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Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy Paperback – June 19, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0826216618 ISBN-10: 0826216617

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: University of Missouri (June 19, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826216617
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826216618
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,715,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Powerful and engaging. . . . A valuable contribution to our greater understanding of the meaning of the Jeffersonian tradition in American political life.”—John Rensenbrink, Professor Emeritus of Government, Bowdoin College

About the Author

 Jeff Taylor teaches political science at the community college in Rochester, Minnesota.


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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Robert Barta on September 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
Jeff Taylor's book is an excellent history of the Democratic party, exploring its history through the ideologies of Jefferson, William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humpherey. Taylor views Bryan as the last of the populist, middle America Democrats, the type of isolationist, anti-Supreme Court, pro-direct democracy and pro-small government Democrat that is very rare in today's world. Humpherey, and by implication the usual nominees of the Democrats of today, represents a pro-globalist, pro-mass immigration (in spite of its impact on wages), often pro-war, pro-corporate pro-big government, pro-activist Supreme Court. Concerning religion, Bryan also represented a pro-Christian, albeit a populist, "social" Christian outlook that is sorely lacking among current Democratic nominees, though not among its electorate, as is proven by the votes of Democratic leaning voters in referenda and opinion polls on issues as diverse as immigration, abortion and same sex marriage.

Taylor argues that Democratic leaders of today are "Hamiltonians", believers in the concept of a strong central government. Democrats of today would argue that they might be Hamiltonians, but for Jeffersonian ends, i.e. they are for a big federal government but because of the good it will do for the common man. Taylor addresses the validity of this issue somewhat, though I'd like to see more disscussion of just who benefits from big government. I love his analysis of why Democrats have lost their way in terms of their hiding behind the activist Warren courts of the 50's and 60's to get their legislative dirty work accomplished. Taylor points out that it represents a dangerous approach, something that Bryan, with his support of direct democracy (i.e.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Chad I on October 10, 2006
Format: Paperback
Jeff Taylor's book is a must read for anyone who is interested in answering the question why the Democratic Party has struggled so much in national elections since 1950. His analysis of the terms Liberal and Conservative and how little they truly mean these days helps to clear away the misconceptions that are perpetuated by most pundits. Taylor is able to cut through the glossy veneer of platitudes used by both parties and substantiate that the Democratic Party of today has become disconnected from its populist origins. This is an outstanding work of scholarship. As a history professor, I highly recommend this book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dawn Mendolia on January 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is very knowlageable in the comparison between Bryan and Humphrey. This book makes you think. I don't agree with everything in the book but as Dr. Taylor has a middle of the road ideology and I have a more liberal one we wouldn't agree on some of his reasoning.

Each chapter goes indepth of different aspects of the idologies of Bryan and Humphrey. In the final chapter Taylor compares the Democratic Party's present stance and future. He states that the Democratic party, even though it started out with a Jeffersonian approach, has now turned into a Hamiltonian party. I disagree with the exception of FDR.

This is a very good book. It gives you the tools to use your brain and come up with your own conclusions. Great read for students and political scientists.
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful By J. Taylor on November 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
Read this book, and you just might join the Democratic party again, or form your own. St. Jude smiles on lost causes, and this is a book that might renew your faith in a few.

Amazon readers, I have always told you the truth and never lied to you, except for entertainment purposes and always with full disclosure. In the interest of which, please be advised that I am not the same Jeff Taylor who wrote this excellent book. I wrote two others instead; it's a common name. So far, I've tallied seven Jeff Taylors working in the fields of writing and journalism. Perhaps someday we'll gather and pool notes. In the meantime, I'd recommend this book if it were written by Joe Smith.

If you have reached a point of fatalism where your angst about politics has reached a fricking nadir or zenith, I humbly direct you to this book, written by Jeff Taylor, of whom (I hereby swear) I know not one iota of biographical data. We have never communicated in any way. Just happen to have the same name, and be authors of books.

If you want to find out how things went so far sideways and downhill after Carter and Clinton, if you'd like to connect some interesting dots,find your way out of the maze of what-happened, read this book. Buy it for those pathetic, lovable idealists who have let the Kerry/Edwards decal moulder on the back bumper of their Volvo Subaru Outwagon, and who probably feel like closet Republicans and who automatically pull green on the voting slots, out of guilt. (But they haven't read John Edwards' book, Home. Too busy working and worrying about personal death. They haven't read this book, either.)

Give it to them. Buy this book, wrap it for the holidays, and put it in the hands of your intelligent friends.
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3 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Herbert Barger on August 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
This excellent book outlines the various phases that the Democratic Party has transitioned through the ages since it's founding by Thomas Jefferson. This is a study in Jeffersonism and includes many pages of notes and references. It takes us through the period of William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humphrey as well as some interesting facts about Thomas Jefferson.

As A Jefferson Family Historian who assisted with the Jefferson-Hemings DNA Study,I was immediately taken with the clarity and thorougness of the author's extensive research on the topics of slavery, religion and the DNA Study.

He elaborates on the first lies by a disreputable reporter and the historical and conjecture and psychological guesswork, unorthodox and questionable conclusions in a book popular among nonacademics but widely dismissed by scholars. Most historians rejected her theory concerning Jefferson and Hemings. The Nature Journal article mischaracterized the DNA results. The historian cowriting this article seemed motivated at least by a desire to excuse the sexual and legal misconduct of the then-current White House occupant. This refers Professor Joseph Ellis who was later exposed by the Boston Globe for lying to his Mt. Holyoke College students about his NON Vietnam service and other personal misstatements. His Nature article was also mistated grosely.

The author points out that an interesting and underreported twist, the DNA tests essentially disproved any genetic tie between Jefferson and the focus of the original Callender allegation, Sally Hemings. DNA proved NO DNA match and thus the long claimed Tom Woodson of family lore and misguided and biased films and TV specials are just that, FICTION. Mr.
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