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When Your Pet Dies: How to Cope With Your Feelings Hardcover – October, 1985


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (October 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671541579
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671541576
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,708,755 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
Mr. Quackenbush's book was the first to arrive.
Hilary P.
He told me that "there is something doggie about me" and to this day I consider it one of the nicest things anyone has ever said to me.
Marcy Rosenthal
It offers different scenarios and actual events which you can truly identify with and understand.
Teala

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I'm surprised no one else has reviewed this wonderful book. I happened to run across it at my local library.Two weeks after euthanising my Cat of seventeen years,I practically fell apart in the bookstore browsing the pet section .I knew i had to look at my feelings of grief. This book was such a compassionate friend to me during that time.He quoted alot of others' experiences with their losses and the pain they felt. This helped me so much to truly feel my loss,especially since I had put him to sleep.the guilt over that can really wreak havocwith you.There is a section specifically about that ,too.His chapters cover all the ways you can lose a pet,which was welcoming.What I loved most about it was his understanding that your grief is as real as losing a person,just as deep and your love,just as strong.As soon as I opened the book,I didn't feel foolish any more,and let the tears flow.And consequently,I was able to move through my grief much quicker.It's a warm,compassionate book,and I was looking for it for a friend who just lost a pet too.I highly recommend it.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Hilary P. on December 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I purchased this book along with several others after a complex (non-emergency) euthanasia decision I knew long in advance was a lose-lose situation. I knew euthanizing my precious elderly animal because of intense personal duress would almost be tantamount to suicide, and I waited until circumstances had broken me before proceeding with it. (So far, my dire prediction has proved true; the aftermath *is* as bad as anticipated.)

Mr. Quackenbush's book was the first to arrive. My grief is so deep I didn't think anything written by a stranger would do more than divert me. I had no expectation at all a book might help me by hitting nerves and letting the pain flow, a situation infinitely preferable than the numbness and despair I lapsed into. But the book accomplished this in two ways: 1) The author wisely, humbly, and frequently makes disclaimers about "complex" or "unusual" reasons certain people are forced to choose euthanasia. Quackenbush is or was affiliated with the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and, while his book is a succession of anecdotes, he shows exquisite sensitivity in selecting particular stories of pet loss. Many if not most of these stories note how stressors IN ADDITION TO the looming prospect of euthanasia play a part in the horrible time for the pet owner. Finally, he assures the reader that euthanasia will most likely be the ugliest decision any human being will have to make--which in itself is tremendous and tender comfort.

2) He makes the reader feel, throughout, as if he is on *your* side. In other words, his book is about as apolitical and compassionate as a book on such a subject can be.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Oscar and Penelope on August 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I've read three pet loss books for adults (two when my dog was dying, and one a few months after her death), and I think this is the best one of the three. The author pretty much hit it on the spot about all my feelings associated with the loss of my dog. The book made me feel that I'm not alone in the loss of my doggie "soul mate", that it's okay to feel this bad for a while when an animal companion dies. Yet he doesn't make generalizations, like some books do. He said certain things work for most people, BUT there are exceptions. Although at the end I feel that I'm just like most people, but at least the book gave me "permission" to think of other options.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Marcy Rosenthal on March 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have read this book a few times in my life after pets have died, and it always helps. In 1986 when my dog Lily died at a young age, I wrote to the author Jamie Quackenbush and he called me one night and we talked for a long time. He told me that "there is something doggie about me" and to this day I consider it one of the nicest things anyone has ever said to me. This past week our beloved 16 year old cat died and again I find myself reaching for this book to help me during this sad time, and I know it will
I was saddened to hear of Jamie's death a few years back. He was a true pioneer in pet loss and bereavement....and a really sweet man who helped me very much. I am thankful for the book and the talk we had.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kaylynn on June 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I can't say enough about how this book helped me. I remembered reading about it years ago in a magazine. I searched and finally found one in a new age bookstore! I have loaned this book out so many times.

I have found that the reader has to be ready to read......so give it all the time you need. Once you are through you will be so glad the book was written.

Thank you Jamie Quackenbush for helping me through a very sad time. K
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