Start reading Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.
OR
with Kindle Unlimited

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God: How to give love, create beauty and find peace [Kindle Edition]

Frank Schaeffer
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (245 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $12.99
Kindle Price: $3.99
You Save: $9.00 (69%)
 
Kindle Unlimited Read this title for free and get unlimited access to over 700,000 titles. Learn More

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle Edition for FREE. Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $3.99  
Paperback $10.15  
Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Book Description

WHY I AM AN ATHEIST WHO BELIEVES IN GOD
How to Create Beauty, Give Love and Find Peace
By
Frank Schaeffer



***

Caught between the beauty of his grandchildren and grief over a friend’s death, Frank Schaeffer finds himself simultaneously believing and not believing in God—an atheist who prays. Schaeffer wrestles with faith and disbelief, sharing his innermost thoughts with a lyricism that only great writers of literary nonfiction achieve. Schaeffer writes as an imperfect son, husband and grandfather whose love for his family, art and life trumps the ugly theologies of an angry God and the atheist vision of a cold, meaningless universe. Schaeffer writes that only when we abandon our hunt for certainty do we become free to create beauty, give love and find peace.



***


“As someone who has made redemption his work, Frank has, in fact, shown amazing grace.” — Jane Smiley, Washington Post


***

“To millions of evangelical Christians, the Schaeffer name is royal, and Frank is the reluctant, wayward, traitorous prince. His crime is not financial profligacy, like some pastors’ sons, but turning his back on Christian conservatives.” — New York Times


***

“Frank Schaeffer’s gifts as a writer are sensual and loving. He’s also laugh-out-loud funny!” — Andre Dubus III, author of House of Sand and Fog



Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

"All we have is our stories," writes novelist Schaeffer (Crazy for God, 2008, etc.) in this entertaining,energetic new memoir. He follows through on this point by filling his book with story after story, all told with the clarity and catchy pacing of a born raconteur.... An intriguing, readable memoir aimed squarely at the post-faith modern era." (KIRKUS Review)

Review

“Part of the impact here, admittedly, is a result of who Frank Schaeffer is and of the platform from which he writes. That cannot obscure the fact, however—indeed, must not be allowed to obscure the fact—that in places this theological meditation cum memoir is arrestingly beautiful in and of itself, that it is, in fact, absolutely redolent of all the power that beautiful suggests. Schaeffer’s openness about his own wrestling with the concepts of God and god-ness which he inherited from his parents is heartrending at times, but it is also deadly honest and always unshielded. It is also balanced in a most gentle way by Schaeffer’s quiet defense of the traditional and his appreciation for its place in well-lived life. In fact, one leaves the final pages of WHY I AM AN ATHEIST WHO BELIEVES IN GOD aware yet once again that sometimes and in some circumstances, an artist is still the best theologian.” — Phyllis Tickle author of The Age of the Spirit

“Frank Schaeffer always writes well, but Why I Am an Atheist Who Believes In God is extraordinary. Somewhere between the sterile, absolute, and empty formulae of reductionist, totalitarian science and the earnest, hostile, excessively certain make-believe of religious fundamentalism, there is a beautiful place. There is room in this place for honesty. For tenderness. For fury. For wonder. For hope. For mistakes. For paradox. For grace. This book is written from that in-between place. It will help you get there too, if you're interested in finding it.” — Brian D. McLaren author/speaker/activist

“A delight and charmer of a read---deft insights, burnished gold probes, arrow hit bull’s eye well again and again.” — Ron Dart (Thomas Merton Society of Canada)

Product Details

  • File Size: 486 KB
  • Print Length: 164 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 149595501X
  • Publisher: Frank Schaeffer; 1 edition (May 15, 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00KDOMMUO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,296 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?.


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
64 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love it! May 17, 2014
Format:Paperback
I met Frank Schaeffer briefly last summer at a festival I was attending. I didn’t know very much about him at the time, other than he was the son of Francis and Edith Schaeffer. I have since read a few blog posts and heard friends talk about him. I had not read any of Frank’s books until this one. “Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God” is beautifully written. Frank articulates the struggle between faith, doubt, and belief very well. I found myself drawn into his stories and thinking along the same lines throughout much of this book. I was encouraged by the story Frank shares of Holly and the eulogy her son, Noah, gave. “My mother’s creed was ‘create beauty, give love, find peace.’” And I agree with Frank that “That’s the best description of the point of living I’ve heard.” What I took away from reading “Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God” is that what we think, know, or believe is of little importance in the art of creating beauty, giving love, and finding peace. In the end, what is important is who we are becoming.
I highly recommend reading this book.
*This is my first review of a book. I'm crossing that off my bucket list!
Was this review helpful to you?
38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Refreshing and Authentic Work of Faith May 12, 2014
Format:Paperback
As a chaplain, in a hospital, I work with people from all walks of life. And what I've learned to do is to "leave space" for the stories that I hear. I try to listen without judgement. But I know that my experience is different from most people. Many people seem to have room for only one way of understanding because they are so busy that they do not want to take the mental energy for "leaving space" because that means taking time to really listen to the story of the other and then taking time to sit with the difficult questions posed by listening. Frank's book has been a refreshing read for me as he states a lot of what I think on a given day. He seems to have lived with the weird, wrestled with it and now has come to a place of allowing space for it all. He seems OK with recognizing that he does not have all of the answers. "You will always embody contradiction he says," and to that I say "Yes!" And maybe what is most endearing to me about the book is the insights that Frank has received from his own grandchildren, "Lucy and Jack just accept that life is weird, wonderful and defined by imagination." He listens to them and allows their stories to help him make sense of this very weird world in which we live. I appreciate Frank's authentic voice and his courage for putting words to paper. I hope to use this book as a book study with others……..a springboard for talking about what is and what might be.
Was this review helpful to you?
34 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable and Thoughtful Read May 9, 2014
By w brown
Format:Paperback
I was fortunate to receive a digital review copy of this book and was engrossed from the first paragraph. Mr. Schaeffer has an engaging writing style. It seemed the book was like one of his paintings, with the subject his life journey so far and his words the paint. He writes as if having a real conversation with a good friend.

Mr. Schaeffer is Eastern Orthodox and writes from a “progressive” Christian outlook. It seems this faith perspective allows him to openly explore doubts about God, hence the atheist slant. I find this point of view interesting, and his honesty refreshing. Even as he draws from the insight of others, his own thoughts and voice are clearly communicated. I felt as if he was saying, “This is how I am and operate in the world, a product of my particular time and circumstances. You probably will not change my mind, but neither will I try to change yours. Let's talk (and argue!)!”

This was, from start to finish, a very enjoyable read.
Was this review helpful to you?
71 of 87 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't Expect Too Much July 7, 2014
Format:Paperback
Frank Schaeffer is receiving much praise for his book. He touches a nerve felt my many of us. We believe, but we also find streaks of unbelief in our efforts to process reality. We may feel that our faith community is not a safe place to voice those kind of thoughts. Except from some downsides I will mention shortly, this could be the kind of book that would encourage more openness

His paradoxical, if not misleading title, probably will draw many to this work. However, as another reviewer has noted, Schaeffer is no atheist. He seems to have many agnostic moments. He is quite accepting of atheists, saying “more power to them,” but he offers far too many reasons for some kind of faith in some kind of god to be called an unbeliever. There is no danger of Richard Dawkins asking him to take Christopher Hitchens’ place among “The Four Horsemen of the Non-Apocalypse.”

Frank frequently voices his appreciation for Jesus, but his Jesus is one that is disconnected from Jewish history and the first century Jewish context. That leads to a serious problem. For one who expresses support for so many of Jesus' words found in the gospels, he seems to miss the fact that Jesus’ main message was the coming of the Kingdom of God. Consequently Frank’s Jesus puts much emphasis on love and forgiveness, but does not call Frank or us to submit to him as Lord or to put ourselves under the reign or “kingness” of God.

For all his acknowledgments as to how much he does not know, Frank still does not seem to exalt or call for the quality of humility that Jesus said was so essential for the Kingdom life. Jesus spoke with reference of the written words saying, “the Scriptures cannot be broken” (John 10:35).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars How to be a pretender
I was very disappointed. This book is about not believing in anything. The title is misleading and the book is not worth my time.
Published 4 days ago by Dave Licklider
4.0 out of 5 stars Quick, lively and personal
Frank Schaeffer is an enigma who will annoy you if the work of his father holds a special place in your heart. Read more
Published 6 days ago by mlmorgen
1.0 out of 5 stars whose love for his family
With this opening title, it's apparent Mr. Schaeffer simply doesn't understand what an atheist is. He probably also thinks that vegetarians eat meat and virgins get laid... Read more
Published 10 days ago by Andrew S. Baldwin
5.0 out of 5 stars interesting book
Good read with solid thoughts. If you're not brainwashed enough to be able to read this book, you will enjoy it.
Published 18 days ago by Ed Stuteville
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, honest, brilliant insights
Schaeffer "knows" religion, and he shows here that he more or less "knows" science. But he admits he doesn't "know" the ultimate realities, nor does anyone... Read more
Published 19 days ago by Rob A.
2.0 out of 5 stars A Preacher Kid's Devolution: An Escape From Reasoned Faith
A Preacher Kid's Devolution: An Escape From Reasoned Faith

"To the new theology, the usefulness of a symbol is in direct proportion to its obscurity. Read more
Published 20 days ago by Kenneth Carter
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Excellent read!
Published 22 days ago by Barb
5.0 out of 5 stars A book for doubters and thinkers
Love this book. Not that I agree with all he says, but love the way he sees God in so many new ways.
Published 22 days ago by Colleen
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
a book that thinks and says a lot of what i have been thinking lately
Published 22 days ago by Lance M. Carlson
5.0 out of 5 stars well done, Frank!
What a great work! I found it challenging and thought provoking. I grew up on Francis' works like "How Then Should We Live" and I find this book to be every bit as... Read more
Published 23 days ago by Joel Thornton
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

New York Times best selling author of more than a dozen books Frank Schaeffer is a survivor of both polio and an evangelical/fundamentalist childhood, an acclaimed writer who overcame severe dyslexia, a home-schooled and self-taught documentary movie director, a feature film director and producer of four low budget Hollywood features Frank has described as "pretty terrible," and a best selling author of both fiction and nonfiction. Frank is the author of "And God Said, 'Billy!'" and many other books. Frank's three semi-biographical novels about growing up in a fundamentalist mission: "Portofino," "Zermatt" and "Saving Grandma" have a worldwide following and have been translated into nine languages. Jane Smiley writing in the Washington Post (7/10/11) says this of Frank's memoirs "Crazy For God" and "Sex, Mom and God": "[Schaeffer's] memoirs have a way of winning a reader's friendship...Schaeffer is a good memoirist, smart and often laugh-out-loud funny...Frank seems to have been born irreverent, but his memoirs have a serious purpose, and that is to expose the insanity and the corruption of what has become a powerful and frightening force in American politics... Frank has been straightforward and entertaining in his campaign to right the political wrongs he regrets committing in the 1970s and '80s...As someone who has made redemption his work, he has, in fact, shown amazing grace."



Forums

Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Look for Similar Items by Category