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Why We Eat Our Own Paperback – January 1, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: First Punch Press (2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0985381132
  • ISBN-13: 978-0985381134
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #574,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael Cheshire is the founding and senior pastor of The Journey Community Church in Conifer,Colorado, a tiny town of 9000 in the Rocky Mountains. He and his wife Amy started the church in 2008 with a small group of friends. Within three years of their launch, the church is running over 700 plus each Sunday. His story is interesting in the ways The Journey Church grew. The church has a full-service diner, a race car, driving school and an odd jobs company (just to name a few), all of which are staffed and run with volunteers from their congregation. Michael believes that churches grow when they gain proximity to people. He teaches that any venture that gets church people to interact with the public increases our chances of developing a friendship with them, and friendship with Christ-followers can lead to friendship with Christ himself. Michael is very passionate about getting the church to put on new "looks" to get near a lost and dying world. He is the author of, "How to Knock Over A 7-11 and Other Ministry Training", and his latest release "Why We Eat Our Own". He is a no holds bar kind of guy; funny to the core but his insights cut just as deep.

Customer Reviews

We need more Christians and Church leaders like this.
Nancy M Segovia
The stories are fun to read, the challenges are thought provoking, and the writing style is simple.
Sean O'Kelly
Thanks Mike for all your honesty and love for the broken.
Hector R. Mora Jr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Lori413 on July 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Michael Cheshire offers a raw, uncensored view of a huge nagging problem many churches struggle with today. With a soulful vulnerability, readers are easily drawn in to this page-turner. But readers be warned...his approach also unloads both barrels and leaves you wide-eyed. (I particularly loved his commentary on the concept of "accountability". And I'll leave it at that...no spoilers here.)
Think you're mature enough in your faith to take in what you need rather than just what you want? I triple-dog-dare you to read this one.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Craig Thompson on October 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Possibly. I was surprised at how well the author describes how modern American churches seem to forget the things Jesus taught about how we are to treat each other (each other meaning "everyone"). I have my own horror stories of how grace has been drowned by "Christians" doing the "right thing" rather than what Jesus requires. I think the best chapter in the book is the one of the author's relationship (established after Haggard's Fall) with Ted Haggard. I've seen plenty of examples of Christians eating their own during my 30 years as a Christ Follower, and have stuck my neck out many times in opposition to the scripture-twisting bullies who promote it (so much so that my friends often joke that I will end up being stoned or burnt at the stake).

But when I read that chapter, I realized that I have a long ways to go in the extending grace to others department. Like some of the folks in the book, I believed that Haggard could no longer be of use to God, that redemption was only partially possible for someone like him (as if it was my job to decide such things rather than God).

Well thank The Lord that His Grace is His to give and doesn't need the approval of fallible legalistic men like me. This book really made me think and search my soul concerning my walk with Christ. And isn't that what books like this are supposed to do?

I would recommend this book to anyone who has ever had their salvation questioned because of a political opinion, who has ever heard "don't you believe the Bible" used to justify something that hurts people, who goes to church that seems to have forgotten that those who have experienced God's grace should be the first to extend it to others.

But I especially recommend it to those of us who believed we have arrived, who's act is together, who's doctrine is right, who know they are the sheep of Matthew 25:31-46 and not the goats. They might be surprised.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By BallardS on July 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Cheshire has great understanding of how Christians are perceived-especially if unfavorably. What a gift, to be able to reflect on one self, find one's flaws and then create solutions for improvement.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mike Glenn on September 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Loved the book, could Identify as a former pastor, hilarious, honest writing about the B.S. we have all gone through in the institutional church. The difference is that Mike has taken a mediatorial approach. He acknowledges what is wrong and suggests remedies. Although over simplified for me, the book at least honestly admits to the ineffectiveness and torture of modern day Christianity and ;oints to what the real thing should look like. Especially enjoyed the sections dealing with Ted Haggard and pointing out the hypocrisy and fear in the status quo, it was refreshing and made me think to myself that Mike is the kind of guy I would like to have a beer with. His attempt to reconcile those who have left the IC for simple church or no church and have them come under IC again shows a misunderstanding of the hearts, motives and revelation of many of the people I have met and who I am myself. Not the forum to get into the whole heirarchy thing, i.e.Minister/Laity or role of shepherd in the fivefold ministry etc., but the author has the assumption all the way through that we all should agree that the pastor is a valid authority in a believer's life and that is not true for many believers. We share the kingdom, Christ builds the church and it is not man made. Having said all that, I admire the integrity and guts it took to write the book and it is certainly a step in the right direction. The revelation of grace and our own death changes everything.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Faith Ripple on July 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This book will definitely have you laughing in the midst of tears. As Christians, we are called to love one another but in the light of recent "tough-love" teaching it becomes easier to condemn and ostracize the fallen. This book definitely gets to the heart of What Would Jesus (really) do and makes the reader consider how he or she will do it differently.
Michael has a very straight-forward way of getting to the heart of a matter all while making you laugh through the pain of realizing we need to "do" church different if we are to be relevant to this next generation. Read this book, let it change you from the inside out then send the revolution forward!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CFMonzon on July 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Every once in a while a book comes along and punches you in face. That was "How to Knock Over a 7-Eleven and Other Ministry Training." After reading that book, there was just no going back to doing business, namely ministry, as usual.

Then, another book comes along and follows up the first punch with a one two combination. That book is "Why We Eat Our Own." I've been around the church for a long time and I haven't heard anyone articulate the highs and lows with such clarity and brutal honesty as Micheal Cheshire.

With the candor and transparency of Philip Yancey, Micheal leads the reader through a myriad of situations and circumstances that we in Christendom seldom discuss publicly. From the scandal of radical "raw grace" with respect to the restoration of leaders that have had moral failures, similar to what we read about in the red letters of the gospels, to how some church leaders put value on people primarily for the content of their checkbook as opposed to the content of their character. Micheal also touches on gossip, unforgiveness, and legalism as they pertain to the local church.

Admittedly, Michael doesn't claim to have all the answers, but he isn't scared to ask the tough questions. He writes, "When we all start rethinking things and asking the hard questions, maybe we will actually learn from our missteps."

"Why We Eat Our Own" forces the reader to engage in self-analysis through the lens of Scripture, which for me, led to some conviction. I've been guilty of being overly judgmental and throwing a leader, preacher and/or partitioner under the bus on more than one occasion.
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