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Where's Harry?: Steve Stone Remembers 25 Years with Harry Caray Hardcover – April 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing; First Edition edition (April 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0878332332
  • ISBN-13: 978-0878332335
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #609,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Innocuous anecdotes and remembrances abound in this valentine to the legendary sports broadcaster Harry Caray. Stone worked alongside Caray for 15 years, offering color commentary for Chicago Cubs baseball games, until Caray's death in February 1998. Stone obviously enjoyed the experience, deferring to Caray's antics and malapropisms the way one would an eccentric uncle or spoiledbut talentedchild. Stone claims in the introduction that he wanted to give a clearer picture of Caray the man, rather than Caray the broadcaster, but the book, co-written with Rozner (a sports columnist and co-author of Ryne Sandberg's autobiography Second to Home, not reviewed) avoids deep insight or controversy by offering sketchy biographic facts about Caray: he was born Harry Christopher Carabina, was orphaned at a young age, grew up impoverished, and had an active nightlife, three marriages, and health problems. The books focus is on snapshots of Caray at work and at play (often with stars, from Mickey Mantle to Elvis). The most amusing stories demonstrate Caray's abilities as master showman and promoter in the broadcast booth (he mentioned as many fans' names as possible in order to ``make some friends and sell more tickets and get better ratings''). And while Caray-isms (such as ``There's danger here Cheri!'' or ``The big possum walks late'') may not be as famous as Yogi Berra-isms (although Caray is credited here with originating the ``Holy Cow'' cry), they do demonstrate Caray's charm and help explain his enormous popularity. Where's Harry? (the often-asked question Stone would get from fans), though not a definitive biography, will appeal to fans of Caray and baseball who want to relax one last time with a genuine character of the game, and perhaps hum Caray's signature song, ``Take Me Out to the Ball Game,'' after they're done. The foreword is by Bob Costas. (photos, not seen) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Review

...without question a book worth reading. (Chicago Sun-Times)

Caray's sidekick cuts loose with dozens of hilarious and incredible tales of Chicago's most popular sports personality. (USA Today Baseball Weekly)

...captures the fun, nostalgia, and occasional plain silliness that baseball is all about...qualifies as a great baseball book. If you loved Harry, or if you love baseball, read it. (Chicago Tribune)

...will appeal to fans of Caray and baseball who want to relax one last time with a genuine character of the game, and perhaps hum Caray's signature song, 'Take Me Out to the Ball Game,' after they're done. (Kirkus Reviews)

'Life with Harry was certainly never dull,' Steve Stone writes, and he proves the point in his anecdotal biography of the legendary sportscaster Harry Caray. (Peggy Constantine The New York Times Book Review)

I hate to use an old cliche, but you can't put it down. (Jim Riggs Jamestown Post-Journal)

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Customer Reviews

Any fan of baseball or story-telling will love this book.
Arch Gregory Wolfe
Steve Stone provides the reader with a honest and open perspective of Harry Caray.
L. Charles Wimer III
This book will make you laugh cry, and just say "wow".
"jbwilson19"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Stamper VINE VOICE on June 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I wasn't a Cub fan growing up, but I watched the WGN games almost everyday in the summer and I came to enjoy the broadcast team of Harry and Steve. Steve Stone is one of the most underrated broadcasters on television and the anecdotes he provides for the book are truly gems.
Steve loved Harry quite a bit, and blasts former Cub play by play man Milo Hamilton who was particularly ugly to Harry before and after his death. But the subtext of the early chapters is that Harry had some flaws, and Harry and Steve had their ups and downs during their career together. It would have been easy to gloss over that reality, but it's a credit to Stone that he paints a very human picture of a baseball legend.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Dimond on January 19, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Steve Stone's book helps the average Cubs fan better understand where Harry came from. There were great stories I never heard (Michael Jordon at Wrigley refusing to go up to the booth: "I don't want Harry introducing me as Michael Jackson") and great insights into why Harry acted as he did. He was human but always respected and revered the game of baseball, even when the Cubs had bad years. I don't think Harry will ever be forgotten.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By therosen VINE VOICE on January 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Steve Stone was Harry Carey's straight man for many years. In a sense, he was Harry's Norton. In this book, he tells the shadow's story, including the ups and down.
On the humorous side, Steve discusses Harry's struggle to remember names, and how he tormented Arnie (the producer) with his requests.
Steve also paints the image of Harry the promoter, explaining how in his way, Harry promoted the character that Steve was to play on the air. Stone also admits that he owes his job in many ways to Harry. That they stayed together for 15 years is a tribute to a partnership that in many ways seemed like a marriage.
Some of the things you may not know... With only a very rare exception, he didn't drink on TV, but kept the Bud glass a plug for his sponsors. That he always paid when we went out, even though he'd plug his favorite watering holes.
Steve also covers the dark side of Harry - how he handled grudges. How he'd insist on being the prima donna. Their petty fights, and how they'd get over them. His ostracism and eventual reconciliation with his family.
In the end, you're left with both a fitting and realistic picture of the icon.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Reds Fan on July 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Don't think that you need to be a Cubs' fan to enjoy this book.
I actually chose to read this book for a class paper on great American journalists. I had a hard time convincing my professor that Harry was indeed a journalist and not simply an entertainer. After thoroughly enjoying this book, I think I convinced the prof - I got a 99% on the paper.
If you have a love for the game of baseball, you will surely find this book entertaining. As someone now in sports communications with a professional baseball team, I recommend this book to all my co-workers. It's a great way to learn about aspects of the game that most fans would never know about - and it's about a guy everyone feels they already know.
Perhaps one of the most disappointing things about biographies is that they somehow tarnish the memory or reputation of the book's subject. This book will simply make you love Harry even more.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I absolutely loved this book! I couldn't put it down. Not only did it bring back some wonderful memories, but I found myself laughing out loud almost constantly. Steve Stone did a wonderful job. Thank you Steve for sharing your stories with us!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 4, 1999
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I absolutely loved this book. I laughed, I cried and then did some more laughing. Even if you are not a die hard Cubs fan, this is one book you must have. Steve Stone did a great job showing us the side of Harry we didn't get to see.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Harry Caray introduced me to baseball as I sat recovering from a traffic accident. For three days, I sat on a couch and watched baseball, courtesy of a friend's satellite dish. I was hooked not just by the sport, the voice or the myth but by the way Harry brought baseball right into the living room. The phrase that did it: "One more biscuit for breakfast and that ball would have been out of here!" Being a Bud man myself, and a Cubs fan, Stoney's collection of Harry tales is a classic. So grab a nice cold Budweiser, put on the game and spend a few minutes visiting Harry just one more time.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael P. Weber on July 22, 1999
Format: Hardcover
If you ever heard Harry Caray broadcast a game, you couldn't forget him. Many had the chance, from 1945 through 1997 to hear his work. I grew up in the Midwest of the 50's and 60's, fascinated by sports on the radio. I spent hours going across the dial at night, listening to Bob Elson do the White Sox, Ernie Harwell the Tigers, Vince Lloyd and Lou Boudreau the Cubs, and even stopping by to catch Halsey Hall on the Twins and the Dallas-Fort Worth Spurs on WBAP out of Texas. The place I stopped consistently was 1120 on the AM dial, KMOX. That's where I was captivated by the obvious enthusiasm and descriptive abilities of Harry Caray calling the Cardinals' games with Jack Buck. His call of the Cardinals' run at the Dodgers in the 1963 stretch run -- and their miracle comeback of 1964 are still vivid in my mind. Indeed, Harry's broadcasts inspired me to pursue my own career in sportscasting, which has taken me through 27 years and I hope many more. In his later years with the Cubs, Harry wasn't as sharp as he had been, but he still had the enthusiasm. Whenever I had the chance to tune him in, I did, especially to catch his seventh inning stretch singing of "Take Me out to the Ballgame." That brought back so many great memories, and oftimes tears as well. Steve Stone was Harry's partner, friend, and sometimes confidante over Harry's last 15 years. He does a marvelous job detailing Harry's personality, his zealous approach to his job, and his dealing with his stroke in 1987. Harry was special. The way Steve Stone reveals their behind-the-scenes dealings is special as well. It was a most enjoyable read.
Pete Weber Nashville Predators Play-by-Play
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