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Whistling the Morning in: New Poems Hardcover – September, 1992


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press; 1st edition (September 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 156397035X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563970351
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,460,192 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-6-- Bland is the word that best characterizes this slim collection of 29 nature poems. A mixture of free verse and rhyming selections ruminate on the sun, morning, clouds, wind, etc. Nine of the poems have been previously published. While there is effective use of metaphor and simile in some of the pieces, most are pedestrian; none is truly memorable. All share the same dull tone of mild wonder at the forces of nature. "Proposal" praises the breeze "for introducing new/ interesting air/ into our nostrils," but doesn't say what makes it interesting. "A Kind of Tenderness" likens rain on the windowpane to fingers and then a tear. Much of the free verse reads like prose, with only the arbitrary spacing of lines suggesting poetry. About a third of the entries consist of six lines or less; of these, some end abruptly and seem incomplete, failing to convey either mood or thought. The colorful, impressionistic illustrations that appear on almost every page are more appealing than the text they accompany. More verve and imagination exists in Morrison's The Sidewalk Racer , and Other Poems of Sports and Motion (Lothrop, 1977). Richer examples of nature poetry can be found in a number of good anthologies, such as Booth's 'Til All the Stars Have Fallen (Viking, 1990) or Chorao's Baby's Good Morning Book (Dutton, 1990), aimed at slightly younger readers. --Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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