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Why Don't We Learn from History? Paperback – February 27, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 126 pages
  • Publisher: Sophron (February 27, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0985081139
  • ISBN-13: 978-0985081133
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #223,253 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Steve Brooks on August 15, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book feels a little like a partially complete master work. In the forward B.H. Liddell Hart identifies history as the foundation of personal philosophy. The books seems like the framework of his personal philosophy.

Basic history tells you what happened. Elevated history is a theory of why something happened. The value of history is learning from other people's experience - Hart argues the student of history has a deeper knowledge base to draw from than someone with more personal experience. This broad historical knowledge is important because it leads to creativity and creative thought is more vital than courage or leadership.

Hart's stated purpose was the pursuit of the truth - "To face life with clear eyes - desirous to see the truth - and to come through it with clean hands, behaving with consideration for others, wile achieving such conditions as enable a man to get the best out of life."
Pursing the truth requires training. "He has to learn how to detach his thinking from every desire and interest, from every sympathy and antipathy - like ridding oneself of superfluous tissue."

Hart shares the lessons he learned studying history. Hart advocates a survey of history that is both deep and wide. Another key is to remain skeptical, documents often lie and the illumination of personality can obscure performance. Uncovering truth is difficult, we may fear the truth or we ignore our truth for the sake of promotion. "Faith matters so much in times of crisis. One must have gone deep into history before reaching the conviction that truth matters more."

In the next section, Hart explores the relationship between government and freedom. Hart is skeptical of those in power. Their rise in status is not evidence of their superior abilities.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. T. Gotsick on May 22, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Exceptional and realistic critique of human nature, which is at the heart of why few of our cultural mistakes are novel.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Short (126 pages), erudite and wise. One of twentieth century's greatest historians reflects on the ways human nature dooms us to repeat the same mistakes in the context of war. Should be required reading for anyone who gets to vote.
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By Bob Hubbard on July 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love this book! A must read..
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J Mike Surratt on July 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
I guess it was written in the 50's and reads that way. Long sentences with too much information in them, hard to read. Editors have come a long way. Old British English and spellings. In a positive manner full of facts and good for reference material.
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