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When Winning Costs Too Much: Steroids, Supplements and Scandal in Today's Sports Hardcover – March 10, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing; 1st Taylor Trade Pub. Ed edition (March 10, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589791797
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589791794
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,076,307 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The use of performance-enhancing drugs is an invidious practice, condoned by too many and ignored by more. This work explores the nature and extent of such activity and its authors are to be congratulated for turning over some of the rocks and exposing the rot that threatens the lives and well-being of young athletes. (Richard W. Pound, Founding Chair of the World Anti-Doping Agency )

Have you ever wondered what's happened to the 'purity' of sport - where playing the game for sheer enjoyment and the thrill of competition were reward enough; where fair play, i.e. ethics and integrity, were an integral part of each contest? Dr. Bailes and McCloskey have invested years of study to produce this incredibly informative book on the 'state of the sportsworld.' As a former professional athlete I am ecstatic that the authors of 'When Winning Costs Too Much' are willing to identify and confront the 'wrongs' in the world of sport. This book should be required reading for the parents of all aspiring athletes! (Steve Bartkowski, two-time Pro Bowl quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons )

Throughout my career I have had both great success and great struggles. But I have always been able to overcome the struggles with honor and with a respect for the rules and integrity of the game. Kids today need to know how important that is to succeed in sports and life. 'When Winning Costs Too Much' can help parents know whether or not their kids are on the righttrack. (Hal Sutton, winner of 12 PGA Tour events, including the 1983 PGA Championship, and the captain of the 2004 Ryder Cup team )

I loved the book, and was blown away by all the information and warnings about the impact of concussions and steroid use. I was forced to retire prematurely due to concussions so I know first hand of the dangers from head trauma. The book will help all who read it to know what takes place at the time of a concussion, what to look for, and the best way to care for that person before returning back to action. The information on the prevalence of steroid use was mind-boggling. Every player, coach and parent should read it so that everyone understands the potential disasters that can occur. (Merril Hoge, former Pittsburgh Steelers and Chicago Bears running back who is now an NFL analyst for ESPN former Pittsburgh Steelers and Chi )

In 'When Winning Costs Too Much,' Julian Bailes and John McCloskey provide factual data and compelling testimonials to present a devastating portrait of sports in America today. Together the authors have assembled more hard-won research than I've ever seen on the subject of steroid abuse and its effects not only on the individual performer but on society as a whole. Here is a screed against a culture that celebrates dopers who cheat to get ahead. It also is a document with a powerful personal message that comes with equal measures of good and bad news. First the good: Only about one out of 10 young athletes in this country is using drugs to help him perform better. Now the bad: Every last one of us is being victimized as a result. (John Ed Bradley, All-American center at LSU and Sports Illustrated writer )

The single greatest lesson I learned from athletics that has contributed to my success in other areas of my life is that winning isn't everything. Somewhere along the way too many people have forgotten that it is the pursuit of success, not success itself, which makes the games worth playing. 'When Winning Costs Too Much' will help parents and athletes understand how much of the journey is lost by taking the easy route. (Chris Nowinski, World Wrestling Entertainment star, former Harvard football player, Founding Board Member of Teams of Angels )

...examines the broader intent of what people go through to win... (Therese Smith Cox Charleston Daily Mail )

"When Winning Costs Too Much," a comprehensive analysis of the rise in steroids and supplement abuse at all levels of sports (Inter-Mountain )

McCloskey and co-writer Julian Bailes spare no anecdotal or pharmacological detail in illustrating how the once-proud world of professional sports is threatening to degenerate into a narcotic-stained sinkhole. (Houston Press )

About the Author

Dr. Julian E. Bailes is a neurosurgeon who has worked the NFL Players Association in tracking long-term effects of concussions, steroid use, and depression among its retired players. He lives in Morgantown, W.V. John McCloskey is a sports editor at the Houston Chronicle. He lives in Houston.

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Customer Reviews

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Betty Burks on September 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is about winning at all costs in the sports world. Rampant use of drugs and steroids to enhance performances from Olympics to individual games show the decline in the sports ofr sports sake mentality. Two of my sons played sports as youngsters and high school athletes. The other was the best lifeguard in Pulaski, and one used steroids. I, on the other hand, have had to use them twice for a stubborn ear infection which just won't ever go away.

Winning costs too much in all aspects of life. When we win, that means that someone else loses. Fighting for the sake of winning in marriage, work competition, other debates, and just living day-to-day takes its toll on our health. If we win, we get overly excited putting stress on the heart. If we lose, it also puts too much stress on the heart and I'm not talking about our heart-strings (romance). We all want to win at whatever we try. Here lately, I don't seem to be winning at any of my endeavors and, believe me, that hurts more than having a heart attack, At least, that's a fast way to go and the pain goes away.

We have brought up this generation to win or don't ever try again. In earlier eras, it was war which took its toll on our young men who were trained to win at all costs. War kills indiscriminately. But so does retaliation, resentment, hate, and being torn apart by strangers who need not inerfere in our lives in the first place. Today, everyone is a critic and set out to hurt feelings and make ourselves felt. Who cares whether you actually know the person you are flailing out at and hurting their feelings? That makes it impersonal. It makes the critic feel important and gets his venom out of his system onto an unsuspecting victim randomly chosen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Varvara on February 25, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Although it would take a naïve person to believe that steroid abuse is not prevalent in sports, this preeminent novel highlights scandals and stories that have plagued the purity of sports. When Winning Cost too Much goes into detail about the negative affects of steroid abuse and how it is changing the nature of sports. Sports figures are idolized by society, but how can we idolize athletes that "cheat the system." Do we encourage our children to cheat on their math tests? This is a great book, that will have you questioning modern day sports.
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Format: Hardcover
When Winning Costs Too Much is a great book that not only covers anabolic steroids and supplements but concussions, fair play, sportsmanship, officiating, media, and authority surrounding sports. I really like the presentation and logic of the arguments presented by the authors, and clearly, they have literally hit the spot. It makes total sense to me, and I agree with everything. I just got a better idea. Why not just give out a lifetime ban from any sport to anybody for the first drug offense? I guarantee you that the players are going to immediately clean up their behaviors, and guess what...the number of fans will actually increase. On the other hand, I can't believe that the authors decided to include George W. Bush, Carl Lewis, and Myles Brand as proponents against the issues of anabolic steroids and unethical behaviors. Before Bush was the President of United States, he was the owner of the Texas Rangers that included Jose Canseco, Ivan Rodriguez Rafael Palmeiro, and Alex Rodriguez who were taking anabolic steroids during that period. There is no way that he couldn't have known what was going on. And also, his father hired Arnold Schwarzenegger, a major user of steroids during his bodybuilding days, to be the chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Carl Lewis, the supposed victim of the scandal that Ben Johnson caused in 1988 Olympics, actually failed drug tests which were all covered up by Olympics officials because he was from USA whereas Ben Johnson was from Canada. Myles Brand was the president of Indiana University and became the president of NCAA. From 2002 to 2009, Brand saw NCAA football and basketball to be billion dollar companies where lack of discipline and punishment have run rampant.Read more ›
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