White Slaves, African Masters: An Anthology of American Barbary Captivity Narratives 1st Edition

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ISBN-13: 978-0226034041
ISBN-10: 0226034046
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White Slaves, African Masters: An Anthology of American Barbary Captivity Narratives + Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters: White Slavery in the Mediterranean, the Barbary Coast and Italy, 1500-1800 (Early Modern History) + White Cargo: The Forgotten History of Britain's White Slaves in America
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

It has been said that the Indian captivity narrative, in which kidnapped or captured colonials reported the hardships of imprisonment at the hands of native people, is the first truly American literary genre. In White Slaves, African Masters, historian Paul Baepler shows that this genre had a precursor in the so-called Barbary captivity narrative, in which some unlucky European (or, later, American) describes life as a slave of the Algerian and Moroccan pashas, rulers of the Barbary Coast. Such narratives form part of Cervantes's Don Quixote and Defoe's Robinson Crusoe; they also make up a large canon of literary, historical, and autobiographical works that are scarcely known today, even among historians. Yet in their time, these writings were widely circulated. Cotton Mather, the famed New England cleric, used several of them to denounce the Muslims of North Africa, proclaiming from the pulpit that being their prisoner was "the most horrible captivity in the world," and Benjamin Franklin drew on Barbary captivity narratives to decry the slave trade of the Southern United States.

In this one-of-a-kind anthology, Baepler gathers several noteworthy examples from American sources, beginning with Cotton Mather's sermons, continuing through post-Revolutionary War writings, such as Jonathan Cowdery's "American Captives in Tripoli" (whose daring rescue by U.S. marines provided us with the phrase "the shores of Tripoli"), and ending with a bogus narrative by one Eliza Bradley, whose 1820 memoir went into 13 U.S. editions. The narratives, Baepler reminds us, point to the long pattern of mutual misunderstanding that has prevailed between the United States and the Muslim world. Read as history and literature, these narratives also help illuminate a dark corner of the past. --Gregory McNamee

From Library Journal

Baepler (Univ. of Minnesota) has done American literary and cultural historians a service by collecting these long-out-of-print Barbary captivity narratives. These accounts of persons captured by Morocco and the Barbary regencies of Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli inform study of the more familiar American slave and Indian captivity narratives. The nine pieces included here (mostly excerpts) span two centuries, from Cotton Mather's "The Glory of Goodness" to Ion Perdicaris's "In Raissuli's Hands," which led to Teddy Roosevelt's launching of warships to Morocco. Most of the works, though, are from 1790 to 1820, when the genre was enormously popular, probably because of the nation's increasing interest in the question of slavery. Baepler's excellent introduction and full bibliography of primary and secondary sources greatly enhance our knowledge of this fascinating genre. Recommended for all collections in American studies.ALouis J. Parascandola, Long Island Univ., Brooklyn, NY
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 324 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226034046
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226034041
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #965,782 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Lois Vossen on December 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
While reading Baepler's book WHITE SLAVES, AFRICAN MASTERS I kept asking myself, Why didn't I know about this fascinating part of American and world history before? While I found the men's stories to be captivating, I was especially enthralled with the stories of women captives such as Eliza Bradley and Maria Martin. The stories kept me wanting to read more...wanting to know what would happen next. I think some of these captivity narratives would make a great movie or TV mini-series! I'm recommending the book to friends who are history buffs and others who just want a good read.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By The Truth Seeker on December 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent source of information on slavery in North Africa and should be required reading in World History classes both in high school and college.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Y. Chandler on January 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I ordered this book, I wasn't sure what I was getting myself into, but it turned out to have more information than I thought I was getting! thanks! and it arrived in a timely manner!
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16 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jedidiah Carosaari VINE VOICE on April 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
A hard one to rate. The stories vary from well done to poorly crafted. Some are fictional, some truthful, and some fictional but pretend to be truthful. There oldest story is 3 centuries earlier than the most recent- and thus the stories represent a very varied style of writings. But the editor is up front with all of this, and most preemininetly, it is the editor who should be judged in this case.

I do not find him wanting. He has brought together a very unique collection that needs greater public scrutiny. It is intriguing to see all the ways the myth of slavery by whites alone is exploded. While the evils of slavery under whites in America are great indeed, so is all slavery, in all times, and this is shown very clearly in this collection. It is horrible to hear the events in these stories, and to contemplate how much more horrible are the stories of those who never got a chance to speak, for they were in slavery throughout their lives. Of little better joy are those who apostocized to Islam simply to avoid the horrors of slavery, exposing another interreligious myth.

It would be nice to have more detail on how reliable these stories are. Although there is a long introduction in the beginning, it doesn't fully give us the information we need to judge the authenticity of these narratives. For instance, it seems very likely that the story of Adams was at least in part manufactured, as the animals he describes do not exist or else do not act in the manner that he ascribes to them. But the editor only mentions that another author has shown with a great deal of evidence that Adams' story has veracity, and then we never hear what that evidence is. Also, it would be more helpful if Cotton Mathers sermon were updated.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BigMac on January 2, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this hoping to expand my understanding of slavery as it existed in N. Africa in the 16th & 17th centuries. Unfortunately, Baepler's effort fell lamentably short of providing anything approaching a balanced view of the subject. Baepler's book consists of the reproduction of 9 narratives written by purported American captives. His personal 'introduction' to the book, which comprises a whopping 25% of the book, is primarily dedicated to the repudiation of the reliability (except when they occasionally support his personal bias) of the captives' narratives subsequently presented. On p. 32, in an ultimately undermining effort to support his views, Baepler goes so far as to quote Edward Said. Edward Said, being an anti-American Palestinian leftist who, while vocally and repeatedly disdaining American culture, chose to spend his adult life teaching at various American Ivy league colleges and happily cashing their checks. Additionally, Baepler's 'introduction' conveniently ignores the history of the repeated "corsair" incursions made by Barbary Coast pirates/slave traders into southern Europe - incursions made for the purpose of kidnapping the white populace of various non-Muslim countries for the end purpose of enslavement and/or eventual ransoming. The one valid point Baepler's 'introduction' makes is that attempting to form or infer a direct correlation between the nature of Barbary Coast slavery and the Negro enslavement which occurred in N. America during the analogous time period is inappropriate. However, even here, Baepler fails to provide sufficient context by ignoring the fact that the TransAtlantic slave trade, which was in the first instance, the reason that any significant number of African Negroes arrived in N.Read more ›
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