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Where we got the Bible;: Our debt to the Catholic church; Unknown Binding – 1948


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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

This is a two-in-one book that exonerates the Catholic Church from the charge of neglecting the Bible, and that shows the truth of the faith can reach even someone reared in a society burdened with centuries of anti-Catholic prejudice. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Bishop Graham was brought up a Calvinist in Scotland, became a minister, but found himself irresistibly drawn to Catholicism, became a priest, and eventually became a bishop. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 166 pages
  • Publisher: B. Herder Book Company (1948)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007HU17S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,646,479 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Although this book is packed with much information, the author's writing is engaging and convincing.
researcher
Graham's book is not an exhaustive account but rather a historical and reasonable summary of how the bible was compiled by the Catholic Church.
Maka Veli
Readers should note that there are also very good Protestant biblical commentaries and books on the history of the Bible.
James E. Egolf

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Tim Drake VINE VOICE on April 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Reverend Henry G. Graham provides a compelling examination of Scripture and how it came to be as we now know it. The picture that emerges is that while divinely inspired it is the work of human tradition.
This excellent resource explains how the Church compiled the New Testament Canon, the work of the Monks of the early Church, refutes the Protestant argument of the "Bible alone", and explains some of the erroneous Protestant versions of the Bible.
The book also includes Reverend Graham's own conversion story "From the Kirk to the Catholic Church" which the original version does not contain.
No religious bookshelf can be complete without this title.
Although not credited, I served as a freelance editor on the reprinting of this book.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Rick on November 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book. This book accurately shows us where the Bible came from, and in addition to that, it brings to our attention things that we usually do not hear about. Such as how the scribes of the Christian Church were Catholic Monks and Nuns. Before the printing press, Bibles had to be copied by hand. It was through the tireless efforts of Catholic Monks and Nuns that the Bible was made available for all to read. These men and women are the unsung heros of all Christian people that love the Bible. I am glad that I read this book so that I can appreciate that fact.
I also loved the author's linguistic style and his humor. This book actually made me laugh a few times. I highly recommend this book for anyone that wants an HONEST history of the Christian Bible and is not afraid to find out the truth.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By James E. Egolf VINE VOICE on March 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Father Graham's book titled WHERE WE GOT THE BIBLE is a short explanation of how the Early Church Fathers edited, redacted, and organized what is bascially the Christian Bible. This is not a "scholarly" book in that it was bascially written for laymen and those who are not familiar with the gradual development of the Christian Bible.

This early Catholic Church "Fathers" were primarily responsible for the organization and early translation of the Bible. As readers may know one of the first if not the first "official" Catholic Bible was the Vulgate Bible which was organized by St. Jerome 354-430). The Early Church Fathers carefully and patiently examined this translation which was based on Hebrew and Greek sources. For example, the Early Church Fathers held councils in Hippo and Carthage in 393, 397, and 419 to "finalize" this Bible. The contention that the Catholic Bible was originally translated into Latin so keep "the masses" ignorant of biblical literature is in error. Readers should remember that Latin was the language of the Roman Empire, and most of Western European barbarians had no exact written language.

The argument that there was no Catholic Church until the reign of Constantine's reign (306-330)is erronous. St. Ignatius (d 107) mentions the Catholic Church in a letter he wrote shortly before he was martyred. There were bishops and claiments to the position of Pope before Constantine. In other words, there is a valid claim that the Catholic Church authorities did organize the Christian Bible.

While the Vulgate Bible was a translation into Latin, Father Graham makes clear that during the early Middle Ages, the Catholic monks also engaged in producing vernacular translations of the Bible based on the Latin Vulgate.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Laura L. Dunn on March 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
I had no idea what the origin of the Bible was. I was stunned to read "Where We Got the Bible"--how logical and straight forward it really was. This book is a very quick read. I was stunned that Protestants used such ridiculous arguments against the Catholic Church (like the Catholic Church "keeping the Bible away from the masses by chaining it up"). I was utterly unfamiliar with these objections. Since reading this book, however, I have run into these misconceptions and are able to enlighten others.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
No, the Bible did not drop out of Heaven one day. This book wonderfully shows where the Bible comes from, and why it is the Catholic Church from which it originates. Graham takes a good look at all the major issues involved: history, the proto-Reformers (Tyndale, Wycliff, etc.), the councils, private interpretation, Luther's elimination of 7 books, the abundance of (German) vernacular translations before Luther, etc. Easy read, and well worth the money. Unfortunately, it does not contain any footnotes.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By robert mcdonald on April 1, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reverand Graham has performed a wonderful exercise in demonstrating the evolution of the Catholic Bible. He shows that this is the same bible inspired by God that protestants use except the protestants, by the will of man, have added to or deleted sections of the Original to satisfy their agendas.
Reverand Graham reveals the biblical origin from the perspective of a Presbyterian minister who converted to Catholicism which adds to the credibility of his argument. I think it is a great way to begin to understand the development of Christianity.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on December 5, 2013
Format: Paperback
The Right Rev. Henry G. Graham also wrote "Hindrances to Conversion to the Catholic Church and Their Removal" [not currently available on Amazon]. This book was first published in 1911. He wrote in the Preface, "This little book about the Bible grew out of lectures which the writer delivered on the subject to mixed audiences. The lectures were afterwards expanded, and appeared in a series of articles in the Catholic press 1908-1909, and are now with slight alterations reprinted. Their origin will sufficiently account for the colloquial style employed thgouthout."

He states, "What [Jesus] commanded and meant them to do was precisely what He had done Himself, viz.---deliver the Word of God to the people by the living voice---convince, persuade, instruct, convert them by addressing themselves face to fact to living men and women; not intrust their message to a dead book which might perish and be destroyed, and be misunderstood and corrupted, but adopt the more safe and natural way of presenting the truth to them by word of mouth, and of training others to do the same after they themselves were gone, and so by a living tradition, preserving and handing down the Word of God as they had received it, to all generations." (Pg. 18)

About the biblical canon, he points out, "there was a class---and Protestants should particularly take notice of the fact, as it utterly undermines their Rule of Faith 'the Bible and the Bible only'---of books that were disputed, controverted, in come places acknowledged, in others rejected... in some parts of the Christian world they were suspected, though in others unhesitatingly received as genuine.
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