Why Girls Are Weird: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$0.81
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This is a very good copy with slight wear and does not include a dust jacket;
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Why Girls Are Weird: A Novel Paperback – Bargain Price, July 1, 2003


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price, July 1, 2003
$3.80 $0.81

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Special Offers and Product Promotions

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Downtown Press; Original edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743469801
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743469807
  • ASIN: B000C4SX9E
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,924,708 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Anna Koval aspires to be a writer but pays the bills by working as a librarian at an Austin high school. Killing time at work, she posts a story about "Slutty Barbies" online and is amazed at the response. Soon she is "creating an entire life on the Internet" and changing from Anna Koval, a "nothing-special-twenty-something to Anna K: Web celebrity." She writes about her shortcomings, her fears, and her love life, and hundreds of readers, including a neurotic groupie and a potential new love, respond in amazingly personal e-mails of their own. When Anna's father dies unexpectedly, she pours out her grief to her invisible fans, and then realizes that she is revealing too much of herself. Feeling overly vulnerable, she gradually deletes her files because, as she explains, "too much of me was up on that webpage, plastered like a billboard." Ribon herself kept a popular Web journal called "Squishy," and she is also a comedian, experiences that shape her light and entertaining first novel. Deborah Donovan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

Pamela Ribon is a bestselling author, television writer and performer.  A pioneer in the blogging world, her first novel, Why Girls Are Weird, was loosely based on her extremely successful website pamie.com.  The site has been nominated for a Bloggie in Lifetime Achievement, which makes her feel old. Ribon created the cult sensation and tabloid tidbit Call Us Crazy:  The Anne Heche Monologues, a satire of fame, fandom and Fresno.  Her two-woman show, Letters Never Sent (created with four-time Emmy winner and Jay Leno Show favorite Liz Feldman) was showcased at the 2005 HBO US Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen.  She has been writing in television for the past seven years, in both cable and network, including on the Emmy-award winning Samantha Who? starring Christina Applegate.  Using her loyal Internet fan base, Ribon sponsors book drives for libraries in need.  Over the years, pamie.com has sent thousands of books and materials to Oakland and San Diego, sponsored a Tsunami-ravaged village of schoolchildren, and helped restock the shelves of a post-Katrina Harrison County, Mississippi.  Ribon’s book drive can now be found at DeweyDonationSystem.org, which has sponsored libraries from the Negril School in Jamaica to the Children’s Institute in Los Angeles. 

More About the Author

Pamela Ribon is a bestselling author, tv writer, screenwriter, retired derby girl, and Wonder Killer. In addition to her novels (one of which landed her a spot in the Oxford English Dictionary under "Muffin Top" (look it up.)), Pamela continues to work in film and television, notably having written for the Emmy award-winning show Samantha Who?. Her stage productions have become international cult sensations (Call Us Crazy: The Anne Heche Monologues), and she's been a featured performer at HBO's US Comedy Arts Festival. On the Internet she's known as "Pamie," where she's been running her wildly successful website pamie.com for a very long time, long enough to have been nominated for a "Lifetime Achievement" Bloggie. Pamela lives in Los Angeles, where she writes and writes and writes.

Photo Credit: Jessica Schilling Photography

Customer Reviews

It's fun and funny, well written and imaginative.
"reb1008"
There will be at least one character that everyone can relate to and say, "Oh my, that's just exactly like someone in my life."
Gracie
An entertaining read, and the chapters are short so it's a good book for people who can only read a few pages in one sitting.
juliannagirl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By juliannagirl on July 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
A few months ago I discovered the author's web site, and on a whim bought the book. The chapter on how six-year-old girls *really* play with Barbies is reason alone to read it. Her writing style is very accessible, making this 300-page book a fast read. The story itself is entertaining, touching, funny, and true; there were so many moments I went, "I do that! I know that! I thought I was the only person who ever <fill in the blank>!" Perhaps that is why people who follow online journals feel like we "know" the people writing them, since they write about everyday stuff and we eagerly identify. The more interesting parts are the protagonist Anna's thoughts on the web journaling phenomenon: why people do it; how much of what's written in online journals is true; just how much of her life should be accesible to her readers; and where to draw the boundaries between a person's on-line and off-line lives. An entertaining read, and the chapters are short so it's a good book for people who can only read a few pages in one sitting. (I have friends with kids and businesses to run, so this factor is important when choosing books.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
....
Those of us who have been following pamie.com for some time have known that Pamela Ribon is a talented writer. She'll make you laugh until your sides ache, and then she'll turn around and break your heart and leave you trying to wipe the tears out of your eyes before the person in the cube across from yours realizes you're crying. So when I heard she had written a book, I couldn't wait to read it.
Once I actually got my hands on the book, I couldn't put it down. I read it in one sitting, and I was again reminded of why she's one of my favorite writers.
This is a terrifically crafted story. While it may appeal to the same demographic as Bridget Jones, don't be fooled into thinking it's another knock off. Reading this book was like hanging out with your best friend and getting to read her journal all at the same time. It's funny, it's touching, and it has a lot of heart.
Girls - this should be required reading. You should buy this book just for the piece on "How to Fake a Football Orgasm" alone (if I'd read that before last year's football season I might have saved a relationship). Guys, if you want to know how to get to us - read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
The good: Pamela Ribon does bring the funny. In several places, this book is laugh-out-loud hilarious.
The bad: if you've read her website (pamie.com), you've already read many of these jokes. There's lots of new stuff...but I found myself skimming over a fair amount of material that I'd read before years earlier. My girlfriend thought the entire book was drop-dead funny from start to finish and I was painfully jealous that I couldn't have the same reaction since many of the bits were old hat to me already.
the good: The author has keen observations about modern dating and the relationships (romantic or platonic) that spawn from the internet. In some ways, it could be read as a cautionary tale about who is online. Through her web-site, the main character (Anna) attracts legions of readers, including an ex of her ex-boyfriend, a moderately disturbed girl who seems obsessed with Anna and another who, infatuated with Anna's description of her old boyfriend, sets out to make him her own.
Some of the funniest and best written parts of the book are the chain of flirting emails between Anna and a boy who lives far way that she's falling in love with. This might be the best romantic comedy dialogue (OK, truthfully it's correspondence, but it packs the emotional intensity of dialogue) that's been seen in years. This is where Why Girls are Weird really shines. The rhythm and dynamic of email relationships as presented here ring true and I don't think anyone has ever captured this in print quite so well.
the bad:
For the first 100 pages or so, I found Anna depressed, slightly mean-spirited and rather unlikeable. The junkies in Trainspotting seem warm and compassionate by comparison to Anna in the first third of this book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
There are some genuinely amusing and touching moments, and it's nice to read a book that incorporates some common language and experiences amongst young women in my generation. At first I sympathized with the character of Anna, who is experiencing something of an identity crisis after a bad breakup and a family tragedy. However, after a while Anna becomes completely unsympathetic as she basically lies and deceives her way through most of the book. The ending was completely unbelievable--straight out of Sex and the City or some other horrible romantic comedy. Insecurity and the need for human love and contact are issues that I think most people can empathize with; the length of deception to which Anna goes, however, was not a quality I could admire at all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
I found the book on the new paperback section and was immediately taken with the cute cover and catchy title. I got home and cracked it open meaning to just sample a few pages before dinner. But at 1am I finished, neck sore, hungry, and the dog unwalked. I'm not a big fan of chick lit. It seems to me that the market has been saturated to the point of brain freeze -- seeing all those similarly-covered books. But Why Girls Are Weird rises far above. Mostly for two reasons that I can figure out.
1 -- The narrative voice of Anna K. is not the whiny simpering heroine of most. Sure she has man trouble and body issues, but hers is the voice of the smart girl. The girl who doesn't necessarily wholeheartedly embrace part and parcle the girlishness being a girl, but still remains firmly feminine. She is what I would want my daughter to be. Thoughtful and introspective, even when girly or man-crazy.
2 -- Ribon is funny. She has funny-chops the likes of which I haven't come across in a while. I discovered her website after reading the book and am very glad to have more of her to read. Ribon should be taking the SNL or Friends writing room by storm and kicking out the hacks, if there is any justice in the world for funny women.
Why Girls Are Weird will make you feel cuddly and empowered at the same time. And that's a rare feat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?