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Who Would Jesus Kill?: War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition Paperback – September 15, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Anselm Academic (September 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884899845
  • ISBN-13: 978-0884899846
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #106,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. W. Linder on August 19, 2010
Format: Paperback
Allman's book is a good primer on ethical thinking about war in the Christian tradition. It's designed as a textbook, with discussion questions at the end of each chapter to prompt further investigation.

Allman constructs a continuum of positions on war, the extremes being pacifism on one side and holy war on the other. Just War Theory occupies the intermediate area. Holy war is rightly rejected as an option within Christianity, so the treatment here is mostly of a historical overview. There are variations within both pacifism and the just war tradition that Allman teases out.

Allman is clearly sympathetic with pacifism while at the same time acknowledging that the just war tradition has substantial merit. He considers 20th c. developments carefully, developing what he refers to as "Contemporary Just War Theory," which orders some of its criteria differently than might have been the case with its Augustinian orgins.

The book is well-written, engaging, and challenging. It's helpful to know something about historical theology along with recent writers like John Howard Yoder and Stanley Hauerwas, but I think any interested person will likely be able to track the discussion well. And in the current world climate, the questions it raises about Christian responses to matters of national security are immediately significant.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jason E. Moore on August 18, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Allman's text, assigned to use in my Christian Ethics course, contains strong accounts of war, interesting insight into ancient - middle age - and present wars, and cites great resources e.g., Madden's History of the Crusades. However, one is continually having to turn back a few pages (unless your memory is stronger than mine) to recall the meanings of the multiple acronyms Allman uses constantly throughout the text e.g., JPP (Just Peacemaking Perspective)WLTD's (Weapons of Long Term Destruction) along with the better known acronyms of JWT (Just War Theory) and WMDs (most already know that one). '
Being a veteran of OIF II (2004-05) and now a religious studies major seeking the chaplaincy, I was really looking forward to this work with the interesting title. Unfortunately, the title is probably the most interesting part of the book! Though the book is full of notes, the text does not read smooth, and it constantly repeats itself, often losing the reader. I give it 3 stars for the historical information and arguments of Aquinas and the section on Holy War; the book as a whole, however, I'm not certain if I recommend.
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3 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Chris McCaslin on December 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The concepts written about by this author are difficult to follow and are slanted towards his own view. Difficult to get into the reading and even harder to follow thought processes.
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