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Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand: 200 Delicious, Healthful, Simple Recipes Paperback – January 2, 2004


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Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand: 200 Delicious, Healthful, Simple Recipes + The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook: A Master Baker's 300 Favorite Recipes for Perfect-Every-Time Bread-From Every Kind of Machine
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1 edition (January 2, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076453825X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764538254
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #484,613 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

whole grain Breads by machine or hand The popularity of bread machines alone speaks to the growing interest in homemade breadmaking, a pleasure that for a time appeared to have fallen by the wayside. The convenience of a bread machine and food processor is certainly desirable with today's busy lifestyles, particularly as it also affords the pleasant homey smells of baking bread to permeate the kitchen. However, many also still enjoy the artistry of a hand-shaped loaf, as well as the satisfaction that comes from kneading the dough by hand, the almost miraculous creation of a delicious food product from the mere combination of flour, liquid, and yeast. And even more are those who can truly enjoy both methods, with the machine ready when pressed for time, and a desire for the more traditional method on a lazy afternoon. Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand will take all readers, regardless of what equipment they have, step-by-step through everything they will need to know in order to make their own delicious whole grain breads by hand, electric mixer, food processor, or bread machine. The subtleties of each method are explained in every recipe, ensuring perfect results every time. From sourdoughs to coffee breads to your standard sandwich-building fare, here is everything the expert and novice baker needs to enjoy the pleasures of fresh homemade bread. Everyone knows that whole grains make great health sense, and now anyone can use them to create flavors to enjoy again and again. The book is organized by type of bread, with recipes ranging from Whole Wheat Raisin Nut Bread, to Caraway-Onion Rye Bread, to Finnish Cardamom Coffee Braid. All feature information on the origin of the recipe, its historic uses, as well as serving tips. This book speaks to bakers of all skill levels, from the seasoned baker looking for new ideas to the beginner who needs to know what to do at each step of the breadmaking process. Special recipes offer ideas on how to serve the finished breads, as well as what to do with yesterday's stale bread. Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand is truly the last book on the subject that anyone will ever need. Visit us online at www.mgr.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Beatrice Ojakangas began her writing career as a food editor for Sunset Magazine. Since then she has written numerous articles for national magazines including Bon Appetit, Gourmet, Woman’s Day, Family Circle, Redbook, Cooking Light, Country Living, Southern Living, Eating Well, Ladies’ Home Journal, and Cooking Pleasures. She has been a regular columnist for the Minneapolis Star Tribune and the Duluth News Tribune.

 


More About the Author

Beatrice Ojakangas is the author of more than a dozen cookbooks, including The Great Scandinavian Baking Book (1999) and Scandinavian Feasts (2001), both published by the University of Minnesota Press. Her articles have been published in Bon Appétit, Gourmet, Cooking Light, Cuisine, and Redbook, and she has appeared on television's Baking with Julia Child and Martha Stewart's Living. She lives in Duluth, Minnesota.

Customer Reviews

When your just starting it makes sense to read a little.
Leaky Bucket
Bless Beatrice Ojakangas for giving us such a good bread book.
C. Roll
There is only one 100% whole grain bread recipe in this book.
Ian Pirsch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

159 of 162 people found the following review helpful By King Lemuel on April 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
Some of the reasons I bought this book:

First, each recipe has mixing directions for using a stand mixer, a food processor, a bread machine, or by hand. Since I have each of these and have even mixed bread the old fashioned way with my hands, I like having all these options available.

Second, the recipes are more down to earth than many of the exotic bread machine cookbooks. They are more healthy and wholesome. The recipes utilize whole grains, but are not necessarily 100% whole grain. They utilize regular bread flour plus many different types of grain that the average joe would not normally associate with bread.

Some reviews have been critical that the recipes are not 100% whole grain. There are some 100% whole wheat recipes but not every recipe in the book is 100% whole grain. The problem here is using 100% whole wheat with another non-gluten 100% whole grain such as rye or spelt that has little or no gluten and getting the bread to rise properly. Many of the flours used in this book by themselves would not have enough gluten to make a decent loaf of bread and 100% whole wheat vs. bread flour also is challenged to make a decent loaf that rises and is not overly dense. Some of these exotic grains will only work if you use them to make quick, non yeast breads.

So, the 100% whole grain charge is only partly correct. For example, who would try to make a 100% whole rye flour bread? You can incorporate whole grains along with bread flour and still eat very healthy and have a much better tasting loaf

That being said, she does have an entire chapter devoted to non-wheat breads such as "Buckwheat & Spelt" bread.
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207 of 215 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
First of all, this is a lovely book with wonderful information.
But the title "Whole Grain Breads..." implied to me that the recipes would incorporate only "whole grains" to the exclusion of white flours. Nearly every recipe I looked at had a large proportion of white flour.
Oh well, Borders willingly accepted my return...I'm off to search again!
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72 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Lynne on November 18, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Way to go Beatrice! This is a very good and practical book. I own about a dozen other bread cookbooks, but this seems to be the one that I turn to most. All of the recipes I've tried have been a success. There is a wide variety of excellent recipes in the book, ranging from basic & everyday to impressive for entertaining. I feel that this book has something to offer everyone, since it has simple enough recipes for the beginner, but would not bore the more advanced baker who likes sourdoughs and more artistic types of breads. Another thing I like about this book is its layout and organization. I have found that some of my other bread books tend to be a bit confusing with their directions. Not this book - the instructions are VERY, VERY CLEAR. I believe that anyone who wants to make their own homemade bread should have a copy of this book. Get one TODAY before it goes out of print - or you'll regret it!
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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Ian Pirsch on October 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
There is only one 100% whole grain bread recipe in this book. Most of them are less than 50% whole grain. If you want healthy bread recipes try "Breadtime" by Cheney or "The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book" by Robertson. Every recipe in both of those books is 100% whole grain. I doubt that most people considering a book titled "Whole Grain Breads..." are looking for recipes that contain just a small portion of whole grain ingredients. With that being said I thought the book had some good recipes and was well written. Therefore, I am willing to give it 2 stars as opposed to none.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful By B. Zanzig on January 2, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have the hardcover edition of this book, and I've only tried the recipes in a bread machine. I wanted to like this book. That said, every recipe I've tried has needed significantly (up to 25%) more liquid. It's not necessarily a reason to avoid the book, but these are not set-it-and-forget-it recipes.

I wish she had given flour weights instead of just volumes. As we know, volume measurements can give significantly different ratios of dry to wet ingredients. (I admit I haven't gone back to see how she measures flour.) Of course they can be adjusted, but you have to remember to weigh the ingredients and adjust the recipes whenever you try a new one. She also measures the capacity of a machine in cups where most authors measure it in pounds of bread.

It's cool that she gives hand, mixer, food processor and bread machine variants for almost every recipe. I wonder if the developers tested every variant or made note of every adjustment made while kneading.

She could have saved many, many pages by giving the directions for each method once at the beginning, and noting changes from the basics with each recipe -- most of the directions are identical, at least for bread machines. Three paragraphs could be one line, over and over and over again.

As someone else said, most of the recipes in this book are mostly white flour. In a US "whole grain" bread book I expected most recipes to be at least 50% whole grain, but the latest one I've tried (tonight) is 1/3 cup whole wheat flour to 2 1/3 cup white flour -- whole wheat flour is 13% of the total.
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