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White Owl, Barn Owl Hardcover – April 10, 2007


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Hardcover, April 10, 2007
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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

As in her previous titles, such as Bat Loves the Night (2001), zoologist Davies pulls young kids into the animal world with an atmospheric story that is filled with facts. A young boy helps his grandfather build a box for a barn owl and install it in a nearby tree. Together they wait and watch, and after many evenings, they spot a barn owl flying into their homemade nest, carrying prey for its young. On each spread, fonts in different sizes guide children toward the facts: words in larger typeface tell the story; lines in a smaller font, which resembles handwriting, imparts simple facts about owls' pellets, feathers, body features, and nesting habits. A concluding note tells more about nesting boxes. The poetic, sensory words (the owl's feathers have a "velvety softness") and the realistic, watercolor-and-pastel pictures, especially those of the snow-white bird against the darkening sky, will place kids at the center of the boy's experience even as it heightens their interest in these intriguing animals. Engberg, Gillian
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"*"The best information books are so interesting that they make you want to find out more. The Read and Wonder books do just that." Margaret Meek, Institute of Education" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 660L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick (April 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076363364X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763633646
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 0.4 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,632,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
She helped Grandpa build a large wooden box, but when she asked him what it was for she had to wait. He got a ladder and put the box way up high in an old oak tree then he showed her some special things and talked to her about barn owls. He had seen one and this was hoping the barn owl would make it into a home. Perhaps there would even be babies!

He began to tell her all sorts of interesting facts about them and showed her a barn owl pellet. Inside there were some very odd things like fur and bones, but it was very interesting to learn new things. They kept a watch to see if the owl would climb into the box. They were going to have to be very patient because even though Grandpa knew there were owls nearby you could never tell what a wild animal will do.

Along with this lovely narrative, there is factual information about the barn owl on the opposite page such as "Under their feathers, owls are slim. Their bones are hollow, which keeps their bodies light and makes flying easy." There is even a "real size" drawing of a barn owl pellet. The art work is enchanting and is no surprise this is a nominee for a Vermont Red Clover Award for children in Kindergarten through the fourth grade.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jean on January 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book gave great facts for our study of owls. The kids enjoyed the book and the storyline, but they learned at the same time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Connie VINE VOICE on February 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I have a 2-year-old boy and he loves this book. The illustrations are simple and not over-busy. The story is a wee bit complicated for a child Eddie's age, so I make significant alterations to the text (what does "tussocky" mean??) and I omit entirely the "little words" that are on the illustrated pages. The illustrated pages contain lots of interesting info about owls and nesting boxes and stuff, but it's not interesting to a 2 yr old so I skip it. I also truncate the text that's part of the storytelling narrative. Among other things, my 2 yr old can't understand about the owl's digestive pellets.

It is a really lovely book and can be altered however you need it to be for your child. Two thumbs up.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is a good way to learn about owls because it is written as a story about a child and grandpa making a nest box. There is a little 1-2 sentence fact on each illustration in addition to the story. The last page has extra info on making your own owl nest box. This is a nice book to add a little fiction to an owl unit, but still learn plenty of new things.
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