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Why I Love Baseball Audio, Cassette – Unabridged, March 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: New Millennium; Unabridged edition (March 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590073606
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590073605
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,360,282 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

There's more padding in this book than in all the chest guards worn by major league umpires and catchers, but once readers strip that away, they'll find a charming, sweet and savvy paean to the national pastime. Baseball wins most fans during childhood, and King starts with his own, when, at age 17, in 1951, he watched Bobby Thomson hit the home run that won the pennant for the Giants, against King's beloved Brooklyn Dodgers ("the saddest day in my life"). He then backtracks to even younger days, extolling the smell of popcorn, beer and hot dogs, the sight of brown dirt against green grass and the "crisp, white uniforms of the Dodgers." (King is now a Baltimore Orioles fan.) He goes on to cover the sports' eccentricities and eccentrics, the WWII years, old timers' games, Jewish players, baseball songs, stadiums, the joys of the box score, really just about anything that strikes his fancyâ€"including, occasionally, dramatic baseball issues such as its early exclusion of nonwhite players and its current labor troubles ("millionaires arguing with billionaires"; King calls for a payroll floor as well as a tax on high payrolls). A good deal of the baseball lore King relates will be familiar to seasoned fans, and he stuffs the book with others' tales or writings; a full 23 pages are devoted to a reprint of a 1987 Washington Post Magazine article of 99 reasons why baseball is superior to football. Still, what glues it all together and gives it a memorable spin is King's distinctive voiceâ€"the book reads like a fireside chat with this master conversationalistâ€"and, above all, his passion for the sport. Most baseballs fans will adore this love letter to one of America's most enduring institutions.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Larry King, host of the first global call-in television program of its kind, has authored twelve books. In May 2002 he published his first novel, Moon Over Manhattan, (co-authored by Thomas H. Cook) to much acclaim. He has hosted over 40,000 interviews in his forty-year career, and earned the News and Documentary Emmy for Outstanding Interview/Interviewer, the George Foster Peabody Award for Excellence in Broadcasting, ten Cable Ace Awards, and four honorary collegiate degrees. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on August 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
Larry King tells nice recollections from his childhood about the game, and the book did capture my interest, but as I read I notices a plethora of mistakes, inaccuracies, and errors. It seems that a proofreader did not check many of the facts that Larry King recalls. It got to be somewhat comical as I read finding one mistake after the next. It's also very repetitive - and littered with phrases like, "Can you tell I like baseball," "Can you tell I love uniforms," and the like.

As I read this, I had the feeling that Larry just spoke about baseball into a tape recorder and the words were made into a hastily written book.

I expected much better.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Smith on March 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
You don't have to like both Larry King and Baseball to read this book. If you like just one of the two then this is a book you should read. The range of emmotions covered in this novel are, to say the least, sweeping. I highly recommend the audio version read by The King himself. This man has passion, that's all I can say. This is one of those books you cozy up to at the end of a long day. Sit back, relax, and immerse yourself in all things Larry.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bill Emblom on April 23, 2004
Format: Hardcover
It's a well known fact that Larry King has a special place in his heart for the Brooklyn Dodgers, and is now a fan of the Baltimore Orioles. Larry provides us with his sentimental reasons why he loves the game of baseball. I, along with him, share that devotion. Larry quotes former Cardinals' star Enos Slaughter as saying he deliberately spiked Jackie Robinson when running down to first base in Robinson's initial 1947 season. This is interesting since Slaughter has denied he deliberately did it in other books. King also mentions he believes the Jewish Hank Greenberg of the Tigers was deliberately walked during the final month of the season so he wouldn't break Babe Ruth's home run record. Numerous quotes from various players and managers in addition to anecdotes are provided that can be found in several other books. I did find a few mistakes in the book. The first cover of Sports Illustrated showing Eddie Matthews of the Milwaukee Braves batting was taken in County Stadium in Milwaukee, not in St. Louis as King mentions. Also, two of the lines from Terry Cashman's popular 1981 song, "Talkin' Baseball" are incorrect. The line "And Alexander's pitchin' baseballs in Washington" should read "And the Great Alexander is pitchin' again in Washington." The other line given incorrectly is "Seaver, Tommy John, and Vida Blue." It should read, "Seaver, Garvey, Schmidt, and Vida Blue." The final mistake I found involved Tigers' pitcher Bob Cain pitching to the midget Eddie Gaedel in August of 1951. The book reads "Bob Cain got down on his knees to throw the pitch. The catcher sprawled prone to catch the pitch." The photo of this at bat in other books shows Tigers' catcher Bob Swift on his knees to receive Cain's pitches to Gaedel.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By W. C HALL VINE VOICE on May 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As an expression of Larry King's sixty-year love affair with baseball, this would have made an enjoyable magazine article. But as a book...if you strip away the Thomas Boswell article, the slightly misquoted Terry Cashman lyrics, and the other padding, you find what seems to be the result of Larry talking into a tape recorder for a couple of hours, with all the positives and negatives that implies. There's plenty of heartfelt enthusiasm here, but little reflection or depth. And as King should know, memory can be faulty, especially with the passage of time. Take his story about his childhood fight with his friend Herbie Cohen, sparked by their position-by-position debate over which team was superior in 1947--King's Dodgers or Cohen's Yankees. As King tells it, they came to blows over who was superior at second base, where he insisted the Dodger rookie Jackie Robinson had the clear edge. The problem with that? As Cohen himself notes when he's quoted elsewhere in the book, Robinson played first base during his rookie season. (Eddie Stanky still patrolled the hot corner for the Bums; Robinson moved to second the next year, after Stanky was traded to the Boston Braves.) This is an entertaining affirmation of King's true love for the sport, but could have offered the reader a lot more.--William C. Hall
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