Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon, and unbeatable customer service. Amazon Prime customers get free 2-day shipping. Millions of satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

When Snow Turns to Rain: One Family's Struggle to Solve the Riddle of Autism Paperback – August 1, 1993


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.93 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

$7 Showcase Weekly Deals in Biographies & Memoirs
Browse the showcase weekly book deal featuring select paperback and hardcover titles for $7. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Woodbine House (August 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0933149638
  • ISBN-13: 978-0933149632
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,558,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

At the age of 18 months, Jordan was a precocious, verbal, active toddler. By age 312 he was withdrawn, mute, and unable to socialize with parents or peers. The diagnosis: delayed-onset autism. Schulze, Jordan's father, details this bizarre disability in diary style. He and his wife proudly recorded Jordan's early growth until they realized something was wrong. The particularly scary elements of this account include the parents' search for appropriate schooling and treatment; the decision to send Jordan to Japan for treatment; and the family's frequent moves and job absences. One wonders how less motivated parents could have coped and succeeded. The Schulzes, though despondent and weary, never give up hope: "We can deal with almost anything," Schulze claims. At book's end, Jordan is seven, mute, reclusive, and aggressive. This powerful tale of a little-known illness that has only recently received literary attention (e.g., Donna Williams's Nobody Nowhere , LJ 9/1/92; Judy Barron's There's a Boy in Here , LJ 2/1/92) is highly recommended.
- Linda Beck, Indian Valley P.L., Telford, Pa.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Shortly after reading "When Snow Turns to Rain", I had the privilege and pleasure of meeting Craig Schulze and his autistic son Jordan, and my respect and admiration for Craig grew even further. I am the mother of an autistic 12-year old, and have experienced many of the same wild hopes and crushing disappointments that Craig describes so well in his book. I found this book extremely well written, informative, and inspiring. It certainly describes the bizarre and sometimes frightening behaviors of some children with autism in vivid detail. What I want to know is, how did Craig find the time to keep a journal and write down all this as it was happening? I have trouble keeping track of my son's current-year IEP (individualized education plan)! I do have to caution, however, that some people may be saddened and depressed (my mother, for one). There is no "happy ending"; Jordan's autism is not cured, and he doesn't develop a fantastic savant skill that somehow balance things out. But Jordan is a real person, who is loved fiercely and well. His story deserves to be told, and is told well, in "When Snow Turns to Rain."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1998
Format: Paperback
A painfully honest, witty and intelligent account of the author's son Jordan, who developed symptoms of autism after several years of apparently normal development (a rare pattern somtimes known as Childhood Disintegrative Disorder).
The book chronicles Jordan's development, regression and diagnosis, and his parents' desperate search for a cure as they struggle to come to terms with their son's condition. In contrast to some other popular accounts of autism, the book tells the story of a child for whom no treatment produces a "miracle cure" or "amazing recovery" (in other words, a child typical of the overwhelming majority of those with autism). Some treatments or methods of education seem to help; others are ineffective; none produce a "cure". At the book's end, life goes on, though radically altered.
A further account of Jordan's life features in "When Autism Strikes: Families Cope with Childhood Disintegrative Disorder" edited by Robert A. Catalano.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A reader on December 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
After years of reading book after book, article after article, website after website--combing the earth for remedies for our son's autism, I came across this book. In contrast to all the others, this one offered no imperatives, no miracle cures. It merely said, "you are not alone" as it described my very own feelings about the emotional roller coaster that is autism. If I had the incredible insight and writing talent that Craig Schulze pours into this book, I would have written it myself. I don't, so I'm glad that he did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search