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Who Walk in Darkness Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 245 pages
  • Publisher: Herodias; 3rd Reissu edition (September 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1928746128
  • ISBN-13: 978-1928746126
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,152,918 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Chandler Brossard was born in Idaho Falls, Idaho, in 1922 and grew up in Washington, D.C. He was a reporter for the Washington Post, and an editor for the New Yorker. He lived in New York City. Brossard died in 1993.

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephen C. Bird on August 30, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the introduction by Steven Moore, this work is referred to as "America's first existential novel", due to its stripped down, Camus-esque narrative (which according to Susan Sontag [via Sartre] in her essay "On Style", can be described as "impersonal, expository, lucid, flat"). This novel is a film noir--A la James Dean and Natalie Wood and their small circle of friends in their late 20's--Minus any Cinemascope sensationalism. Written by a contemporary of the Beatniks, it depicts the lives of this Greenwich Village group (vaguely-sketched characters who are writers of one type or another) during 1 month in the spring / summer of 1948. They attend a wild party with jazz musicians whose guests are smoking "charge" (the party ends with a rumble); a boxing event at Madison Square Garden; they are treated to dinner at an uptown restaurant by a gangster friend of one of the dames. Grace undergoes a covert abortion--her boyfriend Henry Porter is an arrogant, ambitious writer who "passes for white" (supposedly his character is based upon that of Anatole Broyard, a critic who years after this era relished trashing William S. Burroughs' books in the New York Times). Harry Lees has a pad on Cape Cod, where the group spend a weekend, but he's having an identity crisis. Harry thinks he might be gay--He was too "sissy" to make it into the Army and is subsequently guilt-ridden. The entire novel is conveyed to us by the groups's "voice of reason", Blake Williams. This paperback version is referred to on the cover as "the classic underground novel in its suppressed original version". Not to diminish its merits--But there would be nothing polemical about it now. The book ends abruptly in a way that contrasts with all of the preceding flatness--The author left me wanting more.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was published in 52 and only one person on Amazon has reviewed it?!! How can that be possible?

I just spent the entire day reading this book and I wasn't bored for one second. It was my first time reading Brossard, but it will not be my last. Luckily, I already have Double View on my shelf waiting.

This is a novel about people who stroll around together in NYC bouncing between uptown and downtown. The main character doesn't reveal a great deal about himself and neither do too many of the others, actually. But if you've ever spend a day wandering aimlessly, with no exact goal on your mind, this may be something you can get behind.

These people mainly like very basic things: getting drinks/beers, grabbing dinner, dancing, hitting up parties, seeing movies or even boxing matches. They are always getting something to drink and eat. They're more about drinking than Cap, who wants to get on all the time. I found it highly amusing that they never buy groceries, and are always running to some deli across the street for food stuff

The women play a more prevalent role than in some beat novels, and have a chance to speak their minds more often. And the end is a refreshing surprise, because the author lets you in. You become allowed to go below the surface, even if you wished you hadn't, as is usually the case.

If you read this, you also must read GO and Flee the Angry Strangers. Both of those novels were entertaining as hell (and published in the same year) but something about this one in particular hit me in the heart. I'll be reading some more of Brossard.
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