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Who Has What?: All About Girls' Bodies and Boys' Bodies (Let's Talk about You and Me) Hardcover – September 13, 2011


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Frequently Bought Together

Who Has What?: All About Girls' Bodies and Boys' Bodies (Let's Talk about You and Me) + Amazing You!: Getting Smart About Your Private Parts + I Said No! A kid-to-kid guide to keeping your private parts private
Price for all three: $25.04

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Series: Let's Talk about You and Me
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; 1 edition (September 13, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763629316
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763629311
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 9.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,919 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The book serves as a great way to introduce male and female body parts for anyone not used to discussing or naming them.
—School Library Journal (starred review)

Harris' tone is cheerful and confident... Westcott's bright digital illustrations keep the affair as breezy and non-shocking as possible -- just as it should be. Expect the usual outcry, as well as the usual demand.
—Booklist (starred review)

This much-needed title stands out for its comfortably familiar presentation of material adults sometime find difficult to share with young children.
—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

About the Author

Robie H. Harris is the author of the much-acclaimed Family Library series. While working on WHO HAS WHAT? she consulted parents, grandparents, educators, librarians, child development specialists, health professionals, and clergy to make sure that the information and illustrations answer young children's questions about themselves in an appropriate and honest manner. Robie H. Harris lives in Massachusetts.

Nadine Bernard Westcott is the illustrator of more than fifty books, including SUPERMARKET! and UP, DOWN, and AROUND. She lives in Massachusetts.

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Customer Reviews

The art is cute as well.
bookmouse
Received this last night and read it for bedtime with my 5-year-old boy and 8-year-old girl.
Jenny B
It even shows a little dog with the same parts which my daughter loved.
MommyB

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

74 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Gretchen H on May 14, 2013
Format: Hardcover
My three and a half year old daughter really enjoys this book. It's written in a style that's entertaining and easy to understand. I like that the authors have included many types of families in the illustrations, and have tried to combat gender stereotypes by discussing all of the similarities about what boys and girls like (both boys and girls like active play; both boys and girls play with dolls). However, there is one flaw in the book that bothers me as I read it to my little girl. In the descriptions of the external physical attributes of boys and girls, boys' external genitalia is named, while girls' is not. Boys are described as having "a penis, a scrotum, and two openings." Girls, on the other hand, are described as having merely "three openings." And while there are indeed a penis and scrotum visible in the picture accompanying the boy's description, in the girl's, the little girl resembles a Barbie doll with a smooth genital area and three dots representing her openings. The little girl has no clitoris at all, and just a hint of labial folds. I understand that a clitoris may have been a little tougher to draw than a penis, but to completely excise a part of female genitalia in a book about the topic? What is a little girl supposed to think about that part of her anatomy? According to this book, it shouldn't exist and doesn't have a name. But if you have a daughter, you know that she knows it's there. The first time we read this book, my daughter was confused and wondered if she had a penis, because she said she had a "bump like that" and pointed to the picture of the little boy's genitals.

Since my daughter still likes to read this book, and since I do like the rest of it, I choose to just add in the words when I read it to her.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Think Banned Thoughts on October 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
What I loved about the book was that it really emphasized how much boys and girls, men and women are ALIKE. It showed dads and moms feeding babies. Sure, one has to use a bottle, but he can still feed the baby. It showed both parents being, well, parents. It talked about how all kids, boys and girls "like to catch frogs, swing high up in the air, ride scooters, and make lots of noise." It talked about how we all have belly buttons, fingers, toes and nipples. It talked about all the ways we are the same.

Then, it talked about the couple of ways that we are different, and what those differences mean - that some of us are male, and some of us are female. (Though, now that I think about it, the author never used those words... It was always baby, girl, woman and baby, boy, man.)

This is NOT a sex-ed book for kids. Sex is never mentioned, not even when the topic of babies and becoming moms and dads comes up at the end of the book. This book really just answers one question - Who has what? And it does that very well.

This is an excellent primer for young children just starting to ask questions about their bodies (and their friends', parents', and pets' bodies.)
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Robin A. Ravech on January 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I wanted this book for my 1st grader (6 yo) as they start getting curious about their bodies and the opposite sex at this age. I wasn't sure the exact way I should phrase the parts of male/female bodies.

This book was perfect - just enough to give him the information he needs without getting into too much detail.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By KRS on December 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My kid is six and this was exactly the kind of book I was looking for for an age appropriate lesson. The illustrations are adorable and provides a lot to look at in the scenes (lots of families, animals, sandwiches, etc).

Aside from the purpose of the story, there are also features of the book that most wouldn't notice but some will appreciate. It isn't just a sea of waspy white people, the family in the book appears to be mixed race. There are people at the beach of all ages, races, shapes, and sizes. There's a pregnant asian woman, a woman breastfeeding her child, a woman wearing a hijab, a child in a wheelchair, grandparents taking care of a child, two men with some children, one man is bottle feeding a baby (in other words, possibly a family with two daddies). Some families will love this aspect, others will not, but it's something I appreciated for the lessons I plan to give my family. Aside from simply what parts everyone has, it could also springboard into a lesson on how people look act or dress differently and the different ways in which people can be a family.

I'm glad I ordered this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. Dougherty on November 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I got this book from my library. My daughter has had me read it 4 times in 2 days she really likes the information. My daughter is 3.5 and very curious. She had a a baby brother and noticed they are different.

This book explains that boys and girls are mostly the same but the have some differences. They use the proper terms, penis, scrotum, testicles, vagina, uterus. They do have a sentence about baby's babies growing in the uterus and being able to drink best milk but no further information is given about the process of creating a baby or birthing one which is perfect for this age.

I was able to use the information in this book to explain to my daughter what her private areas were and that people should not touch them and she understood what I meant.
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