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58 Reviews
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good
This was a pretty good book, but i think Higgins could have done better. Oh yes, for the most part the story was exciting and kept you turning the pages, but some parts just went to quickly..Higgins should have built up to it a bit more, or put some more action into it..Also, he took too long to pull everything together...it was way to quick in the beginning, and then...
Published on July 20, 2000 by Peter Sherrill

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent light reading
Lady Helen, a geriatric British aristocrat, gains revenge on people involved in the killing of her son. While not very believable, and not one of Higgin's better works, it's a quick and mostly enjoyable read with familiar characters. The two major annoyances throughout the book were:
1. EVERY character talks about the joys of smoking. It appeared to be a paid...
Published on December 29, 2001 by W. Fish


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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, July 20, 2000
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
This was a pretty good book, but i think Higgins could have done better. Oh yes, for the most part the story was exciting and kept you turning the pages, but some parts just went to quickly..Higgins should have built up to it a bit more, or put some more action into it..Also, he took too long to pull everything together...it was way to quick in the beginning, and then it slowed down considerably for about 100 pages, and then at the end picked back up again...The story is about an old lady who's paramilitary-type son was killed by IRA branch terrorists years ago, and she finally learns the terrible truth behind his grizzly murder. Driven by rage, and the realization that her life was near its end, she goes on a mad killing spree against the people that killed her son..Our favorite Irishman, Sean Dillon is involved, along with his good friend Blake Johnson, as they try to figure out who the mystery person is that is killing off left-wing terrorists left and right... An exciting tale to say the least, but it could have been put together better..other than that i have no complaints and i do reccomend this book if you especially like Higgins, but if you are a "new kid" then i suggest you start with some of his earlier books..
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent light reading, December 29, 2001
By 
W. Fish (Midwest United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
Lady Helen, a geriatric British aristocrat, gains revenge on people involved in the killing of her son. While not very believable, and not one of Higgin's better works, it's a quick and mostly enjoyable read with familiar characters. The two major annoyances throughout the book were:
1. EVERY character talks about the joys of smoking. It appeared to be a paid advertisement for Marlboros and the emphasis he placed on the dialogue related to smoking detracts from the story.
2. EVERY American character uses British phrases and discusses their love of things British from meat pies to Harrods.
If a friend gives you the book and there isn't anything better to read, it will pass the time.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fast read., December 19, 2000
By 
nobizinfla "nobizinfla" (Windermere, Florida USA) - See all my reviews
Jack Higgins is a terrific storyteller. This was my first Higgins novel and the pages flew by. Reading this book was like eating peanuts...I could not stop and finished in two sessions.
An absolute complete suspension of disbelief is the best way to approach this one as it stretches credulity to beyond the max...but it is great fun. And, what is fiction all about, if not for suspension of disbelief? Some of the situations the protagonists get out of would make James Bond proud.
In the setup, the first quarter of the book is pretty credible and then the fun begins. The action switches between Washington, New York, London and Ireland...lots of Concorde flights, tony parties and champaign between the gun shots. The good guys are interesting characters and the bad guys seem a match for them due to their mole inside the White House. The reader is clued into the mole's identity early on, so we know whodunit...so we have to watch the clock to see if the good guys can figure it out in time.
It was an enjoyable read all in all. The protagonists are continuing characters and it appears their ranks increased by one in "The White House Connections." That's good news for Higgins' fans as he is a prolific writer.
That said, it was "too Brit" and "too IRA" for me to become addicted to the series. It was a fun one-time interlude for someone who prefers the good old American hardboiled mystery. For those who like the British touch, this series is a keeper.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quick Read but Higgins Has Done Better, February 17, 2001
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
In The White House Connection, Jack Higgins, the prolific thriller writer has again reprised former IRA terrorist Sean Dillon, Brigadier Charles Ferguson,Hannah Bernstein and Blake Johnson in a fast paced story where the combined talents of British and American intelligence are used to thwart Irish terrorism.
In this continuation of the Sean Dillon saga, Higgins introduces an unlikely opponent for the combined US/UK intell team as they try to determine who is killing off the Sons of Erin and why. That killer, a woman, is as unlikely as any protagonist Higgins has ever used. Without revealing the person's identity (although the author does so early on), suffice it to say that the concept is improbable and unlikely. It seemed as if Higgins was really reaching for something with this book and the reader needs to suspend disbelief more than is usual for novels of this type.
In the process of leading the reader through the story, Higgins does his usual good job of providing history lessons right where they are needed to give readers the needed background to explain or amplify why he has written a character or scene a certain way. His intertwining of certain historical facts, especially those on Irish rebel history immediately explain why a Protestant Irish American would be a member of the IRA when everyone knows that the enmity between Catholics and Protestants in Ulster is legendary. When Higgins does this, he is at his best.
Another noticeable and at times very annoying feature of this book is that the dialogue Higgins gives the American characters is more British than American. In some cases it is more Irish than American. It almost seems as if Higgins has no knowledge whatever of American idiom and doesn't know how to write using our speech patterns. If you are a fan and doubt this style problem, go back and look closely for it. EVERYONE sounds British. Sean Dillon, the former IRA killer is also inconsistent in his speech patterns as well. Higgins' use of Irish idiom is overdone and also becomes annoying, mostly because it's so unnecessary.
Despite my minor annoyances and critiques here, overall, this is a very enjoyable read. The usual Higgins mastery of scene, atmosphere, characterization, tension and pacing all here. If the reader is familiar with the British cast of characters, this book reads quickly and well because we are all glad to be reunited with Sean Dillon and his boss, Brigadier Charles Ferguson.
Higgins also provides some really despicable opposition to the intelligence folks. One, named Jack Barry is so hoorible that most readers will probably be praying for his death. This is the kind of book one can easily read over a weekend or on the beach. Despite some minor and easily forgivable irritants, THE WHITE HOUSE CONNECTION is another successful and fast ride through the creative mind of Jack Higgins. If he had avoided overuse of British speech patterns and a more than usually unbelievable main character, I would have awarded this book 5 stars; so with these things in mind, I gave it 4 stars.
Fans of Higgins shouldn't miss this one and I recommend to all serious readers of espionage and police procedural novels.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars My First Higgins Read--I'm Impressed and Will Read More!, April 18, 2000
95% of what I read is non-fiction--but living in the D.C. area for eight years, and learning everything I could about the area and its key inhabitants--this book caught my eye. This is my very first Higgins read and I will seek other Higgins books. The author kept me fully engaged on two business flights--I don't even remember the snack on the flight. This book will take you from the White House--to the United Kingdom and back on the Concord or US Government Aircraft, with many plots taking place, key people involved, and many connections on both continents taking place at the same time--you will be itching for the flight to be over--to get the key players where they need to be. The bumper-sticker for this book--"revenge--above the law decision makers--perfection--knowledge is power". A quick, but engaging read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Is it time for Higgins to hang it up?, March 5, 2001
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
I have been reading Higgins off and on since "The Eagle Has Landed" was new, but not recently. I was stunned by this poor effort by a one time very good (but not great) writer. I'm even more surprised by how he was able to slip this one past so many of his obvious fans.
First, I need to dispell one myth here. This is not a fast read as some seem to believe. It is an incredibly short book. The hard cover version came in at just over 300 pages but is virtually double spaced. However, quantity would not matter if there was something of substance here. Unfortunately, the plot has more holes in it than swiss cheese.
Police work is largely a matter of tracking down leads and eliminating suspects. Thanks to computers, cross checking crimes and people's movements is not as problematic as it once was. Early in the story, it is discovered that someone is using an unusual calibar pistol to commit murders on both sides of the Atlantic. The authorities quickly (and correctly) guess that the killer must be using a private plane to get her gun in and out of the US and Britain. Yet they fail to do two things that would seem to be basic. They do not search their computers for other murders with the same, rare gun, and more significantly, they never check the flight plans of private aircraft to provide leads to the killer's identity. (Of course, if they had, this very short book would have been even shorter.)
The killer is identified in the first pages of the book. She is an elderly woman on a mission. She eventually provides a clue to her identity to her primary, intended victim who is the real villian of the book. He should have been able to snap his fingers and either know who she is or find out quickly. Instead, he spends page after page whining about who it could be. At the same time, the authorities are on to him, but he keeps slipping out of their traps, an apparent device to provide another few pages to this dismal excuse for a novel.
Higgins seems to be out of ideas. He has been pushing the same characters at us for decades. It might be time for him to consider resting on his laurels and living the good life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars it drew me in, April 11, 2000
i must say that i really enjoyed this book. soo much that i have since gone back in time and read every higgins book that features dillon from the beginning. what a great group of characters. if you enjoy stories about master disguise artists, this is for you
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Higgins does it again!, July 13, 2000
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this one! It's Sean Dillon to the rescue again. Dillon is like the Energizer Bunny - he just keeps going and going, but he never seems to tire of killing bad guys. I have enjoyed every Higgins book I have ever read - including this one. It kept me guessing who the White House Connection was right up to the end.
A great read! If you're a Higgins fan, this is one not to miss!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK read..., February 27, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) (Mass Market Paperback)
..but not the best. I have difficulties with superheroes who are capable of leaping tall buildings with a single bound, speaking 20 languages fluently and invariably surface from the most incredible mayhem with hardly a scratch. Moreover, coming from Northern Ireland, I have difficulty believing in Sean Dillon as a real product of the province. The story itself is entertaining enough, but lacking in suspense and in basic credibility (the same chameleon-like qualities is shown by Higgins's blue-blooded heroine who adeptly turns her hand to major league assasination, apparently without any problem).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sean Dillon is back - and we're glad, October 11, 1999
By A Customer
I really like Sean Dillon and I am glad that he is back. I enjoyed this book and the characters.
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The White House Connection (Sean Dillon)
The White House Connection (Sean Dillon) by Jack Higgins (Mass Market Paperback - July 1, 2000)
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