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Where the Jobs Are: Entrepreneurship and the Soul of the American Economy Hardcover – September 16, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (September 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118573242
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118573242
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,137,743 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Three years ago John Dearie and Courtney Geduldig, whoboth worked for the Financial Services Forum, which representsAmerica’s biggest financial institutions, came up with aninspired idea. Why not ask entrepreneurs themselves what is goingwrong? Both big multinationals and established small firms havelots of representatives in Washington, DC. Entrepreneurs are toobusy inventing their companies to spend time lobbying. The pairorganized meetings and conducted lots of polls. Across a vast anddiverse country they heard the same message from everyone theyasked: entrepreneurship is in a parlous state. And everyone pointedto the same problems. The result is a new book, “Where theJobs Are”, which should be dropped onto the heads ofAmerica’s squabbling politicians.”
The Economist

From the Inside Flap

During the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and the difficult yearthat followed, nearly 9 million American jobs were eliminated. Thedamage to U.S. labor markets was the most extensive, in bothabsolute and percentage terms, since the Great Depression,destroying all employment growth over the prior decade. Just asalarming—and in stark contrast to the historical pattern ofdeep recessions being followed by sharp rebounds—more thanfour years into the recovery, economic growth remains stalled and24 million working-age Americans remain jobless, underemployed, orhave left the workforce discouraged.

Perhaps most worrying, Washington seems out of ideas. Havingdone what history teaches must be done, policymakers now seem at aloss for what to do next.

With the hope of generating new policy alternatives, co-authorsJohn Dearie and Courtney Geduldig launched an effort in April of2011 to understand the nature and scope of the damage to U.S. labormarkets and, if possible, identify new ways to enhance theeconomy's job-creating capacity. Shortly after they began theirinvestigation, they learned of research that demonstrates howvirtually all net new job creation in the United States over thepast 30 years has come from businesses less than a yearold—true "start-ups."

Stunned, they realized that Washington policymakers too oftenoverlook and neglect the economy's true engine of jobcreation—new businesses. Investigating further, they alsolearned that America's job creation machine is faltering, with therate of start-up formation declining precipitously in recentyears.

To find out why, they launched an ambitious summer roadtrip—conducting roundtables with entrepreneurs in 12 citiesacross the nation. More than 200 entrepreneurs participated inthese roundtables, explaining in specific terms the obstacles thatare undermining their efforts to launch new businesses, expandexisting young firms, and create jobs. Dearie and Geduldig cameaway from their summer journey struck most of all by the nation'sstunning entrepreneurial dynamism. Another majortakeaway—which is enormously significant from the standpointof potential policy solutions—is that entrepreneurs fromAustin to Boston and from Seattle to Orlando face the same burdens,frustrations, and difficulties.

The summer on the road with American entrepreneurs made severalcritical realities vividly clear: First, young businesses areextremely fragile, and yet, those new businesses that survive tendto grow and create jobs at very rapid rates. Second, the policyneeds and priorities of new businesses are unique. Policiesintended to enhance the circumstances of large corporations or evenexisting small businesses—however well intended—oftenmiss the needs of new businesses. Third, policy help for America'sjob creators is urgently needed. Given the critical role they playin our nation's economy, America's young businesses need acomprehensive and preferential policy framework designed tocultivate and nurture start-ups.

Fortunately, Dearie and Geduldig now know what needs to be done.Meeting and listening to America's entrepreneurs revealed withunprecedented clarity and precision the major obstacles underminingtheir ability to launch new businesses, grow those businesses, andcreate new American jobs. In Where the Jobs Are, theypresent 30 specific policy proposals based on what the nation's jobcreators told them they need. The resulting policy agenda amountsto an altogether new, uniquely credible, and vitally important gameplan for unleashing the job creating capacity of America's powerfulentrepreneurial economy and putting a beleaguered nation back towork.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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A must read for anyone who cares about the future of the US economy.
Gary Shapiro
This book is an endeavor to bring them to the policy table and discover what really 'moves the needle' in creating jobs.
J. Thomas Ranken
Interesting hypothesis, but counter to most economic thought, and no real evidence is presented.
John Callister

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mark Jean on October 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Required reading for anyone who cares about the world children will inherit from us. Jobs are more important than political dogma.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brett Coffee on October 4, 2013
Format: Hardcover
The US economy remains stuck in neutral, Washington is broken, people are hurting because they can't find jobs and we can't seem to deal with the dislocations of the last several years. Well, politicians can't figure out how to help the situation, but instead have created a lot of the problems that real businesses have to cope with instead of going out and growing their businesses and creating jobs. Well, this book is filled with real-world descriptions from small business owners from across the country to understand the problems they have been dealing with, and more important some common-sense ways to get those problems out of the way so our business owners can start creating the jobs that the entire economy depends on. A non-partisan book filled with actual solutions, it's a must-read for everyone who cares about the economy. Washington insiders would also benefit to understand how real people are being hurt, and how they might actually help clear the road blocks to jobs creation.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Woody on October 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Dearing and Geduldig do a great job of framing the issue of the changing economy and jobs. Entrepreneurship has captured the attention of students and unemployed workers. More and more people are eschewing the corporate life and large companies to create value through their own companies. This book walks the reader through the opportunities and challenges to this changing situation, and provides a multitude of viewpoints from those on the front scenes all across the country. They conducted a job discovery roadtrip and interviewed hundreds of top professionals to gain a very unique perspective. Highly recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gary Shapiro on September 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A must read for anyone who cares about the future of the US economy. While politicians all claim to care about job creation, they propose either irrelevant, harmful or tepid solutions. The authors of Where the Jobs Are use hard data to prove that new jobs come mostly from start ups. They then dig deep to figure out how to encourage the creation and success of start ups. Using survey and focus group research of entrepreneurs, they to define roadblocks and potential assists to success. In a helpful bonus they also share creative recommendations which would make entrepreneurs a special class of Americans whose ranks would increase.

As an author of two books on innovation, I agree on its importance as our defining national strategy and unquestionably entrepreneurs are critical to break through innovation which changes lives and produces jobs. Apple, Google, Zynga, Facebook, Group On and hundreds of other successful companies started recently and created tens of thousands of good jobs. We need more of these companies and our government should do everything they can to provide fertile ground for emerging start ups.

The authors present a lot of strong research and facts in a very readable style. They present a strong case for bipartisan action by Congress. I hope readers take note and urge their politicians to act.
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Format: Hardcover
Extremely insightful and on-target. Having worked with start-ups in my last job role this body of worked confirmed that what we were seeing locally and anecdotally was in fact not just local or anecdotal. Great work!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Callister on August 21, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Well, neither of the authors are engineers, and very few, if any, of the people interviewed in the book are American engineers. Removing the cap on H-1B visas is one of their recommendations. Won't that further discourage Americans from pursuing careers in engineering, with an increased supply of technical people, and decreased salaries? No, that will actually increase the number of jobs, somehow (salaries are not mentioned). Interesting hypothesis, but counter to most economic thought, and no real evidence is presented. Reducing income taxes on start-up companies is also proposed. Most start-up companies have no taxable income, so not sure how that will help. The authors clearly feel strongly about the positions they have taken, and it is well written. Fair and balanced, no. If you are an American engineer, or plan to become one, this book will scare you. As usual, the technology have-nots appoint themselves as the policy makers, and engineers are left to twist in the wind.
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