Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Where We Got the Bible... Our Debt to the Catholic Church Paperback – January 1, 1994


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$98.08 $3.97

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 153 pages
  • Publisher: Tan Books & Pub; 1st edition (January 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895551373
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895551375
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #962,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

97 of 99 people found the following review helpful By John Pineda on March 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
An accurate and concise account on how the Bible came to be. Shows how the Catholic Church has defended holy scripture throughout the ages, despite the accusations of protestants and the Church's enemies. Accurately describes the rise and fall of badly translated protestant Bibles such as Tyndale's Bible (the english translation of Luther's Bible), the sinner's Bible (ommitted the word 'not' from some of the ten Commandments), etc. The English Crown ordered these versions burned or destroyed by decree when the errors were found. Errors and additions that have been handed down until this day (such as the addition of the word 'alone' by Luther to maneuver justification, and the addition of 'for thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory.....'). This book is a must have for anyone wishing to learn which books were originally contained in the Canon of scripture and who put them there. Shows why the books of the Septuagint (referred to as the Apocrypha by protestants) are included in the Bible, and were in the Jewish Canon during the time of Jesus.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
64 of 65 people found the following review helpful By V. M Salomon on July 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a short history of the Bible and how the Catholic Church regarded it. Graham describes how the cannon of the Scripture was formed and the reverence the Catholic Church has had for the Bible since she defined the cannon. He describes the Catholic Church's preservation of the Bible up to the Douay Rheims translation. (Graham's book was written in 1911) Graham takes much time explaining the process of how monks copied Bibles before the printing press. He also defends the Catholic Church against accusations that they hid the Bible to keep people ignorant of it. He uses a good dose of common sense to make his points.
Graham gives reasons why it is hard to find English Bible translations dated before the reformation. He explained that because the Protestants destroyed many Catholic objects in countries where the reformation flourished, Catholic Bibles could not be found in these areas. However, in countries where the reformation did not take foothold, there are many existing vernacular Bibles. I actually went to the Field Museum in Chicago and saw 11th century Spanish Bibles with my own two eyes. It was luck that they were on a tour as I finished the book.
My main complaint about the book is that there are almost no footnotes. He makes bold claims but no way to proof what he says. In order to test his stories, I had to do some footwork myself. For example, I learned that Martin Luther regarded the Epistle of James to be unworthy to remain in the Scriptures (mostly because of James 2:24) but I had to do some searching to verify it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
Even though originally published in 1911, this book loses nothing. This short paperback is written clearly and concisely in an attempt to counter charges that the Catholic Church detests the Bible and has burned Bibles in the past to keep their flock from reading it. History is clear: for 1500 years after Christ there was only the Catholic Church. The Church decided which books were truly inspired and those that were not. The Church laborioulsy protected the Bible through persecutions and barbarian invasions. This little book certainly is worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
After converting to Catholicism two years ago, I began a real 'scholarly' journey for the truth. The holy spirit led me out of Protestantism, but, the spirit wasn't through with me yet. It led me to this work and now I wonder how I was ever able to live without the the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church. This book has inspired me to take the study of scripture seriously and in a new and 'truth-bearing' light. I will purchase several copies for my relatives and friends! Pax
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
Too often have readers of the Bible come to take the Bible for granted, on blind faith that the Good Book is the "inspired word of God".By reading true Bible history as to how our modern day Bible came to us,we can better appreciate its value. Hendry Graham in his book "Where We Got the Bible From" does just that: dispeling entrenched notions of false translations that come to be extolled as "God's Holy Word" today,and showing us the light,in historical contexts using both both learned Catholic and esp. Protestant sources,to show the Bible's true origins as the insipired Word of God. A truly exciting read, besides Partick O'Hare's "The Facts About Luther"[TAN BOOKS,Rockford, Illinois]. Go for it!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By R. Kummer on September 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is an exceptional little book! Bishop Graham's prose style is delightful, though he can be a bit forceful at times, which may offend some Protestants. (But, if you disagree with him on any point, study up and try to refute it. You'll be sorely disappointed.) Some reviewers here have complained that the text isn't footnoted, but not many books written around the same time period (1911) were. He does, however, list a brief bibliography in the back, and if you're willing to do the research, his facts check out. It is also slightly outdated, in that he quotes and praises the Douay-Rheims Bible, which has been supplanted by the New Jerusalem and New American Bibles in English-speaking Catholic liturgical use. It is unforunate that Bishop Graham isn't around to update this with information about the Dead Sea Scrolls, as they contain even more support for the Catholic canon of the Old Testament. But these trivialities aside, this is an excellent brief history of where the Bible came from, how the canon was determined, and the Catholic thoughts on the Bible. Highly recommended for Catholics, of course, and non-Catholics especially.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?