Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Who Killed Kennedy? Unknown Binding – January 1, 1964


Amazon Price New from Used from
Unknown Binding, January 1, 1964
"Please retry"
$17.50
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Publisher (1964)
  • ASIN: B001H0JT18
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on February 16, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book should be read by anyone who still believes in the conclusions of the Warren Commission. This long essay was first published in the Paris weekly "L' Express" in 1964. It lacks an index and chapter headings, but applies common sense to the reported stories to refute the "lone gunman" theory. A few hours after JFK's death, a suspect was arrested although there were no witnesses and no confessions! We were told Oswald was a fanatical Communist who hated America. Was this too good to be true? The fact that Oswald was never a member of the Communist party, or the "Fair Play for Cuba" group was omitted from the news reports. Never has such an intricate murder been so swiftly settled, without a confession of eyewitnesses!
Buchanan explains why neither Soviet Russia or Cuba could benefit from JFK's death (pp. 17-21). The first people to claim JFK was murdered by a Communist were just earlier attacking JFK as pro-Communist! Who was pulling their strings? Buchanan states that Oswald could only have been convicted if he was innocent (p.24)! But if he knew how the crime had happened, he would be silenced (p.26). Oswald's assassination by Jack Ruby proclaims that Oswald was not a lone gunman, and powerful forces were threatened by Oswald's existence and talking. Nothing over the last forty years has disproved this.
Buchanan recalls the political circumstances of the assassinations of Lincoln, Garfield, and McKinley. You'll find a description of these crimes, and their history, that is skipped in scholastic history books. The important point is that all were done for political reasons, and not of the assassins were crazy. Anything else is just a cover-up (see 'Time' of 11-29-1963). Page 72 explains why Oswald was not insane: he tried to escape, and plead 'not guilty' when arrested.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Mass Market Paperback
.. Robert Morrow note: Buchanan - fabulous early effort.

Noted JFK researcher John Simkin gives it a full endorsement.

I have recently been investigating the Dorothy Kilgallen case. I was especially interested in finding out details of her contact within the Warren Commission and the private interview she had with Jack Ruby after the assassination. With this is mind I borrowed a book from the university library by a couple of journalists, John Kaplan and Jon Waltz, called The Trial of Jack Ruby. The book was extremely poor and was just an attempt to substantiate the idea that Ruby killed Oswald because he did not want Jackie to experience the pain of a trial.

It was the last chapter in the book that caught my attention. The authors included a brief attack on a book written by an American called Thomas G. Buchanan. It included the following sentence: “Buchanan asserted that the assassination had been the work of Texas oil interests who felt that Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, once elevated to the presidency, would protect their favourable percentage depletion tax treatment more vigorously than the Kennedy administration.” As members will know, this is very much my position. However, I did not know of the existence of this book, let alone have I read it. The other thing that struck me was that Kaplan and Waltz’s book was published in 1965. Buchanan’s book must have been published earlier than that.

I looked through all the bibliographies of the books that I have on the JFK assassination. I have a large collection and was surprised that I could find no reference to the book. The only book that did refer to it was Michael Benson’s “Who’s Who in the JFK Assassination”. His entry for Buchanan is just over two lines.
Read more ›
15 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By TLR on July 28, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Buchanan was an American Communist living in Paris and a former reporter with the Washington Evening Star. He was educated at Yale and George Washington universities, and served four years in the Army in WWII, rising to the rank of captain. His book, first widely published in Europe by Secker & Warburg, was based on press accounts. A revised American edition late in 1964 also discussed the findings of the Warren Commission. Reportedly, Jack Ruby read the book and liked it. Buchanan's theory involved two gunmen, neither one Oswald, with complicity by the police. Texas oil might have been behind the assassination, and Oswald was blamed to discredit communism. He believed that one of the bullets was fired from in front of the car (though from the Triple Underpass, not the Grassy Knoll, which is never mentioned by Buchanan).

Buchanan noted that the two newspapers Oswald held in the backyard photos were ideologically hostile to each other. "The most anti-Communist of Europeans realize the death of Kennedy was more sincerely mourned in Moscow than in any other foreign capital, if only for the fact that leaders of the Soviet Union staked their whole political careers upon the chance of detente with the United States." He noted that no sane domestic Communist would kill the President, and risk bringing on a new era of McCarthyism. "One has but to read the very issue of The Worker Oswald is alleged to have been reading to observe that Kennedy was being treated at that time with a respect not far removed from admiration...the first people to proclaim their indignation that the President was murdered by the Communists were those who, one day earlier, had been attacking Kennedy as a 'pro-Communist' himself, and saying that he was the best friend that the Communists had ever had.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search