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When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Library)
 
 


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When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Library) [Hardcover]

Pema Chodron
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (391 customer reviews)

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Much like Zen, Pema Chodron's interpretation of Tibetan Buddhism takes the form of a nontheistic spiritualism. In When Things Fall Apart this head of a Tibetan monastery in Canada outlines some relevant and deceptively profound terms of Tibetan Buddhism that are germane to modern issues. The key to all of these terms is accepting that in the final analysis, life is groundless. By letting go, we free ourselves to face fear and obstacles and offer ourselves unflinchingly to others. The graceful, conversational tone of Chodron's writing gives the impression of sitting on a pillow across from her, listening to her everyday examples of Buddhist wisdom. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Pema Chodron, a student of Chogyam Trunpa Rinpoche and Abbot of Gampo Abbey, has written the Tibetan Buddhist equivalent of Harold Kushner's famous book, When Bad Things Happen to Good People. As the author indicates in the postscript to her book: "We live in difficult times. One senses a possibility they may get worse." Consequently, Chodron's book is filled with useful advice about how Buddhism helps readers to cope with the grim realities of modern life, including fear, despair, rage and the feeling that we are not in control of our lives. Through reflections on the central Buddhist teaching of right mindfulness, Chodron orients readers and gives them language with which to shape their thinking about the ordinary and extraordinary traumas of modern life. But most importantly, Chodron demonstrates how effective the Buddhist point of view can be in bringing order into disordered lives.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

An American Buddhist nun and author (Start Where You Are, LJ 6/1/94), Chodron here passes on the teachings of the Venerable Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, advising a loving kindness toward oneself and awakening a compassionate attitude toward our pain and the pain of others. The readings allow us to reconnect with a truth already known or to find a new way of looking at everyday chaos. Throughout, we are shown basic Buddhist beliefs and given instructions in discovering one's true nature through asking questions, facing one's fears, and dealing with the present. The instructions can be taken as meditations, affirmations, or simple reminders of how to transform our minds and actions into nonaggression, which benefits ourselves and society. Popular reading recommended for all libraries; Chodron is donating the proceeds of this book to the Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, Canada.?Leo Kritz, West Des Moines P.L., Ia.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"The Tibetan Buddhist equivalent of Harold Kushner's When Bad Things Happen to Good People . . . Chödrön demonstrates how effective the Buddhist point of view can be in bringing order into disordered lives."—Publishers Weekly

"This is a book that could serve you for a lifetime."—Natural Health Magazine

"As one of Pema Chödrön's grateful students, I have been learning the most pressing and necessary lesson of all: how to keep opening wider my own heart."—Alice Walker

Book Description

Pema Chodron offers her core teachings on how to use our darkest moments to illuminate the path to freedom, by embracing the experiences that typically make us freeze, suppress, or act out our feelings --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Pema Chödrön is an American Buddhist nun in the lineage of Chögyam Trungpa. She is resident teacher at Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, the first Tibetan monastery in North America established for Westerners. She is the author of many books and audiobooks, including the best-selling When Things Fall Apart and Don't Bite the Hook.

From AudioFile

The author says that awareness through meditation can teach us what is true, even when the truth is painful or disorienting. Usually we fight with uncomfortable emotion or act it out in habitual ways; we want things on our own terms and don't want to think about how they affect others. Feelings like craving, resentment, aggression and depression are too much to bear. But by embracing these realities, we can heal and open up to the fundamental joy that is our birthright. We can connect with our noble heart, which "is not affected by all our kicking and screaming." With gentleness and a broad grasp of the human spirit, the author makes this material very inviting, like therapy with a wise, existential therapist. T.W. © AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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