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Comment: Condition: Very good condition., Very good moderatly edgeworn dust jacket. Binding: Hardcover. / Publisher: Everest House / Pub. Date: 1978; c1978 Attributes: xi, 242 p. 24 cm. / Stock#: 2056262 (FBA) * * *This item qualifies for FREE SHIPPING and Amazon Prime programs! * * *
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Who was Jack Ruby? Hardcover – January 1, 1978


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 242 pages
  • Publisher: Everest House (1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896960048
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896960046
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,501,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark Tracy on August 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Seth Kantor relates how he became friends with Jack Ruby when Kantor was a journalist for a local Dallas newspaper. An hour after President Kennedy was shot, Kantor (who was a passenger in the motorcade) arrived at Parkland Hospital where Kennedy was being treated. As he entered the building, he felt a tug on his coat. He turned around to see Jack Ruby who called him by name and shook his hand. Later, Ruby would tell the Warren Commission that he had never been at Parkland Hospital.

Seth Kantor also testified to the Warren Commission, but the commission decided to believe Ruby instead of Kantor. It seems that Kantor's account conflicted with the commission's "carefully constructed" time-line. It was the dismissal of his testimony that lead Kantor to investigate and discover other things about the Kennedy assassination that did not square with the official version. These included Ruby's strong ties to the Mafia, especially elements of the Mafia with gambling interests in Cuba. Kantor's book is a solid piece of journalism showing that the official story of one lone-nut (Oswald) being killed by another lone-nut (Ruby) is nothing more than a comforting myth.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TLR on July 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Dallas reporter Seth Kantor encountered Jack Ruby (whom he knew) at Parkland hospital shortly after JFK's assassination. The Warren Commission chose to believe Ruby, who denied he'd been there. Kantor leans toward the theory that Ruby was encouraged to kill Oswald by some rogue Dallas police who wanted to quickly eliminate what they saw as a communist cop-killer who didn't deserve a trial; they also didn't want to risk their lives trying to transfer him amidst threats of mob action against Oswald. Ruby carried a great deal of money (from the cash laying around his apartment) with him that day to establish an alibi for toting the gun. Kantor recalled that when he went to the basement to watch the transfer, he was thoroughly checked for ID by an officer. The amount of security seemed to depend on which guard one encountered. He feels Ruby was too impulsive, unpredictable and emotional to be trusted in a conspiracy to kill JFK, though. He agrees with David Belin that Oswald was probably trying to get to Mexico after the assassination. He doesn't think Oswald and Ruby knew each other, but both men could have been "manipulated" by others, probably mobsters/CIA/Cuban exiles.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craig J. Carvalho on October 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Don't expect any earth shattering revelations. However, Kantor drives home his point, leaving no one doubting his encounter with Ruby at Parkland Memorial Hospital. He also leads the reader in some other interesting directions. But like most books regarding this matter... that only means more unanswered questions.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Betty Burks on November 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover
After becoming frustrated about the Warren Commission's refusal to acknowledge the truth that this writer saw Jack Ruby at Parkland Hospital shortly after President Kennedy was shot, he set out to find out the real facts about this gangster, police informer, strip club owner, general bad character wherever he happened to be. He delved into the sinister world of Jack Ruby to see why he was allowed to get away with murder. He discovers the activities in the weekend leading up to his shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald and possible reasons for his doing so. One of the doctors who testified and got Ruby off has on his office wall a large phto of Jack Ruby shooting shackled Oswald as the police were getting ready to transport him to the courthouse.

Ruby had access to the underground garage where the accused would be placed in the police vehicle, and was seen and acknowledged by several policemen wh did not ask him for ID, as they knew him well and were used to having him hang around when anything exciting was happening.

Kantor had known Ruby since the days he worked at a Dallas newspaper. At the hospital, he reports in his other book I reviewed about the conspiracy, he called him by name and wrote him a warm, personal note from jail in November, 1962. At the time of the assassination Seth Kantor was one of the White House correspondents who was directly behind the open top car where the president's party waved to spectators in the press bus of the presidential motorcade. He was a pivotal witness to history and was vindicated by a later conclusion by the government. He died in 1996, satisfied that he had informed the American public as to what really happen on November 22 and why.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sunday VINE VOICE on March 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was in a 1960's mood, and came across this book at the library while searching for books on that decade. It's funny, I remembered the name of the person who shot Oswald, but actually forgot for a few minutes Oswald's name! Jack Ruby was born into a Jewish family in Chicago. His parents came from Eastern Europe, and had an arranged marriage. They both appeared to be mentally ill, and all the children eventually ended up in foster homes. Jack Ruby ended up in Texas, running a strip joint. One gets the feeling he was greatly motivated by a hatred of women. He had quite a few little dogs, and referred to one of them as his wife, and the rest as his children. He appeared to be a sad, strange sort of person, who wanted to prove his courage by shooting the man who shot JFK. He said he did it to prove Jews weren't cowards. And he actually thought he'd be out on bail by the end of the day. He was arrested, never was free again, and died of an illness in prison, while awaiting the death penalty to be carried out. Most of this book is on conspiracy theories, which I skipped, having no interest. But it was a brief view of a strange man so many know the name of, but know absolutely nothing about him.
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