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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why wasn't this done sooner. Redux
When I originally wrote this review, Amazon did not have this version available so I placed the review under the Schm (or whatever it is) version so here it is.

The collection contains both the original stereo and mono mixes of the album. This is not a repackage of the 1995 release even though a lot of the extras that appeared there are here but in a different...
Published on June 3, 2009 by E.I.E.I. Owen

versus
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Buy it for the bonus tracks, but don't throw out your old CD
I love this album, it's one of the best albums of the 1960's. BUT, this remaster has many noticable differences from the original album! The biggest offender is that Pete's lead vocal on "I Can't Reach You" is single-tracked here rather than double-tracked like on the original. Also, the vocals on the intro of "Rael" are mixed up too high, drowning out the music...
Published on May 20, 2005 by Pete


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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why wasn't this done sooner. Redux, June 3, 2009
By 
E.I.E.I. Owen (Philadelphia, Pa United States) - See all my reviews
When I originally wrote this review, Amazon did not have this version available so I placed the review under the Schm (or whatever it is) version so here it is.

The collection contains both the original stereo and mono mixes of the album. This is not a repackage of the 1995 release even though a lot of the extras that appeared there are here but in a different mix. The mono mix might be of more interest for fans since it has not been available in the U.S. since 1967. There are subtle nuances in the mix overall, the music and the commercial jingles meld more seamlessly than its stereo counterpoint in such a way that it does feel like your listening to a pirate radio station. On "Our Love Was" the solo guitar break is completely different than the stereo version.

The stereo mix is a re-mastered version of the original Kit Lambert mix from 1967 so any embellishments that John Astley did in 1995 are now gone. In addition "Rael" is also presented with its original mix as well as a re-recorded version on disc one. Apparently, the original tape was thrown in the trash and a nasty edit had to be made in the songs first line. This track was re-stored by John Astley on the "Maximum R&B" box set and on the 1995 re-issue.

Another bonus is more of the PAMS jingles that were intended for the rest of the album in-between the extra tracks. There are also early mixes of other tracks as well as a few hidden ones so this pretty much surpasses the 1995 edition especially if you were not a fan of the work John Astley did in cleaning up the recording.

This has to be one of The Who's best albums pre-Tommy and probably the last when they actually used a lot of those great vocal harmonies. Finally, a great re-issue of a great album. Oh, as a bonus there is a small re-print of the original poster that originally came with the album
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49 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Who Album Ever, January 22, 2000
This review is from: Who Sell Out (Audio CD)
I became a Who fan in early 1967 when I first heard "Happy Jack" and rushed out and bought the album. But nothing on that album prepared me for The Who Sell Out, which came out later that year. The whole premise of the album is that it is presented as if it were a British pirate radio station program complete with fake commercials connecting the songs. In fact, some of the commercials become full-fledged songs, such as the two minute-plus "Odorono."
What makes this recording especially refreshing is that while it seemed as if the entire pop culture was taking itself much too seriously during the Summer of Love, The Who were willing to inject a bit of whimsy into the proceedings. In the process they produced some of their most enduring songs: the acoustic charm of "Mary Anne with the Shaky Hands," the tongue-in-cheek "Tattoo," the lovely "Our Love Was" with its razor sharp electric guitar break coupled with Townsend's beautiful acoustic playing and Entwistle's French horn accents, and then there's the ultimate Who single "I Can See for Miles." [It would be the first and only time The Who would reach the top ten in America!]
Other standout tracks include "Relax," "Sunrise" and "Rael," which was a mini-opera along the lines of "A Quick One While He's Away." Since much of the material was more subdued than earlier songs like "My Generation" or "I'm a Boy" little of this album other than "I Can See for Miles" found its way into the band's live shows. That is not, however, meant to diminish the power of these songs.
Like the other remastered Who albums in this series, there is an abundance of bonus tracks. In addition to several previously unreleased commercials, there's the Entwistle-penned "Someone's Coming" (sung by Roger Daltry!), the instrumental guitar workout "Hall of the Mountain King" (based on Grieg's "Peer Gynt Suite") and an alternate version of "Mary Anne with the Shaky Hands" featuring Al Kooper on organ. Several other bonus tracks first appeared on The Who's Thirty Years of Maximum R&B. I have a minor quarrel with this duplication, but it is nice to hear these bonus tracks in conjunction with the original album. Plus, if you didn't spring for the TYOMR&B box set, these are all truly bonus tracks. ESSENTIAL
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a totally unique masterpiece, March 9, 2000
This review is from: Who Sell Out (Audio CD)
If I were new to this page, I certainly would think that these reviews were from a bunch of biased Who fanatics (and actually, they probably are). But if you're not (a biased Who fanatic), don't let that scare you off. This is a legitimate 5 star album, vastly underrated and relatively overlooked in the Who's ouvre. You don't have to be British, or even grow up in the sixties to appreciate the humor and musical sensibilities here, though it probably would help if you knew something of pirate radio and the Summer of Love. What keeps this album totally fresh, though, is the songs themselves. This was before Townshend weighed himself down with the Tommy and Lifehouse projects, where he was too busy making the Next Big Statement to lower himself to just write great pop songs. And this album is full of them: Armenia City in the Sky, Tatoo (check out the fantastic live version on Leeds!), Sunrise (breathtakingly beautiful), Relax, Odorano (works on multiple levels), Our Love Was, etc. Oh yeah, I Can See For Miles, maybe the BEST Who song, is here as well. Oh, and we wouldn't want to forget Mary-Ann With the Shaky Hands, now would we (nudge, nudge, wink, wink, knowwhotImean?)
I'm certainly not going to say I don't like Tommy. For all its overblown pomposity, it still has some of Townshend's best thematic inventions and guitar playing. But it does sound somewhat forced.
I'm certainly not going to say I don't like Who's Next. Considering it was compiled with the remnants of the aborted Lifehouse project, it has a surprising sonic intensity and cohesiveness, plus it's the best SOUNDING Who album, and gave them their arena rock anthem.
I'm not saying I don't like Live at Leeds. To the poltergiest that was present to magically capture that sound in that hall on that night, I say thank you, thank you, thank you. You'll never hear another live album like it, that is, if you ever hear it. And you really should.
But, all in all, this is the Who at their best in the studio. It's not as sonically impressive as Who's Next, but really, with all its other merits, Who cares?
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44 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Who's Psychedelic Radio Show, February 2, 2004
This review is from: Who Sell Out (Audio CD)
The Who's third album, 1967's "The Who Sell Out," was the band's very first concept album, the theme for the record being a pirate radio station that plays nothing but Who songs, complete with radio jingles & commercials (some genuine, some created by the band) sprinkled inbetween the tunes. It's a brilliant, fabulously inventive, totally *psychedelic* Who album, and one of the band's all-time greats. The festivities kick off with a "Monday Thru Sunday" jingle, and then the band charge in with the far-out gem, "Armenia City In The Sky," penned by guitarist Pete Townshend's chum John Keene, featuring elongated horns, psychedelic guitars, and a studio-tweaked vocal from Roger Daltrey. Pete Townshend's songwriting contributions to "Sell Out" are all gems, too, every single one of them: "Mary Anne With The Shaky Hand," the hilarious "Odorono," the coming-of-age tale "Tattoo," the lovely "Our Love Was," the legendary, explosive rocker "I Can See For Miles" (the Who's only US Top Ten hit), "I Can't Reach You," "Relax," "Sunrise," and the mini-opera "Rael" (with it's instrumental bridge later resurrected as the "Underture" from "Tommy"), while bassist John Entwistle delivers the hilarious jingles for "Heinz Baked Beans" & "Medac," as well as the macbre-ish tune, "Silas Stingy."But this remastered, expanded edition of "Sell Out" doesn't stop there: there's a whopping TEN bonus tracks of extra Who goodies recorded around the same time as the album. From Townshend's songwriting pen, there's the extended finale for "Rael," "Glittering Girl," the outstanding rocker "Melancholia," the slick rock of "Jaguar," an alternate version of "Mary Anne With The Shaky Hand," and the brilliant finale, "Glow Girl," which, like "Rael," was later raided & revised by Townshend for the "Tommy" album ("It's a girl, Mrs. Walker, it's a girl"). Also featured is Entwistle's "Someone's Coming," drummer Keith Moon's charming little ditty, "Girl's Eyes," and the fine popper "Early Morning Cold Taxi" (for which Daltrey received a rare co-writing credit). There's even a fabulous, barnburning, King Crimson-like rock arrangement of Greig's "The Hall Of The Mountain King," plus more jingles. The musical chemistry of Daltrey, Townshend, Entwistle and Moon is nothing short of superb, and the remastered sound is simply incredible."The Who Sell Out" was a natural lead-in for "Tommy," as the album expanded Pete Townshend's interest in writing conceptual music. But it's also a mindblowing Who album all on it's own, one of the group's very best releases. So crank up "The Who Sell Out," and enjoy rocking out with the Who's marvelous psychedelic radio show.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Who Sold Out, June 2, 2009
By 
Philip S. Wolf (SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA. USA) - See all my reviews
Widely considered to be among the best records of the 1960's, and by many thought to be The Who's greatest recording: "The Who Sell Out" once again, has received a major overhaul. This "Deluxe Edition" features 2 full CD's of the classic album in complete stereo and mono versions, and another albums worth of unused songs, commercials, jingles, radio spots and alternate tracks.

The original album was recorded between April and October of 1967. This was a very hectic year for The Who, between live dates, TV appearances, and trips to America, the band somehow found time to record, in studios in London and the USA. It was all rushed together in November, so the album would see a release prior to the Christmas holiday.

The concept behind: "The Who Sell Out" was all about the pirate radio that was broadcasting offshore England in 1967. The entire radio format is reproduced by The Who. Radio spots, commercials, jingles and pop songs of the highest caliber were all the work of Pete, Roger, John & Keith. The power pop, heard on the band's 1966 recording: "A Quick One" builds to enormous explosion with this project. Power pop, comes into full bloom on: "The Who Sell Out." This is the last of the first wave of Who records, as the next project would be very different from this.

Some of The Who's finest music can be found on this record. With: "Tatoo", "I Can See For Miles", "I Can't Reach You" & "Rael" this is finely crafted rock/pop music that doesn't show it's age in 2009. Good pop music is timeless, and The Who understood this, that is the secret to this album's greatness.

With this expanded and remixed edition, sound clarity of this project has improved, but due to the limitations of equipment of it's time,{and Kit Lambert} "Sell Out" may never sound the way we want it to, but it has gotten better. The early demo of: "Relax" fearures some jazz piano and has a 'laid-back' feel to it. "Jaguar" is an all-out eruption of Who fury. "Sodding About" is a jam, much like: "The Ox." "Glittering Girl" is a feast for the ears here, the mix has new found clarity and depth. Even: "Someone's Coming" {a song I never cared for} comes alive here as there is much more prominence to the instruments, now heard.

With four different versions of: "Rael" included here, you will hear music that was buried in the old mixes. An early: "Summertime Blues" will reveal how many years the band would age between 1967 and 1970. A surprise hidden track, is included at the end of disc two, with some things I won't disclose here {it would be like unwrapping a Christmas gift early!}

The last edition of this record was released in 1995. "Melancholia" and "Glow Girl" were a part of that version. The reason, that they are not included here, is because they were recorded after the completion of sessions for: "Sell Out" {they are both from 1968.} The Radio One spot {Boris Mix} is also absent here.

Again, it is fair to say that The Who, do reach a peak on this record, that they will never achieve again. The band sounds so young and spikey here, that it is a little hard to believe that they have to grow up with: "Tommy" and become a different group, a rock group. In 1967, Pete, Roger, John & Keith still sound like teenage punks....well power pop punks!

My only issue with this set is the mono still sounds compressed. This fantastic band cannot be contained in it. Some prefer the mono to the stereo versions, and I don't agree to that. The Who, were way ahead of the equipment that they were forced to record on. You would need 64 separate tracks to let this music breathe the way it needs to.

Sound issues aside, this is about the purist glimse into the music of the sixties, that you are going to find. This is a great record, the extras add to the fun and excitment of sounds that are hardly being contained herein. I am not deducting a full point to due sound problems. The music of: "The Who Sell Out" is an 11 !!!
4.75 Stars !!!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars not just a Sell Out.......!, November 2, 2009
By 
silly narwhal "sillynarwhal" (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
Even though Sell Out is one of my all-time favorite albums, I ignored this release for a year, glancing at the track list and thinking, ahh, no great shakes here...I mean, they added a whole 2nd disc, with TWO mixes of Someone's Coming, and DIDN'T include the treasure Melancholia at all, which was on the previous 1-DISC release? If you've had similar p-shawish reservations......

Let them go. This is a wonderful release. Turns out there are some 9 or 10 items here that weren't on the previous release, and most of these have NEVER been released:
*mono Our Love Was, Is ~ the bad news: my rare, if muddy BBC version with the country-western guitar solo isn't really a BBC performance; the good news: it's the mono mix, now in pristine quality on this release!
*Our Love Was, Is, take 12 ~ a truly alternate version to boot!
*Relax ~ demo (none of the Scoops had this!)..Pete doing his best Keith imitation on drums.
*Sodding About ~ not just another lost commercial as I'd whiningly feared, but a MONSTER unreleased instrumental! Not half as long as the excellent Hall of the Mountain King, but makes up for it in ferocity...a heavier display of Ox-power than any other track on the album. Stacks up nicely to the studio Young Man Blueses of a year later. [added comment: I just found out this was the "Signal 30" instrumental that circulated on bootleg; well, now it's official! Is it me, or was Pete's Tommy outtake "Trying to Get Through" based on this jam?]
*Summertime Blues ~ surprisingly, a different studio version from Odds n Sods/BBC. A bit shorter, but another one from the vaults nevertheless.
*Glittering Girl ~ not just two mixes, but two bonafide different performances (one by Pete, one by Roger, vocally), recorded months apart. The latter is another first-time release!
*I Can See For Miles/early mono mix ~ pre-overdub version, for completists and geeks only, perhaps, but isn't that us? An interesting listen. Though the added dressings sweetened it to perfection, this shows how few of those dressings there actually were.
*Rael remake ~ didn't know what this meant from the cover (a 2009 dub mix?), but it's a whole different take from back in the day!

All this, plus a few more commercials and a pair of highly enjoyable hidden items I'll maintain the silence on....and spiced with outtake cover photos of each of our heroes (I remember the John one from the tribute photo montage in 2002) makes this utterly worth having.
As for dear departed Melancholia, I'm content with the explanation it was recorded in early 68, after the album's release ~ but I'll hang onto the '95 version.

And one should, for another good reason: RAEL. It's all well and good the compilers wanted to use the original masters--and the bonus "early" mono mix late on disc 2 does contain the long-lost 2nd verse, so it's here--but I think it's ridiculous they didn't use the '95 mix for the stereo album on disc 1. That mix finally restored that glaringly spliced verse, achieving the definitive version of this song after 28 years, and now you go back to an inferior version? Did the ghost of Kit Lambert influence this decision? I mean, Pete threw a chair thru the control room window over this at the time.... Not a deal-breaker, though ~ just keep your previous one, if it's the '95 version with bonus tracks.

On the mixes ~ need to listen to the mono mix again, but I agree with the reviewer that Someone's Coming greatly benefits from the mono (who'd have thought?). But Odorono suffers ~ Pete's voice is too low in the mix, and it just doesn't sparkle the way the stereo one does (and the way this song should! listen to the "ripped her glittering gown" line in stereo vs. mono). Nice to have both the "regular" (stereo) and the "shaky" (mono) mixes of the acoustic Mary-Ann with the Shaky Hands in one place. Previously, the 80's cd had the regular and 95's had the shaky (albeit in a new stereo version)--so I can finally ditch the former cd, there's absolutely nothing to recommend it now. Even the Rael purists get their original mix back on the new Deluxe.

The two different electric versions of Mary-Ann are under the same roof now, too. My Way (Easy Goin' Guy) could've been squeezed on, I guess, but that and the other Summertime Blues are already on Odds n Sods.

If all this sounds like geekdom...it is. If you've never heard The Who Sell Out, get the one-disc '95 edition with bonus tracks ~ just one version of each song for your listening pleasure. If/WHEN, however, this album is imprinted on your heart; or, if you're a Who nut, or serious collector, or all of the above ~ YOU'RE GONNA WANT THIS.
Too great a treasure trove to pass on.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps the greatest rock album ever!, June 8, 2006
By 
This review is from: Who Sell Out (Audio CD)
The Who Sell Out is a milestone recording, and has for years been a long standing favorite of mine. I own two different vinyl copies which I have cherished. My decision to buy this on cd was based on a friend's recommendation and the fact that there are "extra songs". I was unprepared for just how many additional songs are included on this release, and most of them are simply jaw-droppingly astounding.

My personal favorite bonus track on Sell Out is The Who's version of "Melancholia", which I had heard previously only as Pete Townshend's demo that he released on the "Scoop" album. The notes for "Scoop" tell that perhaps it was Roger who was unhappy with Melancholia as it wasn't quite "macho" enough. Also the Coca-Cola track just simply rocks. What an amazing band The Who were! This record is epic!

If you are unfamiliar with this record then I seriously advise the stopping of your first several listenings with Rael (I) in order to truly experience the album as it was released and intended to be heard. Only after should you dive into all of these bonus tracks as your reward!

The remastering here is excellent and should be played at excessively loud volumes over and over and over again in order to truly appreciate it .

This is quite simply inspiring and should belong in the collection of every music lover with any interest in '60's music or british pop. The sophistication of craft, the range of genres from song to song, the songwriting and the playing have no equal anywhere. Even if you think you may not like The Who (perhaps you have only heard the classic rock '70's anthems, or maybe you thought Tommy was pretensious and long-winded) then you owe it to yourself to hear them at their absolute creative peak!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why didn't they do this sooner, April 21, 2009
By 
E.I.E.I. Owen (Philadelphia, Pa United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sell Out (Audio CD)
For some reason no stores in my area has the regular 2 CD set of "The Who Sell Out" and Amazon does not have one listed other than the overpriced SHm-CD version listed here. I recently got my copy from another online retailer for $20.00. So this is the one I am reviewing.

The collection contains both the original stereo and mono mixes of the album. This is not a repackage of the 1995 release even though a lot of the extras that appeared there are here but in a different mix. The mono mix might be of more interest for fans since it has not been available in the U.S. since 1967. There are subtle nuances in the mix overall, the music and the commercial jingles meld more seamlessly than its stereo counterpoint in such a way that it does feel like your listening to a pirate radio station. On "Our Love Was" the solo guitar break is completely different than the stereo version.

The stereo mix is a re-mastered version of the original Kit Lambert mix from 1967 so any embellishments that John Astley did in 1995 are now gone. In addition "Rael" is also presented with its original mix as well as a re-recorded version on disc one. Apparently, the original tape was thrown in the trash and a nasty edit had to be made in the songs first line. This track was re-stored by John Astley on the "Maximum R&B" box set and on the 1995 re-issue.

Another bonus is more of the PAMS jingles that were intended for the rest of the album in-between the extra tracks. There are also early mixes of other tracks as well as a few hidden ones so this pretty much surpasses the 1995 edition especially if you were not a fan of the work John Astley did in cleaning up the recording.

Again, if you do find this at your local retailer pick it up. This has to be one of The Who's best album pre-Tommy and probably the last when they actually used a lot of great vocal harmonies. Finally, a great re-issue of a great album. Oh, as a bonus there is a small re-print of the original poster that originally came with the album
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY THIS! (And keep your 1995 version as well!), June 4, 2011
By 
M. McKay (Downey, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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If you are a nut for The Who and this album, you're gonna want BOTH the 2009 deluxe version AND the original 1995 remixed and remastered version. Both are two great ways to listen to this album! Not only are there BIG TIME differences between the mono and stereo mixes of this album, there are big differences between the '95 version and this newer deluxe '09 version. First off, the '95 version was REMIXED by Andy McPherson to clean it up a bit, the '09 version is the ORIGINAL MIX (both stereo and mono) by Kit Lambert from 1967. You'll hear original echo, reverb, and even double tracked vocals that were removed when it was remixed in 1995. One thing that turns out to be a mixed blessing is the original mix of the album's closing track "Rael." Andy McPherson fixed a HIDEOUS edit that occurs after the song's first verse when it was remixed (due to the master tape being damaged when it was accidentally thrown in the trash by the studio's cleaning lady). On the '09 version, the original edit remains intact and is a bewilderment to the listener's ears! It's so bad it's hard to believe it was originally released this way!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Their Best Pre-"Tommy" LP, And A Concept Classic!, October 19, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Sell Out (Audio CD)
The Who sell out on several levels in this album (one of the best concept albums ever!): (1)-They obviously sell out by having the LP sound like a Radio London broadcast, complete with wacky late 1960s AM style commercials & public service announcements. (2)-They sell out in an unexpected way, by not following through on the concept all the way to the end of the album!! (That was due to the fact that The Who were on tour during the making of the LP, and, with the release date looming, just plain ran out of time). But the LP works regardless, and this CD version contains many extra tracks & radio spots not included on the original 1968 analog release. Classic tracks include: "I Can See For Miles", "Odorono", "Our Love Was, Is", "I Can't Reach You", and "Tattoo". My only complaint is that they didn't include the 2 real-life radio spots the Who did back in the late '60s: "Little Billy" (for the American Cancer Society), and "Do You Want Kids, Kids?" (for Planned Parenthood). Both these tracks would have worked wonderfully within the "Sell Out" concept. But still, it's my favorite Who album of all... even above "Who's Next" (a close second). Extremely funny and entertaining, this LP is a must for all Who fans. It lampoons late '60s pop-AM radio, and embraces it at the same time. Don't miss this one.
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Who Sell Out
Who Sell Out by The Who (Audio CD - 1995)
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