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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on April 3, 2004
This album was sort of an underrated classic of the early 90's. The most noteable tracks are probably the KLF Theme ( I think it's called justified and ancient ) and "Doctor Who and the Tardis" which contains an amusing sample of Gary Glitters "Rock and Roll". It's sort of tounge and cheek, the album owes a lot to the literary influence of Robert Anton Wilson, author of the classic "Illuminatus!" Trilogy ( conspiracy nuts, like myself, will recognize references to various secret societies in the lyrics. Such as the J.A.M.'s and the A.A.A. ).
It's a fun CD loosely in the vein of other post rock/ post punk reactionaries ( like B.A.D the Mick Jones follow-up to the clash, Age of Chance, and later progenitors like the Shamen ). If you like that stuff, you'll like this. Although, it doesn't get 5 stars in my book because it just didn't have the lasting appeal of albums like B.A.D.'s "medicine show" or Age of Chance's "1000 years of trouble" ( which is impossibly rare to find, and utterly the best of it's kind. Innovative to this day! ). Still White Room is good and worthy of note, regardless. Anybody interested in a dose of sci-fi influenced early 90's dance music will like it. It's an old nugget.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on June 3, 2006
They are very much seen just as another late eighties/early nineties club band, along the lines of 2 Unlimited. A latter day example of what kind of band they are seen as would be Basement Jaxx or Fatboy Slim. Innocuous, fun music that critics and serious music fans don't take seriously.

However, their music is quite good and subtle. Plus there's the fact that they were absolutely crazy and scary weird.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 27, 2012
When I discovered The KLF they had already broken up. Not being British I didn't know this yet. I bought the tape based a half-remembered video and played it nearly every day for months. When I eventually upgraded to CDs it was one of my early purchases. I tracked down many of their other releases, including singles, and when MP3s came to the fore I sussed out their lost tracks and remixes. This one album turned into an obsession with a band so adept at self-mythologizing that I was fully prepared to buy into The KLF, the White Room, and the entire Justified Ancients of Mu Mu concept.

I didn't know dance music when I got the tape. I'd seen the What Time Is Love video once or twice and I'd heard C+C Music Factory, but the rest of my life was rock and whatever pop I couldn't avoid on the radio. When The KLF say they created stadium house, I believe it. That's what this album is: dance music designed to fill stadiums. Designed to be played in stadiums. Designed to be as big as Madonna or Queen. That it never came to that is due more to the idiosyncracies of the Cauty/Drummond duo than anything lacking in their sound. This was dance music that deserved to take over the world. Only their willful departure from the music industry robbed us of that blessing.

That said, only about half the album has a dance feel to it. The rest is slower, moodier, almost bluesy. Not ambient as their classic Chill Out, but significantly more reflective than What Time Is Love. It contributes to their Justified & Ancient mythology and furthers the White Room narrative. Beyond the hugeness of the sound and diversity of the songs, however, is an emotional heft that I can't quite explain. While dance music exists primarily to move bodies on a dancefloor, something in this music, despite its ridiculous story and complete lack of reality, is emotionally affecting. The listener becomes enmeshed in The KLF's quest to find the White Room and becomes invested in the outcome. The journey captures your attention and carries you along with them.

Where previous Jams releases took a jokey approach to this concept, on this album the band plays it straight and revolutionizes dance music in the process. The KLF were big, but they should have been huge. They should have been world beaters. This album should be heard on every radio in America. You should have it already. You should make your own journey to find the White Room.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This is one of the few parts of the 90s that didn't suck. The KLF were so forward-thinking and paradigm-shattering it still boggles the mind. Every track on here is great, especially "3 a.m. Eternal" live at SSL and the LP mix of "Last Train to Transcentral". This is some of the best work from artists who really knew what it means to explore your craft.
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on January 30, 2015
This group is little known, but once you hear one of there big songs like 3 A.M. eternal it should ring a bell. This group had one popular album in the states The White Room. I have the CD and it rocks, The KLF is a cross between pop/rap. I think the whole album is excellent, and I would recommend it to anyone, some songs are better than all; but all albums are like that. If you want to know more about KLF listen to some of their music with the MP3 sampler, you might like them.

THX,
Kris L. CocKayne
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on April 1, 2015
Best acid house British group the klf best songs i like are what time is love, 3a.m. eternal, and, lastly last train to transcentral. A must buy cd!!!!
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on December 4, 2013
One of my top three albums of all time. It's a go-to album for almost any mood, I always have it in the changer in my car.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 7, 2012
One of the best, most popular "hard house", "techno rock" bands EEEEVERRRRRR! If you have never heard this then get this NOW! "3 a.m. Eternal" is easily recognized even by people who have never heard of the KLF. Often used at sport stadiums, this album is the ultimate techno, house, electronica rock collection! THERE WILL NEVER BE ANOTHER KLF. NOTHING COMES CLOSE.
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on November 12, 2014
Good for nostalgia but I doubt newer techno-heads would love this.
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on December 7, 2014
What can you say, one of the greatest albums of all times, ....
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