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Wild edibles of Missouri Paperback – 1995


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Paperback, 1995
$84.67 $43.46
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Missouri Dept. of Conservation; 2nd edition (1995)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006R2FDM
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,385,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
83%
4 star
17%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 6 customer reviews
Not photos but proper botanical illustrations!
Jeanette R
Very helpful reference book for knowing what edible plants are available for everyday use or for something to eat during an emergency.
Phoenix
If there is even the slightest doubt in your mind, DON'T EAT IT!
D. Blankenship

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
Wild Edibles of Missouri by Jan Phillips and published by the Missouri Conservation Commission, is a very useful little guide for those who are interested in such things. Each plant addressed and assessed by the author is accompanied by a very well done black and white drawing. In addition to this, there are around fifty color plates of some of these plants. Both drawings and color plates are very well done. The author has given us a very useable text, describing the plant, its habitat, usage, and personal notes from the author as to usage and harvesting time and techniques.

This book, when used, needs to be read quite carefully, and I certainly suggest that you use other works to supplement it. While this actual work as a whole is quite good, this is an area where you certainly should not make any mistakes. Some, and indeed most, of the plants featured here are quite edible, but on the other hand, most can make you quite ill if they are not prepared correctly, harvested at the wrong time or if the wrong part of the plant is used or if too much of the plant is eaten. The author, thank goodness, has emphasized this, but it is sort of human nature to read and see more or less what you want to see...sort of wishful thinking. I have personally been acquainted wiht a number of people who have gotten into big trouble this way. Use this book, but, as I said, read carefully and don't take chances. If there is even the slightest doubt in your mind, DON'T EAT IT! Better yet, if you harvest from the wild, it is best to start, go and be taught by and with someone who absolutely knows what they are doing. I have been dealing with these plants, and eating them, for well over fifty years now.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Cassie on February 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is free in PDF format on the Missouri Dept of Conservation website. Much better than paying $100 for it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Virginia Allain on September 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
Many are familiar with blackberries, pawpaws, and black walnuts as tasty wild foods. This book covers those and less known edibles like goatsbeard (cook the root like a potato) or honewort (cook the stems like asparagus, put the leaves in a salad).

This excellent guide shows a sketch of each plant with its flowers or berries or nuts. It gives the species, flowering dates, a description, habitat, location in the state, time to collect it, and its uses.

Three or four paragraphs supplement that info with the author's own experience using the plant. In some cases she gives specific amounts such as for making jam from ground cherry. Other times she is brief such as "put the raw early leaves of hollyhock in a tossed salad."

Forty-seven plants get full color paintings by the author. Seventeen plants are listed in a warning section as dangerous or poisonous (wild ginger, pokeweed, etc.). A few recipes (soup, fritter, wild edible biscuits) are attached at the end. The index sorts the edibles by type of use (pies, liquers, teas, salads, etc.)
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