Who the #$&% Is Jackson Pollock? 2006 PG-13 CC

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(38) IMDb 7.1/10
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In this documentary, veteran filmmaker Harry Moses exposes the controversy in the world of high priced artwork. He paints a vivid picture of how art is bought and sold in America.

Starring:
Teri Horton, Tod M. Volpe
Runtime:
1 hour, 14 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Who the #$&% Is Jackson Pollock?

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Harry Moses
Starring Teri Horton, Tod M. Volpe
Supporting actors Ben Heller, Nick Carone, John Myatt, Peter Paul Biro, Thomas Hoving, Jeffrey Bergen, Joseph D. Beam, Judy Hill, Teri Paquin, Bill Page, Ron Spencer, Allan Stone, Adrienne Wilde
Studio New Line
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

It is an indictment of the "swells" of our society, who live an insulated life untouched by someone unlike themselves.
Anne Grogan
The film stands up well as a documentary, covering a lot of ground to interview witnesses who knew Pollock, as well as forensic, art, and legal experts.
E. Karasik
You get a chance to see what this person has been through in life and you just can't help but relate, wanting nothing for the best for her.
David A. Plouffe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By E. Karasik on June 16, 2007
Format: DVD
This film just tickled me; delightfully done with a light touch, it pits a down-to-earth dumpster-diving trucker named Teri Horton against a pretentious boatload of art world snobs, and she proves (in the words of a famous author) that they don't know their scrotums from Kentucky-fried-chicken. The film stands up well as a documentary, covering a lot of ground to interview witnesses who knew Pollock, as well as forensic, art, and legal experts. Bottom line is that the fingerprint and other physical evidence pointing to the authenticity of the painting is just overwhelming; if this were a murder case, there would be more than ample evidence to send someone to the electric chair. The only thing standing between Ms. Horton and $50,000,000 (the estimated value of the painting if it were deemed authentic) is a bunch of arrogant blowholes who can't utter a single coherent or persuasive sentence in support of their position that the painting is a fake. If I ever had any doubts about the credibility of the art world, this certainly settled the issue once and for all. As for Teri, a phenomenally feisty, if complicated and self-destructive woman, she makes one of the most interesting lead characters I've encountered in fact or fiction.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. Frost on August 10, 2010
Format: DVD
I couldn't help but cheer for Horton as she brushed up against snobby art world academia while viewing this documentary, but it's not very hard to realize that art world jerkfaces don't make her painting an authentic Pollock. Horton begins by saying she just wants to find out if the painting is real or not, but by the end of the film she's shifted to accepting nothing less than $50 million for it. A similar pattern of behavior can be found throughout the film in the attitudes of Horton's forensic expert, Biro, who says something to the tune of, "How can I prove this is a Pollock," rather than, "I'd like to find conclusive evidence either way." The lack of objectivity on Teri's part is understandable, the lack of it from an independent "expert" is not.

This film was made in 2006. I watched it in 2010. With the credits still rolling, I wondered if Teri ever wound up selling her piece, so I hit google for a little follow-up. First stop: wikipedia, where I found that her last offer was $9 million. She turned it down. Then I started uncovering all sorts of troublesome information.
* Biro has been accused of fraud and forging forensic evidence (more than once).
* FineArtRegistry . com launched an independent investigation into the fingerprint evidence, from a bona-fide fingerprint expert with decades of experience in the justice system.
* He went to Pollock's studio and collected the very same samples Biro used. He identified massive problems with Biro's "conclusive" evidence, including heavy doctoring of the fingerprint photo, and a lack of evidence matching the two prints (apparently the 3 match points would never be enough to convict anyone of anything in a criminal court setting).
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jokie X Wilson on June 11, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I am an artist of thirty years and consider myself well-read and aware in regards to artworld issues and painting, my main form of expression. Having grown up with people who became the world's most profound art critics once they got a little alcohol in them and who regularly counseled me that what I was learning in art school was all wrong, I found this DVD quite fun. It was fair to both the experts and the philistines.

I am sure that the experts will seem quite funny to a lot of folks. Yes, it looks weird the way elderly men twist and dance in front of Teri's painting to visually test it for it's possible Pollockness. But, those feelings are ironic in the context of this story. While experts are questioned as to how they know what they know, other experts are touted as being experts, and therefore right. I suppose it is a matter of expert against expert.

This DVD has something for everyone. Beyond its entertainment value, it offers a great lesson in how artworks are authenticated. It also offers an insight into the world of people who decide what we will see in museums, a world that almost none of us has anything to do with. Finally, it's a real kick for those persons who would love to tell off artworld experts once they get a little lit. You get to watch Teri Horton do this with great verve.

Personally, I'm on the side of the artworld experts. But, you can decide for yourself. Whether you laugh more at the experts or Teri, you will get some good chuckles out of this DVD. Watch it! :-)
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bryan Byrd on April 30, 2010
Format: DVD
On the surface of it, 'Who The #$&% Is Jackson Pollock?' is the struggle of 73-year-old Teri Horton, a retired long-haul truck driver, to authenticate her five dollar flea market find as a genuine Jackson Pollock painting. As the film progresses though, the emphasis subtly shifts from recording Teri's authentication efforts to highlighting how the established art world dismissed her claim based solely on her outsider status. From their perspective, she's a kook, one who's wasting their time with a pipe dream of having found a fifty million dollar painting in a thrift store. To her, their refusal even to return her phone calls when she began her quest was tantamount to a declaration of war. So she enlists the help of Peter Paul Biro, a forensic specialist, and Tod Volpe, a former art dealer to Hollywood film stars - who had also served two years in prison for defrauding those same celebrities.

As I watched this film, and as the filmmakers documented the evidence to support Horton's claim, I began to feel amazed at the colossal dunderheads who were refusing to consider seriously the authenticity of Horton's painting. The smug egoism of Thomas Hoving, former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, was especially infuriating, and the sheep-like mentality of the rest of the establishment, who marched in lock-step with Hoving's - and others - verdict that her painting was not genuine, imparted at least some of the frustration that Teri must have felt during her years-long battle. However, after reflection, and some slight internet research, I have fewer convictions now than I had at the film's conclusion.
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