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69 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story
This is a great story that I have read many times. It is one of those books that I fall back on when I need a comforting story to read.
It follows the life of one poor dog as he moves from one master to another, and even ends up as a fighting dog at one point. Its a bit like "Black Beauty" I guess seeing as it follows an animals life, but white fang is more of a...
Published on January 6, 2010 by Cheryl Koopmann

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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising start, unforgivable finish
With the publication of White Fang in 1906, Jack London wisely capitalized on the great success of his previous novel The Call of the Wild. These two books can be considered companion volumes, and are often bundled into one volume, since they both feature a canine protagonist. The plots of the two novels are parallel, though inverted. The Call of the Wild tells the tale...
Published on September 23, 2011 by Karl Janssen


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69 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story, January 6, 2010
This review is from: White Fang (Kindle Edition)
This is a great story that I have read many times. It is one of those books that I fall back on when I need a comforting story to read.
It follows the life of one poor dog as he moves from one master to another, and even ends up as a fighting dog at one point. Its a bit like "Black Beauty" I guess seeing as it follows an animals life, but white fang is more of a story. White Fang is not just some docile horse but a real wild dog that has survived where others haven't. A great read and a great story.
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58 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Adventure in the Wild, December 3, 2003
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This review is from: White Fang (Puffin Classics) (Paperback)
As a boy I used to love books like this, about untamed nature and woodlore and woodcraft, but it has been many years since I've read them. I recently had the occasion to revisit this excellent novel, and found that it has aged quite well and is still a terrific read.
The story has to do with a wolf named White Fang, and begins before he was born, with his father and mother leading a pack in the dead of winter in the frozen Canadian wilderness. There is no game around and all are starving. They harass and harry a beleaguered dog-sled team over the course of several days, picking the dogs off one by one, then finally surrounding the one remaining man. He builds a ring of fire to protect himself from these ravenous wolves, but knows he soon must succumb to exhaustion. He notices the she-wolf, sitting patiently outside the ring, seemingly indifferent--except for the string of drool coming out of her mouth in anticipation of making a meal out of him.
That is the lesson here, in this story of White Fang. It is a savage world, a world in which you either kill or are killed, eat or are eaten. His first day out of the den he kills and eats a small bird, then in turn is almost eaten by a hawk. He observes a porcupine roll itself into a ball to defend itself against a lynx, then observes the lynx yowl in pain after foolishly getting stung. The lynx plays another prominent role. Trying to survive a typical lean winter, White Fang's mother takes the desperate step of going to the absent lynx's den to eat its offspring. The enraged lynx later comes to their den and attacks, but with the help of a growing White Fang, they defeat it. It also becomes a meal.
White Fang eventually gets taken in by men, first an Indian tribe where he is "tamed" with brutality, then by white traders who use him for their own base purposes. Through it all we see the cruel world in which he lives and feel his pain and hunger and anger. It is a well-plotted adventure carefully observed, and serves as a great reminder of how savage the untamed wilderness is, and that mankind is often only a bare step above it.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unmatched, November 28, 1999
By A Customer
This is one of my favorite books. The only other book that might be better is The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, but Jack London has definitely outdone himself this time. It is the story about an animal who is three quarters wolf and a one quarter dog who goes from life as an indian sled dog to a fighting dog owned by a cruel man, to a loving owner who trys to show this maddened savage creature the meaning of love and kindness. What is really unique about White Fang is that it tells of what might be going on in such a creature's head. It tells of what it is like living in a den out in the wild, tells of how White Fang first comprehends the wild and what he learns aboout the law of life. It explains what his first impression of humans, and of the harsh enviorment of all the other puppies and dogs in the camp. It is beautifully written and I would suggest it to anyone who likes long, thought provoking stories about dogs and wolves and the northlands.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the white fang, February 17, 2000
By A Customer
Two men are out in the wild of the north. Their dogs disappear as they are lured by a she-wolf and eaten by the pack. They only have three bullets left and Bill, one of the men, uses them to try and save one of their dogs.He misses and is eaten with the dog. Only Henry and two dogs are left, he makes a fire, trying to drive away the wolves. They draw in close and he is almost eaten, saved only by a company of men who were traveling nearby. The wolves are in the midst of a famine. They continue on, lead by several wolves alongside the she-wolf, and when they finally find food the pack starts to split up. The she-wolf mates with one of the wolves and has a litter of pups.Only one survives after several more famines, and he grows strong and is afeisty pup. They come to an Indian village where the she-wolf's, who is actually half-wolf, half-dog, master is. White Fang is the main character of the book. His mother was half wolf,half dog. His father was full wolf. He starts his life in the wild, but becomes more and more of a dog after he and Kiche, his mother, go to the Indian camp. He is naturally quite strong and agile, but other dogs and humans are mean to him so he turns these skills into fighting skills,becoming fierce and unloved. It is only when he meets Scott, the first human to ever show kindness to him, that his character changes and he becomes a loving dog. This book is about a wolfdog who was born and raised in the wild and has grown up to be a true hero. His first owner was an Indian named Gray Beaver who got tricked into selling him. The man who he got sold to was a crude man named Beauty Smith. Beauty beat White Fang and put him in a cage to fight other dogs. Then a man named Weedon Scott took care of White Fang. White Fang grew up to love Weedon. The two of them moved to Weedon's family's house to stay there. White Fang learned many things in the city and did what Weedon expected. This is a great book, one of the best that I've ever read, so Isuggest you read it!
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars London's companion to "Call of the Wild", October 25, 2005
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This review is from: White Fang (Puffin Classics) (Paperback)
In 1904 London wrote to his editor about his idea for his next book: "Not a sequel to 'Call of the Wild.' But a companion to [it]. I'm going to reverse the process. Instead of a devolution or decivilization of a dog, I'm going to give the evolution, the civilization of a dog--development of domesticity, faithfulness, love, morality, and all the amenities and virtues."

That, in a nutshell, is the plot of "White Fang." And because London designed the books to be mirror images, the second book is almost inevitably compared to the first (especially because the earlier book is far more widely read). It's a worthy companion (or sequel) to "Call of the Wild," and it imagines in far more detail what life in the wild and in the human world must seem like to a dog. The opening perspective, too, is different; while "Call of the Wild" begins when Buck is a young dog, "White Fang" opens before the hero is born, describing a famine that afflicts his half-wolf mother and full-wolf father and continuing through his birth and puppy-hood.

The action for "White Fang" picks up noticeably when the young wolf stumbles upon a tribe of nomadic Indians. From there, his life is beyond his control, changing hands from owner to owner, first as a sled dog and then as a fighting dog, until he is rescued by a humane master. More than twice as long as "Call of the Wild," "White Fang" describes many more adventures and characters. At the same time, what distinguishes "Call of the Wild" is its powerful, insightful brevity; here, London's imaginings are more expansive. Even as London philosophizes about human life allegorically, through the mind of the dog, his passages at times border on exaggerated anthropomorphism, such as when White Fang sees San Francisco for the first time: "Through it all, behind it all, was man, governing and controlling, expressing himself, as of old, by his mastery over matter. It was colossal, stunning. White Fang was awed. Fear sat upon him. . . . As never before, he felt his dependence on the love-master, close at whose heels he followed, no matter what happened never losing sight of him."

Revisiting "White Fang" for the first time since I was a teenager, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it--in spite of the its occasional heavy-handed prose. Even more unexpected (especially for those of us who have read a lot of fiction by Jack London), is the novel's sentimental ending, which will probably bring a tear to many an eye. But it's not just a kid's book--or, more accurately, maybe it's just written for the child in all of us.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars London at his best, April 18, 2000
Masterfully done, White Fang is ultimately a story of love. The cruelty and hardship and bitterness of the Wild, bored into the very essence of a wolf-dog named White Fang, whose heart is turned cold as stone by the cruel hand of man and of the Wild. A killer, more wolf than dog; even his own kind turned against him. His mother taken away before his very eyes when he was only a puppy; reunited years later, even she does not recognize him and turns her back on him, as have all of his kind, growling and snarling at him; the enemy of his kind. Hatred towards every living thing posesses him, until he does not even remember what love is.
It is not until a man named Weedon Scott appears, and saves White Fang from certain death, that White Fang's life is changed. Scott is the opposite of all that he had come to know in life, and very, very gradually, White Fang comes to know love, for the very first time.
This story stays as one of my favorite, and the best, pieces of literature of all time, and anyone who has not read it is sincerely missing out. White Fang, is definately, Jack London at his best.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging, February 22, 2010
This review is from: White Fang (Kindle Edition)
This is a great, engaging book. The story of a wolf-dog mix who is born in the arctic, learns life as a wild wolf, and then meets humans ("gods")and has to adapt to survive. Told from the wolf's point of view, it is easy to see why this is a classic. It is very believable and you can almost feel the pain that White Fang has in trying to survive and learn the laws of life with humans.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Leaving the Wild, April 11, 2010
This review is from: White Fang (Paperback)
Jack London intended for "White Fang" to read as a companion piece to his wildly successful novel, "The Call of the Wild," yet he also intended that the two stories be opposites of each other. While "The Call of the Wild" was about a civilized dog becoming wild, "White Fang" would be about a wild dog becoming civilized. While just as poetic and unique as "The Call of the Wild," "White Fang" definitely reads as the lesser of the two.

The story begins with a wild wolf pack following a sled team of dogs and their two men, the hungry wolves patiently picking off one dog after another until they can pick off the men as well. The story then moves to the courtship between two wolves and the eventual birth of the gray cub who will become White Fang. White Fang and his mother, who used to be a somewhat civilized dog, are retaken by the Indian tribe that she used to belong to, and White Fang gets his first taste of life with humans. As a wolf, he is different than the other dogs and is mistreated by them. He leads a relatively happy and comfortable life until he is sold to the cowardly beast, Beauty Smith, who trains White Fang to be a fighter. His redemption is assured when he is rescued during a gruesome fight by Weedon Scott and his fortunes change for the better.

"White Fang" is a uniquely told story, given mainly from the perspective of its title character. London's writing is descriptive and poetic, but sometimes too repetitive as if he could not think of another way to describe a character or situation. The tale drags at some points, not moving as quickly as "The Call of the Wild," but is still a relatively fast-paced and enjoyable read. "White Fang" is definitely not a children's story just because it is a "dog" story. Its content and themes are marked by a darkness that makes it much more appropriate for older readers. In fact, labeling London's works as children's stories has done them a great disservice.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story of survival, White Fang., October 30, 2000
A Kid's Review
The book White Fang, by Jack London is a excellent novel about survival, love, and loyalty. White Fang, a cross between a wolf and a dog must learn to survive in the void of the north. He is found by Indians and soon becomes one of their dogs. There he fights often with the other dogs and soon becomes feared because of his fighting ability. He then travels to a place where he is sold to a man that uses him only for fighting. He ultimatly loses a fight to a bulldog, being almost killed in the process. After the fight he is bought by Weedon Scott who teaches him the true meaning of love. The main character is White Fang, a cross between a wolf and a dog. He is big for a dog. He is very capable of surviving in the wild. London has developed him very well and I think that he may be the best character in all of Londons writings. I would recomend this book to anyone and everyone with an interest in reading. I think that many more schools should include this book in their curriculum. It shows the reader that life is not a stroll in the park. Many more people need to realize that. Hopefully, the book will help readers learn that they need to work to survive, no matter where they are.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising start, unforgivable finish, September 23, 2011
By 
Karl Janssen (Olathe, KS United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: White Fang (Kindle Edition)
With the publication of White Fang in 1906, Jack London wisely capitalized on the great success of his previous novel The Call of the Wild. These two books can be considered companion volumes, and are often bundled into one volume, since they both feature a canine protagonist. The plots of the two novels are parallel, though inverted. The Call of the Wild tells the tale of a domesticated dog's gradual transformation into a wild animal. In White Fang, a wolf-dog born in the wild makes the opposite journey from savage to tame. Despite the kinship between the two novels, White Fang does not possess the emotional resonance, philosophical depth, or literary excellence of The Call of the Wild. If it had not ridden upon the coat tails of its predecessor, this book would likely have disappeared from print like many of London's lesser-known works.

The narrative of White Fang begins before the birth of the title dog, with the mating of his parents. The resulting pup, 3/4 wolf and 1/4 domestic dog, is born amid the harsh wilderness of the North. He spends his puppyhood learning the ways of the wolf, until an encounter with a Native American encampment introduces him to the world of man. The first dozen chapters or so read not so much as a novel but more like an essay on natural history. London vividly describes the behaviors of wolves with scientific clarity, all told through the eyes of the young wolf cub. The first half of White Fang presents some of London's most vividly naturalistic writing, crammed with painstakingly detailed descriptions of natural processes, all expressed in beautiful prose. The plot is exciting and leads the reader down unexpectedly savage and brutal paths. As the book continues and White Fang becomes more and more domesticated, however, the story becomes less and less interesting. The further the narrative departs from the wild, the less it grandly propounds upon the universal fatalistic beauty of nature's order, and the more it devolves into just another adventure story about a dog.

The book peaks at about its middle, then progressively goes steadily downhill, then it just plain falls off a cliff. The final chapter of White Fang is absolutely horrible. It is so far removed from the rest of the book that it totally betrays the integrity of everything that came before it. It's as if London couldn't think of a way to finish the book, so he just tacked a short story onto the end, and not a particularly good short story at that. London creates a totally new character, not previously mentioned in the book, because he needs some device upon which to build a melodrama. The last chapter totally abandons the naturalistic tone of the novel and replaces it with the feeling of a sensationalistic soap opera.

I've read most of London's works and, in case you couldn't tell from the previous paragraph, this is not one of my favorites, but it does have its merits. The first half shines with occasional moments of brilliance, and is quite worthy of reading. If you haven't read The Call of the Wild, I would strongly suggest you read that first or instead. Only if you really enjoy that book would I suggest you seek out White Fang, and then don't be surprised if you find it disappointing.
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White Fang (Puffin Classics)
White Fang (Puffin Classics) by Jack London (Paperback - November 1, 1994)
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