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Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain Paperback – December 22, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 22, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583918175
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583918173
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Why Love Matters is hugely important. It should be mandatory reading for all parents, teachers and politicians." - The Guardian

"Sue Gerhardt's choice of title reflects the loving attention to detail that is the essence of this book... excellently researched and well-written book which deserves to be widely read by practitioners, researchers and parents." - Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice

"Sue Gerhardt has written a vitally important book - a must-read for every parent, teacher, physician and politician." - Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence

"I would like to add to that positive view and suggest that this book be on every reading list you offer to new parents, politicians, clients, colleagues, family and friends." - Jeannie Wright, British Journal of  Guidance and Counselling

"Gerhardt's book offers perhaps one of the most concise arguments for why love and affection in early life truly do matter. Written with clear and direct language, this text can serve as a general resource for mental health professionals and parents alike." - Rachel Altamirano, Clinical Social Work Journal


More About the Author

Dr.Sue Gerhardt is a practicing psychotherapist living and working in Oxford, England.
Her first job after leaving Cambridge University was as a paralegal worker in a community law centre in north London, working mainly with disaffected youths in trouble with the law. She later went on to become a film-maker,of films such as Tell It Like It Is, about sexual abuse within the black community.
In the 1990s,she became a psychotherapist and studied early child development with the Tavistock Clinic. Inspired by the work of Daniel Stern, she co-founded a charity, the Oxford Parent Infant Project (OXPIP)in 1997 to provide psychotherapy for parents and babies under 2. The organisation continues to flourish and serves around 500 families a year. She is delighted that there are now many new PIPs springing into existence around the UK.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Very useful, nicely written book.
Julia
As individuals, and as a society, we CAN and MUST take these lessons to heart to provide the best foundation possible for all children and parents.
Mary Lee
I highly recommend this book to new moms and grandmothers.
silady

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 62 people found the following review helpful By R. Hardy HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 27, 2005
Format: Paperback
Everything we do or say or learn is mediated by the wrinkled and gelatinous matter inside our skulls. As children grow up, their brains obviously change; not only do the neurons get charged with all the information the children acquire, but the brains physically change as well. It should be no surprise that children who have physical problems in upbringing, like, say, a bad diet, have brains that don't properly grow. It is also no surprise that children who are brought up in emotionally distressing situations have trouble getting along with others into adulthood. It was a surprise to find out, however, that children who are brought up under stress actually have brains that are physically different, and operate differently, from those who are well cared for. In the ambitiously-titled _Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain_ (Brunner-Routledge), Sue Gerhardt has summarized current findings in neuroscience about the developing brains of infants and how that development is influenced by the infants' early attachment experiences. Her work will be tough in parts for those unfamiliar with the neurological territory, but she presents many appealing examples, illustrations, and case studies, so that anyone might enjoy here learning about the inchoate findings of the links between attachment experiences and brain development.

The idea that experiences change brains physically, beyond the mere instillation of learning, is fully accepted. Gerhardt concentrates on the orbitofrontal cortex and on the effects of cortisol, a stress hormone which is required for development of the cortex and other brain regions, but which causes such development to be thwarted if the levels are too high.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By littlecatland on September 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book really opened my eyes to the fundamentals of brain development in infancy. I had no idea how much the actual physiology of the brain is affected by infant experience, not just the psychological. Sources are well cited, ideas are well backed up in scientific research, and the information is presented in a way which benefits lay readers as well as researchers (with an introduction about brain structure and development).

I suggest every parent-to-be get a hold of this book. One reviewer was dissapointed by the lack of specific exercises to play with. However, I don't think they are necessary because this book gives specifics about why certain strategies affect infants. I think understanding why certain types of parenting work better than others makes parents more likely to come up with the kind of adaptive spontaneous strategies which come out of such a way of thinking. You could also check out Brazelton for more specific info about exercises to do with your baby.

As a side note, once you read this book and make decisions about parenting based on the exhaustive research cited within, you will not only feel more confident about your parenting, but you will be able to defend against attacks from helpful but persistent grandparents, in-laws, and friends - should you want to engage in such discussions.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By DBJ on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
A scientific, psychoanalytic look at brain development differences in babies who are loved, cuddled, touched vs babies whose mothers are cold. The book focuses on the relationship between mother and child and gives us an understanding of "how babies needs cannot be put off". We as adults, need to adjust our schedules to babies needs. Not receiving the stimulation necessary has been shown to affect brain development.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jan Hunt on January 31, 2007
Format: Paperback
Why Love Matters offers an eloquent overview of the latest scientific research on attachment. The author has accomplished the formidable task of linking the concrete language of neurochemistry to the more abstract area of attachment theory. In so doing, she has greatly clarified the nature-nurture argument. Her book beautifully establishes the critical importance of close emotional attachment for optimum brain development in childhood, and one's subsequent capacity for love and trust in adulthood. Why Love Matters is an essential new work in the field of attachment.

Jan Hunt, author of The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. R. Pollock on August 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book offers an overview of baby brain development that makes me want to learn more and to educate others about the crucial nature of responsive infant care. It is a must read for those who work with families in any capacity as well as those with infants at home.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Karolyn Woods on October 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
An excellent source of information for everyone. Would be extremely helpful for mothers-to-be. Helps you understanding your developmental psychology. Gives you more information on you and why you turned out the way you did. Should be required reading for high school students who will be parents of the future. It would give them a better overview on how to interact with their children in a more positive way.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. L. Cook on August 31, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The text is well written and provides readily accessible information related to cognitive development and lifelong impacts. I believe the comparison of nature/nurture and the ensuing debates in this area are well served by this material. Any parent, communication scholar, or educator would be well served by reading this text. The only conflict I had with this book was the title, which may mislead people seeking pop press to believing that this is one of those frothy self-help books. When I finished the book, I could feel and hear the applause for the author!
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