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WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange's War on Secrecy Paperback – Bargain Price, February 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (February 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 161039061X
  • ASIN: B0057D9LJG
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,096,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Mediaite, February 5, 2011
“While [The Guardian’s] rendition of experience does not fail to leave out the requisite depiction of Assange as overbearing and paranoid, the overall tone of the story, rather than vengeful, is surprisingly self-effacing.”

TechCrunch, February 12, 2011
“You can imagine, then, how delighted I was to receive a copy of the Guardian’s new crash-published Wikileaks book and discover that it was all the things I wanted from the Times’ book. And more… Indeed, while ‘Wikileaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War On Secrecy’ is many things – a thriller, a story of international diplomacy, a tale of greed and ambition and double-crosses; a comedy, a tragedy – above all it’s a manifesto for the future of professional journalism…If Wikileaks is this generation’s Watergate, then ‘Wikileaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War on Secrecy’ might well prove to be its All The President’s Men; educating a whole new generation of would-be reporters on the power and importance of the professional press.”
 
MacLean’s, March 1, 2011
“Leigh’s portrait of the WikiLeaks founder is at once affectionate and damning—a dry-eyed examination of the way celebrity can pervert a burgeoning ego.”

Eurasian Review
, February 4, 2011
“The novelistic lens serves an important purpose by painting a richer, more three-dimensional portrait of the people behind WikiLeaks and the controversies in which they became embroiled.”
 
Kaietur News, March 6, 2011
“Fantastic… a complicated story of the relationship between a man who is a fanatical political activist (Assange) with no formal journalistic training and no background in the media, and a group of esteemed, famous professional media practitioners.”
 
Irish Independent, March 19, 2011
“In unraveling the murky details, the book has also provided a rip-roaring narrative of secrets, tantrums, technological wizardry, personal betrayal and vengeance.”

The American Prospect, June, 2011
“The best overview of the story as it stood in early 2011 is WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange's War on Secrecy…This is a gripping, spy-novel-paced recounting of how WikiLeaks, the Guardian, and the other major organizations managed a first-of-its-kind global news-breaking collaboration.”

About the Author

DAVID LEIGH is a British journalist, author, editor, and Anthony Sampson Professor of Reporting in the journalism department at City University London. He has been a prominent investigative journalist since the 1970s and is currently investigations editor of the Guardian. He was educated at Nottingham High School and King's College, Cambridge, receiving a research degree from Cambridge in 1968. He was a journalist for the Scotsman, Times, and Guardian (UK) and a Laurence Stern fellow at the Washington Post in 1980. From 1980, he was chief investigative reporter at the Observer.

LUKE HARDING is the Guardian's Moscow correspondent. He was previously the Guardian's South Asia correspondent in New Delhi and has reported for the paper from Afghanistan and Iraq. --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

Maybe he is right and no-one was hurt but that sounds like wishful thinking.
John Fitzpatrick
What one notices immediately is the general tone of these writings, not only devoid of any sympathy for the subject, but frankly bilious.
Olga Fedina
In today’s “selfie” age, it’s not enough that the news is news but the process of getting the news has become news itself.
SLIMJIM

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 97 people found the following review helpful By Olga Fedina on February 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
As a member of the public who is following the Wikileaks drama (disinterested, but not dispassionate), I would like to say a few words about The Guardian journalists writings on Assange.

What one notices immediately is the general tone of these writings, not only devoid of any sympathy for the subject, but frankly bilious. Leaving you with an unpleasant taste in your mouth, this tone makes you slightly suspicious as for the authors' motivations and impartiality. It would also disappoint anyone hoping to get an insight into the "enigmatic" Wikileak's founder's human qualities. In fact, the way Julian Assange is presented throughout the book is not as a human at all, but rather as some exotic animal who needs to be constantly "managed" (and is now caged and can be poked at safely). Those few little human interest details about his childhood and youth included in the book can be easily searched for on the Internet (where the authors probably found them).

More than characterising its subject, this book characterises the media world. You do not get any sense of gratitude or recognition from The Guardian for Wikileaks giving it the biggest news stories of the last few decades, on a scale unimaginable to the Guardian's team of "investigative journalists". (Taking on Jonathan Aitken is not quite the same as taking on the Pentagon and the US government). There is no gratitude either for Julian Assange's hard work in taking the physical risks and psychological pressure for getting those news stories out. There is no sense of solidarity with Wikileaks, the organisation that essentially is serving the same purpose as any good newspaper should serve: getting the truth out.
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36 of 44 people found the following review helpful By marcosparco on May 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
David Leigh for anyone who has followed the Wikileaks story is someone who has in rather despicable fashion exploited the mass of information provided by Julian Assange and Wikileaks for his personal and his newspaper's gain, while at the same time being very instrumental in denigrating both Assange, Wikileaks and indirectly (IF he is the source) Bradley Manning. For people who want a more truthful account follow the articles by Israel Shamir in "CounterPunch" for instance. Leigh like his fellow manipulator, exploiter, and denigrator, NYT editor Bill Keller, loves profiting from the information provided (at great personal risk, and with almost heroic efforts in the face of vicious, totalitarian, no-holds-barred persecution by authorities in the US Empire and its proconsular hangers on the EU and other countries, by Assange and Wikileaks). This book is simply the product of an author who started with those goals in mind. So it is nothing resembling either a true, fair, balanced, or factual account. It is an extended smear intended to benefit Leigh and the "Guardian" while selling Assange and Wikileaks down the river. Read John Pilger's assessments and accounts of David Leigh and this book as well to get a better idea of what is going on. Daniel Domscheit Berg is another similar sort of individual who has smeared Wikileaks and Assange with the same goal of pursuing personal profit and 'glory' at the expense of the group's enterprise.
Finally do NOT purchase the book from this site in any case, since they also were totally complicit in the totalitarian witch-hunt against Assange and Wikileaks, denying them hosting services, and therefore (like the financial companies) basically voluntarily acting in the illegal ways the US Empire requested of them.
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Format: Paperback
"Wikileaks: Inside Julian Assange's War on Secrecy" is The Guardian's contribution to the narrative of Wikileaks that has emerged in the popular press since the release of "Cablegate" in December 2010. It is written primarily by The Guardian's investigations editor David Leigh and journalist Luke Harding, with a reasoned introduction by editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger. Leigh claims that he and Harding wrote the book in 3 weeks, which makes them officially hacks, with all the breathless hyperbole and looseness with fact that the term implies. But I'm impressed. This is a page-turner and a very readable account of The Guardian's collaboration with Wikileaks and 4 other news agencies on the release of the Afghan and Iraq War Logs and the US State Department cables in 2010.

The authors begin with some background: sympathetic chapters on Pfc. Bradley Manning, who is alleged to have leaked the data from the United States' SIPRNet, Julian Assange, and the evolution of Wikileaks, from the organization's first coup in 2007, when it published a report on Daniel Arap Moi's corruption in Kenya. Then it is to Norway, March 2010, when The Guardian had its first face-to-face contact with Assange. He showed David Leigh the Apache helicopter video that would later be known as "Collateral Murder". There is an exciting account of Nick Davies' meeting with Assange that produced the collaboration between Wikileaks, The Guardian, and, ultimately, other news agencies, leading to the global furor we are still experiencing 4 months after Cablegate.
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