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Widow's Journey: A Return to the Loving Self Paperback – September 1, 1991


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (P) (September 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805018379
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805018370
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #852,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The widow of renowned cellist Leonard Rose, who died in 1984, universalizes the experience of a spouse's bereavement in this self-help book. When her 20-year marriage was ended by death, Rose had difficulty in rediscovering her own identity. Following her experience in a support group of similarly mourning men and women, she resumed her work as a psychotherapist. One of Rose's tenets is that such sharing reduces the survivor's feelings of being alone and unique in grief. In addition to her own story, she offers vignettes of her clients and paths they took to restructuring their lives after the death of a spouse. The author, now remarried, addresses the problems of survivorship with forthright advice and practical suggestions to "make widowhood a little more bearable."
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Since women tend to live longer than men, it is likely that at some time a woman will have to face the sorrows and problems of becoming a widow. After the death of her husband, cellist Leonard Rose, psychotherapist Xenia Rose found herself confused, depressed, and totally alone. Only by joining group therapy sessions with other widows and by counseling recently widowed patients did Rose realize that her feelings were universal. In quiet yet forceful prose she discusses how to cope with the emotional pain, how to face changing social relationships, and how to move forward with one's life. She emphasizes that time heals sorrows and that happiness is possible again. Unlike many widows who suffer financial hardships or suddenly become single parents, Rose had a career and no children; therefore, her book will not be as meaningful to those who address these concerns daily. For larger collections.
- Ilse Heidman Ali, Motlow State Community Coll., Tullahoma, Tenn.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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