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Who Betrays Elizabeth Bennet?: Further Puzzles in Classic Fiction (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – September 23, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0192838841 ISBN-10: 0192838849

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Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (September 23, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192838849
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192838841
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.8 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #572,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"reches an important lesson; that great writers can get away with lousy plotting" Independent on Sunday 13 June 1999

"an expert in teasing out literary puzzles from great classic fiction. With a light hand and a sense of humour" Daily Mail, 11 June 1999

"hugely entertaining" Sunday Telegraph", 20 June 1999

" such an engaging critic" Independent, 19 June 1999

"teaches an important lesson; that great writers can get away with lousy plotting" Independent on Sunday 13 June 1999

'The essays are, almost without exception, delightful, and will be of enormous pleasure to any keen readers of literature.' - The Sunday Times, 1.8.99

About the Author


John Sutherland is Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College, London.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Giles on April 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the third volume of Sutherland's puzzles in classic fiction series. Along with the new mysteries, Sutherland also revisits some of the puzzles from "Is Heathcliff a Murderer?" and "Can Jane Eyre Be Happy?" to acknowledges corrections and alternate interpretations.

As usual, Sutherland's work is interesting and entertaining. He examines the works of 19th century greats such as Jane Austen, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, and William Thackery, and sheds light onto both mysteries in the texts and the writing process itself. I don't always agree with his interpretations of the texts, but Sutherland's essays are always well-written, humorous, and engaging. He'll make you want to read the classics all over again!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on February 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
Mom always said, don't fret if you scraping the bottom of the barrel, that's where all the best stuff is! However with John Sutherland's series of puzzles in classic fiction, there's no denying that, with the publication of this volume, he had reached a cul-de-sac pretty much: no turning back. the pickings here are slim, and many of the best ones were contributed by avid fans of the series, who would write in with their own ideas. Even the schoolchildren with their riddles concerning Dickens' Christmas Carol do better with the puzzlers. In the first two books, his supply seemed inexhaustible, and every time you turned the page of one of precious Victorian novels you found something newly strange. Were they elm trees or lime trees in MIDDLEMARCH? That sort of thing. Now the elm-lime controversy is about the most breathtaking he can summon up.

Where to turn to next? Well, he was able to leap back in time to polish off the mysteries of Shakespeare (how does a clock toll the hours in JULIUS CAESAR centuries before clouds). And then he came to the present day and modern fiction in the REBECCA book. All the while managing to keep Olivier's divine profile on the cover (except for the JANE EYRE book which had to suffice with Orson Welles). More power to him, he's a great git, but this just isn't his best. The anomalies of Frances Price in MANSFIELD PARK, of Esther's mother-in-law in BLEAK HOUSE, of Jim's family in HUCKLEBERRY FINN, all have been treated often and elsewhere by others. (In fact, Sutherland is almost invariably creepy when he comes to write about American fiction, I wonder why.
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By Alan Giangregorio on October 1, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great items presented,fabulous transaction, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED A++++
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7 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A. Wells on January 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
Wow! I was amazed, especially how Sutherland revised his essays on Wuthering Heights and Mill on the Floss. What marvelous insights? What does Lady Dedlock die of? Why doesn't Laura tell her own story in the Woman in White? Read this marvelous book to find out.
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