Why Smart People Can Be So Stupid and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $3.88 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Why Smart People Can Be S... has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Clean text inside, minimal cover wear.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Why Smart People Can Be So Stupid Paperback – September 1, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0300101706 ISBN-10: 0300101708

Buy New
Price: $21.12
27 New from $13.80 29 Used from $7.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.12
$13.80 $7.98

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Why Smart People Can Be So Stupid + Knowledge And Decisions
Price for both: $44.52

Buy the selected items together
  • Knowledge And Decisions $23.40

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300101708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300101706
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #130,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book is a serious attempt to understand a common phenomenon. Students of human behaviour should find it appealing and may even learn how to avoid doing stupid things." Psychology Today; "This original book gathers together the best thinking and research on what causes smart people to do foolish things. A highly original work with an exceptional list of contributors." Martin Ford, George Mason University; "Marvellous, devilishly clever, and culturally timely book... A fascinating exploration... All of the contributions are outstanding." Choice

From the Back Cover

"This book is a serious attempt to understand a common phenomenon. Students of human behavior should find it appealing and may even learn how to avoid doing stupid things."-Psychology Today; "This original book gathers together the best thinking and research on what causes smart people to do foolish things. A highly original work with an exceptional list of contributors."-Martin Ford, George Mason University; "Marvelous, devilishly clever, and culturally timely book. . . . A fascinating exploration. . . . All of the contributions are outstanding."-Choice;

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Anthony R. Dickinson on May 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Whether one believes acting stupid to be the antithesis of acting smart or intelligently [most of us?], or perhaps prefers to regard stupid behaviour as foolishness in the face of misplaced wisdom [Sternberg], this volume brings together a rich diversity of approaches and opinion to one of life's persistent questions. Some 15 authors gather here in an attempt to inform the reader what stupidity and smartness consist in, whilst providing a breadth of examples from both the empirical literature (laboratory studies, psychometric survey) and the popular press (typically involving embarrassed politicians). Over the course of some eleven chapters, a number of recurrent themes and proposals address the ways in which stupid behaviour might best be characterised, identified or defined, but of more interest (at least to me) was to also find a number of attempts to explain the behaviours so described. A number of the contributors point (directly or indirectly) to particular instances of `stupidity' which may well have been construed as having demonstrated adaptive, rather than maladaptive behaviour under different circumstances. In this respect, the reader is repeatedly lead to the view that personal trait labels such as smart, intelligent or stupid, should be viewed as context dependant terms, if not entirely context-specific, characterisations of human behaviour. In short, what might be considered stupid behaviour under one circumstance, might well be considered smart behaviour in another. So, why do these authors think that smart people can be so stupid?Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gian Fiero on January 11, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Warning: This book is not for everyone. I'm a college professor and I enjoyed it and will be using it primarily as a reference tool. Because of the pejorative nature of the title, some people may be expecting something a little more reader friendly with a casual tone. That's not the case at all. It's complex and filled with a lot of psychological terminologies.

Written by multiple authors who make key contributions, the book introduces a myriad of compelling reasons as to why smart people can be so stupid in each chapter. But first the definitions. Smart is the psychological concept of intelligence. Stupidity can be the property of an act, behavior, state, or person.

Intelligence seems to be domain specific, meaning that we are smart in one area, and stupid in others; hence the term: smart, but stupid. In general we recognize people as intelligent if they have some combination of these achievements: (1) good grades in school; (2) a high level of education; (3) a responsible complex job, or (4) some other recognition of being intelligent, such as winning prestigious awards or earning a large salary; (5) the ability to read complex text with good comprehension or (6) solve difficulty or novelty problems. Stupid is also defined as failure to use cognitive abilities, the opposite of smart, and mindlessness.

Perhaps the most adopted view of intelligence is defined by the American Psychological Association: the ability to understand complex ideas, to adapt effectively to the environment, learn from experience, to engage in various forms of reasoning, and to overcome obstacles by taking thought.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?