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A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future Paperback – March 7, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Trade; Rep Upd edition (March 7, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594481717
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594481710
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (538 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Just as information workers surpassed physical laborers in economic importance, Pink claims, the workplace terrain is changing yet again, and power will inevitably shift to people who possess strong right brain qualities. His advocacy of "R-directed thinking" begins with a bit of neuroscience tourism to a brain lab that will be extremely familiar to those who read Steven Johnson's Mind Wide Open last year, but while Johnson was fascinated by the brain's internal processes, Pink is more concerned with how certain skill sets can be harnessed effectively in the dawning "Conceptual Age." The second half of the book details the six "senses" Pink identifies as crucial to success in the new economy-design, story, symphony, empathy, play and meaning-while "portfolio" sections offer practical (and sometimes whimsical) advice on how to cultivate these skills within oneself. Thought-provoking moments abound-from the results of an intensive drawing workshop to the claim that "bad design" created the chaos of the 2000 presidential election-but the basic premise may still strike some as unproven. Furthermore, the warning that people who don't nurture their right brains "may miss out, or worse, suffer" in the economy of tomorrow comes off as alarmist. But since Pink's last big idea (Free Agent Nation) has become a cornerstone of employee-management relations, expect just as much buzz around his latest theory.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

"Abundance, Asia, and automation." Try saying that phrase five times quickly, because if you don't take these words into serious consideration, there is a good chance that sooner or later your career will suffer because of one of those forces. Pink, best-selling author of Free Agent Nation (2001) and also former chief speechwriter for former vice-president Al Gore, has crafted a profound read packed with an abundance of references to books, seminars, Web sites, and such to guide your adjustment to expanding your right brain if you plan to survive and prosper in the Western world. According to Pink, the keys to success are in developing and cultivating six senses: design, story, symphony, empathy, play, and meaning. Pink compares this upcoming "Conceptual Age" to past periods of intense change, such as the Industrial Revolution and the Renaissance, as a way of emphasizing its importance. Ed Dwyer
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the author of five provocative books about the changing world of work -- including the long-running New York Times bestsellers, A Whole New Mind and Drive. His books have been translated into 34 languages and have sold more than 2 million copies worldwide.

Pink's latest book, To Sell is Human, is a #1 New York Times business bestseller, a #1 Wall Street Journal Business bestseller, and a #1 Washington Post nonfiction bestseller.

In 2013, Thinkers 50 named him one of the top 15 business thinkers in the world. He serves on the board of directors and advisory boards of several non-profits and startup companies.

A graduate of Northwestern University and Yale Law School, Pink lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and their three children.

Customer Reviews

I found this book informative and easy to read.
Danita Bye
Daniel H. Pink's book "A Whole New Mind" discusses how design, story, symphony, empathy, play, and meaning can change how we view and function in the world.
Yuri J. Bong
A whole New Mind is the kind of book that changes the way you are thinking the world.
Lentoris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

358 of 377 people found the following review helpful By sfarmer76 on November 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
A Whole New Mind $16.47 US, is a 2005 release from Daniel H. Pink that covers creative thinking and other aspects of success. Ostensibly geared toward career pros, this non-fiction title analyzes transitions in society as America migrates from an Information Age to a Conceptual Age economy. The text in Dan's book is not academic -- instead it is more biographical, intuitive, observational, and playful. His book is a real triple threat of content, style, and visual presentation.

Word to the wise -- you are in for a slightly different book here -- right of the bat, the author walks us through the procedure of having his brain scanned as part of a project conducted at the National Institute of Mental Health in Washington D.C. This unorthodox introduction (with four photo illustrations) is welcomed by the reader, as it gives the chapter an introspective quality. Pink shares this experience to illustrate normal brain function -- to note a few misconceptions about the way the brain divides work -- and then posits that while most people integrate both left and right brain activity, R-Directed Thinking will increasingly be relied upon in the future, by people that want to succeed in business or life.

Here is the crux of what Pink is trying to relay. America is currently organized around a cadre of accountants, doctors, engineers, executives and lawyers. These "knowledge workers" excel at the ability to acquire and marry facts to data, and these abilities are typically accrued through a series of standardized tests such as the PSAT, SAT, GMAT, LSAT and MCAT. (As an aside, Bush's test-happy Department of Education only serves to increase the number of L-Directed Thinkers, providing corporations cheap labor in abundance.
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813 of 913 people found the following review helpful By John H. Hwung on April 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The title of the book is very appropriate. For the age that we are in, we need a whole new mind. However, the book promised a mansion, but ended up giving us an apartment. It begins like a Porsche, but ended like a VW Beetle. The author correctly diagnosed the disease of Abundance, Asia, and Automation, but prescribed the wrong medicine of six right-brain-directed (R-Directed) aptitudes.

To the author's credit, he is the first that succinctly diagnosed the major problems the Western countries are facing: Abundance, Asia, and Automation. Most people, including intellectuals and high government officials are in the coma state of not sensing the lethal effects of offshore outsourcing of high-tech jobs and R&D to the fundamental wellbeing of U.S. and other Western countries, nor the consequence of automating white collar jobs by the ever more powerful computer hardware and software. This is the first book that I know of that sounded the alarm to the great masses of the coming sea change. For this, the author ought to be congratulated.

The author has a vision that we are moving from Information Age to Conceptual Age. He said that if we have a whole new mind, we can have an economy and society that are built on the inventive, empathic and big-picture capabilities. He stresses that the main characters now are the creator and the empathizer. He argues that we need to move from high tech to high concept and high touch. These are all great ideas. However, the strategies that the author prescribed through the six R-Directed aptitudes, which consist most of the book, while adequate to battle Abundance and Automation, is hardly sufficient to overcome Asia.
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61 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Todd Ebert on August 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
I came across this book at the local dollar bookstore, where
for one buck, it seems hard to ever go wrong.

The premise of the book is that, to survive in the "conceptual age",
"left-brain" thinking/analysis is not sufficient, and that the most successful
people will be those who better use their right hemispheres. The author cites three
reasons for this shift to the right brain: automation and Asia (left brain rule-based tasks
are now being performed by both computers and cheaper white-collar Asian workers), and
abundance (there is more need than ever for inventors and designers).

Although there are some partial truths to his observations, in general I find this outlook a bit shallow
and myopic in perspective.

For one, the author seems to believe that this pipeline of cheap foreign labor will last forever. But we have to
remember that the US exports both knowledge and culture in enormous quantities (for example, the majority
of students who enroll in my computer-science graduate courses are from other countries;
especially China and India), and
these exports spurn more industry abroad which will have the effect of improving the quality of life abroad;
and hence driving up labor costs in those countries.

Secondly, ALL human intelligence is subject to automation, or at least an attempt to automate.
For example, playing chess requires a combination of mathematical-logical, spatial, and what the author refers to as "symphonic" intelligence. Many chess players think of themselves as artists. And many artists are inspired by
the game of chess.
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