'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?': Joyce Carol... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.95
  • Save: $2.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
'Where Are You Going, Whe... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by FPQ Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The cover is clean but does show some wear. The cover has slightly curled corners. There is light highlighting or handwriting throughout the book. Item ships secure with Fulfillment By Amazon, Prime customers get 2nd day at no charge!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?': Joyce Carol Oates (Women Writers: Texts and Contexts) Paperback – November 1, 1994


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.56
$12.89 $0.54
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$21.56 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?': Joyce Carol Oates (Women Writers: Texts and Contexts) + Smooth Talk
Price for both: $63.51

Buy the selected items together
  • Smooth Talk $41.95

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Women Writers: Texts and Contexts
  • Paperback: 178 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (November 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813521351
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813521350
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 6.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #778,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Raoul Duke on March 3, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my literature class - it was excellent, my first time reading Oates and I most definately recommend her if you are interested in literature (or even if you're not - the background of her short story is interesting - based on a real-life serial killer in Arizona). The critical essays in the back of the book are invaluable, so if you are looking to write a research paper this is a fanstastic purchase!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By CallistianStar on February 8, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The price is a little bit much for this short story that you can find online, but otherwise still a really compelling coming-of-age story.

What this book offers, however, is just a couple of papers of critique on the book and what Oates meant by some of the events in the book.

I needed this for a class, but I don't mind keeping it. Still a good buy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
picked up as a reading for my Contemporary Literature class. I like having the extra writing/essays to review. Bought used-got a great buy and book in excellent shape
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
Arnold Friend for the short story "Where are you going, where have you been" is first introduced in the story as boy with shaggy black hair, driving a convertible car, giving Connie a grin, waiving his finger at her and saying "gonna get you, baby." This leads you to believe that he is just one of the guys out on the town looking to meet girls. At this point in the story you are not really thinking any more than just that as the story turns to talk about the rest of the night Connie had. However, things change one Sunday for Connie when she decides to stay home alone instead of attending a barbeque with the rest of her family.
She wasn't home alone for very long when she heard a car pull up. When she went to the front door to see who it was, she was very taken back when she learned that it was the guy from the car the other night. He got out and said "I ain't late, am I?" Connie reminded him that she had no idea who he was. That is when he told her it was Arnold Friend and that it was also painted on the side of his car, and he was there to be her friend. Arnold tried to get Connie to go for a ride with him and his friend Ellie who had a radio that they were listening to Bobby King. Arnold knew that Connie liked Bobby King. However Connie was still taken by the fact that he knew what her name was. She questioned him as to why he even knew what her name was, and to her surprise he knew what all of her friends names were, and what her family's names were, and actually where they were at that very moment. Connie was quite frightened by this.
Connie moved from the front steps back into the house and continued to try to get Arnold to leave, talking to him through the screen door. Arnold at this point was out of his car and leaning on the front of his car.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?