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  • Wild Secrets: Aquatic Animals (Institutions)
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Wild Secrets: Aquatic Animals (Institutions)


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Join the Wild Secrets team on their global expeditions featuring fascinating underwater creatures in some of the most hidden and beautiful ocean habitats. Sperm Whales, Parrot Fish, Bottlenose Dolphins and the 'missing link' Super Snail are all discovered and presented with in depth views on this four part DVD. This highly acclaimed wildlife documentary series reveals the struggle to survive not only against natural predators and harsh environments but also the encroaching presence of mankind.

This DVD includes four episodes from the Wild Secrets series:

Part One - Sperm Whale: Deep Ocean Travelers
Made famous by the novel Moby Dick, the sperm whale is the species most of us associate with the word "whale". But surprisingly, this most familiar of all whales is something of a mystery mammal. Its deep diving and oceanic way of life has made it extremely hard to study. But once a year, sperm whales gather to mate off the coast of Dominica, in the warm shallow waters of the Caribbean Sea. We go underwater during mating season and discover some of the sexual secrets of this mysterious deep ocean traveler.

Part Two - Parrot Fish: The Living Sand Factory
Each and every grain of sand is made by natural forces, by the actions of winds, waves and volcanoes. But coral sand has a unique life history; it's the only sand on the planet that is made by fish. The industrious parrot fish makes sand every minute of the day and that amounts to nearly one ton per fish per year. The largest parrot fish is responsible for more than half the sand on some coral atolls - a remarkable legacy for any fish.

Part Three - Bottlenose Dolphin: Fishing with Humans
Across centuries and continents there have been stories of dolphins and humans interacting, but none is as remarkable as the story of cooperation between the bottlenose dolphins and the fishermen of Laguna, Brazil. Using echolocation the dolphins drive shoals of fish into the nets. The fishermen get much better hauls and the dolphins get a meal of escaping fish. It's a technique that has been passed down through the generations. About 20 dolphins currently fish with the humans, in a fishing partnership that dates back nearly 200 years.

Part Four - Evolution of the Super Snail
Australian scientist Mark Gordon goes in search of the missing link between the squid and the octopus. In this program we peer into the private lives of cephalopods: squids, octopuses, cuttlefish and the mysterious chambered nautilus. Some octopuses have arms two meters long; the smallest squid has a whole body no longer than 20 millimeters. These highly evolved shellfish display an incredible variety of behavior using color-change, highly maneuverable arms, a water jet-propulsion system and a large brain. Mark achieves his goal among some very unusual squids living at the bottom of the ocean.

(c) 2003 & 2004 NHK - All Rights Reserved
NTSC Widescreen - 105 minutes - Not Available for Sale in Japan

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