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Who Gets Promoted, Who Doesn't, and Why: 10 Things You'd Better Do If You Want to Get Ahead Paperback – May 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press; First edition (May 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580088201
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580088206
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #80,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

* Details proven strategies for career advancement regardless of industry and experience, and exposes the most common but not-so-obvious career mistakes people make.
* Includes case studies and interviews with fast-track careerists and HR managers, showing how corporations make promotion decisions.

About the Author

Career consultant DONALD ASHER is a featured speaker at more than 100 colleges and universities every year, coast to coast. A columnist for MSN Encarta and contributor to the Wall Street Journal's CareerJournal.com and CollegeJournal.com, he divides his time between Nevada and San Francisco.

More About the Author

DONALD ASHER is the author of ten books on the topics of careers and higher education. He is a contributing writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, the Wall Street Journal's CareerJournal.com and CollegeJournal.com, USAirways Magazine, MSN Encarta and MSN homepage, Dow Jones's National Business Employment Weekly and Managing Your Career magazines, and many other publications and career sites. He visits more than one hundred university campuses every year to discuss career management topics from salary negotiations to linking your major to your life goals.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I will be passing this along to others for sure.
discerning_buyer
Very good book - from someone who read a lot in this particular niche I found the advices in here to be very well backed-up by arguments & examples.
kapnobatai
The book is also an easy read and is worth re-reading periodically.
Brent

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

127 of 128 people found the following review helpful By Jaewoo Kim VINE VOICE on July 13, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read 4 books on career advancement (I also reviewed them) and this one provides the best practical and streetsmart insights into the dynamics of corporate promotions.

Promotion usually happens to people with the following characteristics:

1)You must be available. If you are tied up in an important project and pulling you out will jeopardize that project, then you might be bypassed for a promotion. It is important to have a replacement for your skills since promoting a person who have a ready replacement is less risky. In other words, minimize all risks associated with promoting you , such as the cost and risk of replacing your current position, your bad relationships with key organizational people, and personal (alcoholism, lack of self control etc.) problems.

2)You must show (sell) you can do the job at the next level. Do not assume you are have shown the capacity for the next level by being competent at your current position. Learn to talk, to dress, and to possess the skillset (knowledge) required for the next level.

3)Anticipate organizational needs and changes. Do not merely be a passive player amongst the corporate changes. Anticipate organizational needs, develop a knowledge base to provide for the need, and sell yourslf as the answer to the anticipated organizational problems to the influencial senior managers.

3)Develope a network of good relationships. Do not be a jerk. In the modern workplace, it is better to be loved than feared since the knowledge workers have more leverage than ever. Talented people do not need to accept your fear tactics. It is important you are perceived as someone who is good to have a beer with.

4)Be a constant learner. This is even more critical in the knowledge based economy.
Read more ›
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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By KA on May 29, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is no shortage of "get promoted quick" books on the "career" shelves of bookstores these days. Many of them have recommentations that should be fairly obvious to anyone with a pulse, such as "do not wear sandals to work" and so on. I did not have very high expectations when I started this book, but I found "Who Gets Promoted.." to be a refreshing exception. It is a short, but enlightening read with some pretty good advice that draws upon the author's experience in HR. I particularly found the real-life stories sprinkled in the book to be fairly insightful and interesting. Overall, a pretty good book for the new graduate and experienced cubicle-dweller alike. I give it 4 stars only because I found the book somewhat short.
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28 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Bodega Girl on June 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is THE book for people who are "doing their best" job and wondering why they aren't getting promoted. The ten steps Asher spells out may seem intuitive to some, but as a career management coach, I can tell you that so many people don't get it.

I now use this book as a "travel guide" for my clients in their journey to move up or move on in their careers.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LVT06 on April 7, 2014
Format: Paperback
After all of this book's truisms, cliched advice and obligatory "John was a salesman..." vignettes, the reader wonders if the real solution is just to be a genuine hard worker rather than a schemer and a poseur jockeying for promotion. Not a lot of new ideas here. But some hilariously awful advice: "The Salt Rule" story of the dubious legend Jack Welch (p. 27) drives home the ridiculousness of maneuvering to be the perfect candidate. Then there are a slew of simplistic, often-contradictory nuggets the author decrees as absolutes: "Volunteer for everything/Avoid thankless jobs...Make the boss look good/Work for a boss who respects you...Always show up early/Negotiate a schedule that works for you." It's so mind-bending, it's as if the only alternative to sucking up is dropping out of corporate America altogether.

The author does not even try to tackle the frighteningly common phenomenon of hapless, dawdling drones gaining promotions for all the wrong reasons -- possibly using these very techniques -- becoming the dysfunctional bosses we struggle to appease in the first place. There are far better books out there: It's All Politics: Winning in a World Where Hard Work and Talent Aren't Enough or Secrets to Winning at Office Politics: How to Achieve Your Goals and Increase Your Influence at Work.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Roy Ames on November 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a senior engineer, but have not managed people. So maybe that is in my future, or maybe not. I found it helpful to consider promotion from HR and higher level manager's point of view. Hard work, competence and not being a loose canon are all good things. But if you are a technical expert, your current position may be harder to fill than the higher level positions, so you may stay where you are. Also if you are in the middle of something where you are playing a critical role, then you may not available to move up. There are a lot of good stories in the book of people at different points in their career and how things play out, so it is worth reading to consider how those could apply to your situation. Personally I'm not so sure I would want to game the system, such as by speeding up or slowing down a critical project or retaining duties or passing them off to someone else to be available at just the right time when something is about to open up. No doubt that can work. But I already make a very comfortable living and like what I do, and reading about some tricks that it might take to move up actually had somewhat of an opposite effect for me... it made me think that what I have now is actually pretty good. The book is good though because it goes beyond the very obvious points of simply showing up on time, working hard and getting along with people. I thought it was well done.
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