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Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? Paperback – September 26, 1975

ISBN-13: 978-0521099981 ISBN-10: 0521099986

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 26, 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521099986
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521099981
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #233,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Student on October 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
As with all of Hacking's books, it is well written and researched. However, it is not nearly as simple to understand as some of his other writings. I have taken courses one course each in logic, philosophy of psychiatry, and linguistics, and have done a good deal of reading on my own. That did NOT suffice. There is much discussion of early modern philosophy. I would not recommend this book unless you have some background in Hobbes, Locke, Descartes, etc., as well as some knowledge of twentieth century contemporary analytic philosophy.

This book is just barely out of the reach of someone who is interested and an avid reader. Something along the lines of a minor in philosophy is needed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By toronto on February 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is an old book, but still one of the best. Hacking writes like a dream about extremely complicated issues. His discussion of Davidson and Tarksi is still streets ahead of some of the more recent book length discussions that get you lost really early. The chapter on Wittgenstein, is, unfortunately, not very good and way out of date. But the rest could still be given to (let's say) 2nd year students working on 20th century analytic philosophy, or the famed elusive informed citizen with a philosophical bent.
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