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Why Does My Dog Act That Way?: A Complete Guide to Your Dog's Personality Paperback – December 4, 2007


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Frequently Bought Together

Why Does My Dog Act That Way?: A Complete Guide to Your Dog's Personality + How Dogs Think: What the World Looks Like to Them and Why They Act the Way They Do + How To Speak Dog: Mastering the Art of Dog-Human Communication
Price for all three: $42.00

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press; 1 Reprint edition (December 4, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743277074
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743277075
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.7 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #240,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Psychologist and dog expert Coren (Why do Dogs Have Wet Noses?, The Intelligence of Dogs) returns with another insightful, fascinating look at everyone's best friend in this primer on the canine psyche. Drawing on a rich body of research, Coren patiently and systematically explains that dogs come hardwired with reliable personalities, allowing their human companions to interpret and predict their everyday behavior. Armed with that knowledge, Coren gives readers tips on how to create a "superdog," a welcome four-legged family member who socializes well with others and isn't overly emotional. Along the way, Coren debunks a number of myths (among them that dogs are little more than domesticated wolves), offers development tips for the key stages in a dog's life (beginning at birth) and providing owners a complete roadmap for socializing their puppies. Devoted fans will note that some material overlaps Coren's previous work, but this illuminating handbook is still an indispensable reference for dog owners as well as shelters and rescue groups.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Coren's love for dogs shines like a beacon...[a] thoughtful and fascinating exploration of the mind of a dog." -- Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., author of The Other End of the Leash

"The author, a psychologist, cleverly combines scholarship, opinion, and anecdotes...Read...his book[s] with your best friend." -- The Dallas Morning News

More About the Author

Stanley Coren, PhD, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia, is a recognized expert on dog-human interaction who has appeared on Dateline; The Oprah Winfrey Show; Good Morning, America; 20/20; Larry King Live; and many other TV and radio programs. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with a beagle, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel, and a Nova Scotia duck-tolling retriever, as well as his wife and her cat.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Chris Perkins on February 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Interesting in parts, but it didn't live up to the title. I found it to be more of an exploration of how dogs became domesticated over thousands of years, and the ways in which they differ from their wild brethren. There were some good insights, but overall I felt it was too "clinical", for lack of a better word. I much preferred the author's How To Speak Dog.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. H on February 29, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book was a very interesting and informative read. Although it was not what I expected, I was pleasantly pleased with what I did get from the book. The book deals with how and why dogs came to be, over evolution, the great companions they are now. Along with a general guidelines of what personality to expect from a breed. However it does go into detail of how it is genetics more than breed that can play huge impact on a dogs personality. There is also a heartbreaking section about dogs used in illegal fighting, as well as inspiring tales of heroic dogs. I think this book is a good read for the anyone who just loves dogs and wants to understand more about them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Yolanda S. Bean VINE VOICE on November 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
This was a fun and rather fascinating study of dogs. I especially enjoyed the personality quiz that was included in the book. The anecdotes ranged from amusing to heart-breaking. The chapter on heroic dogs especially stood out. I thought it was a good balance between science and entertainment. There was a good deal on the domestication of dogs, which I think is interesting, though Coren did not mention co-evolution, which I found to be rather surprising. Still, I really enjoyed this!
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