice.



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When Sherman Marched North from the Sea: Resistance on the Confederate Home Front (Civil War America) + The Union War + Apostles of Disunion: Southern Secession Commissioners and the Causes of the Civil War (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A worthy addition to the burgeoning literature focusing on the social and cultural aspects of the Civil War. Concise yet thoroughly researched, it contributes fresh, thought-provoking insights into a long-neglected area of study: the interaction between General William T. Sherman's soldiers and southern civilians, black and white, male and female, during his march through the Carolinas." -- "The South Carolina Historical Magazine"

Book Description

"A worthy addition to the burgeoning literature focusing on the social and cultural aspects of the Civil War. Concise yet thoroughly researched, it contributes fresh, thought-provoking insights into a long-neglected area of study: the interaction between General William T. Sherman's soldiers and southern civilians, black and white, male and female, during his march through the Carolinas."--The South Carolina Historical Magazine

Product Details

  • Series: Civil War America
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (August 29, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807856592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807856598
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #672,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
(3)
3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Rate work. January 11, 2004
Format:Hardcover
This is a very condensed book, mainly dealing with how the war, ( Sherman's March) affected the people in the path of Shermans army. Mrs. Campbell (the author, and a professor of history) uses extensive footnotes, and numerous sources, from a wide spectrum of people, and authors. One thing Mrs. Campbell bears on, is how Shermans march affected the African-American people, and how it differed with it's affect on the white people; and the differences in effect it had on the moral of the people, versus the effect it had on the Confederate soldiers.
If you're new to Shermans March, this is a good book to start with. It's an excellent, quick view of the effect on the Southern people.
If you've read extensively, on Sherman March, this is an excellent book, that adds to your knowledge.
I also recomment, "Sherman's March"-Richard Wheeler; "Shermans March"-Burke Davis; as well as Shermans March through the Carolina's"- John G. Barrett.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Observations March 15, 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Campbell makes a compelling argument in her differentiation between Sherman's march South to the sea which was relatively tame in comparison to his march North from the sea that was indicative of Total War or the Hard Hand of War as Grimsley calls it. Campbell's observations regarding the attitude of slaves during the occupation does not always mesh with the brutality often expressed by Douglas, Jacobs, and other slaves that escaped to the North prior to the war. Campbell observes that many of the slaves viewed Northern soldiers with greater contempt than that which they held their Southern owners. This book does raise serious questions to the amount of sensationalism that accompanied some of these earlier inflammatory writings.
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7 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is what happens when 21st. Century feminist thinking trys to layer itself over the 19th. Century and the American Civil War.

Basicly the book deals with the abuse of white southern women, black women and the wanton destruction of property by General Sherman's campaign through the Southern heart land in 1864. Using limited sources the author builds a case of excessive violence, rape and destruction of property. Gen. Sherman's campaign is well documented and know to historians and although there obviously were examples of what Prof. Campbell described it was not the normal standard of behaviour of Gen. Sherman's Army of 61K.

I have no doubt that the examples given in this text are factualy true but the historicaly records as well as personal diaries and letters that have survived strongly indicate that these atrocities toward Souther civilians or slave were the norm.
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