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Wilderness Mass Market Paperback – January 26, 2010


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Voyager (January 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380806460
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380806461
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,986,011 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Keeper of a terrible secret and resigned to a fate some might regard as worse than death, Alice White lives alone, has no friends and permits herself human contact only in the arms of men she picks up for one-night stands. Once a month, at the full moon, Alice locks herself inside her basement and turns into a wolf. In this riveting debut, Danvers gives suspension of disbelief a whole new meaning. Never for an instant does the reader doubt Alice's plight nor fail to empathize with her dilemma: Should she , for the first time in her life, risk loving someone enough to share the secret with him? She wants desperately to end her self-imposed isolation but fears the awful truth will drive Erik Summers away. Wildlife biologist Summers, a man with a keen sensitivity to the anmial world, seems the ideal counterpart for the troubled Alice. Complicating these already dark matters still further are Summer's ex-wife, who wants him back, and Alice's psychiatrist, who has fallen in love with her. Human complications notwithstanding, it is when we are with Alice the wolf--prowling her den, pawing the floor, confined, condemned, yet unmistakably alive--that this provocative novel is at its sensuous, page-turning best. 50,000 first printing; $50,000 ad/promo; Literary Guild alternate; paperback rights to Pocket Books; film option to Pathe Entertainment.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Beware the publisher's hype: it makes this lovely novel sound ridiculous. Primarily a story about the trials of love, Wilderness has as its heroine Alice White, a woman who has kept herself shut off emotionally because of a shameful secret. When she meets Erik, they fall in love and she decides to tell him who she really is--a werewolf. Of course he doesn't believe her, and their resulting soul-searching is painful to share. Alice's main concern was to be believed and, more important, accepted; so at Erik's rejection she decides actively to explore her animal half. Matters are complicated by Alice's inept psychiatrist and by Erik's ex-wife, who decides at this crucial time that she wants him back. Eventually, Erik realizes he loves Alice. The characters are all well rounded; we even get a glimpse of the pompous psychiatrist's empty home life. In no way a horror story, this book is as good as the publisher claims, but it is a pity that the promotion even mentions the "werewolf" theme. Highly recommended. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/91.
-A.M.B. Amantia, Population Crisis Committee Lib., Washington, D.C.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

I didn't even find the romance sections interesting or sexy.
RPK
It's one of those books I've recommended many times over to anyone who loves to read and anyone who wants to write supernatural fiction.
Raven Grimaldi
That is, until she meets Erik, her college course advisor, and against her better judgment, falls deeply in love with him.
Louis N. Gruber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Louis N. Gruber VINE VOICE on August 24, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a most amazing book, beginning with the premise that Alice White, a beautiful and talented young lady, turns into a wolf once a month like clockwork. Naturally this complicates her life and forces her into a lonely existence of superficial relationships. That is, until she meets Erik, her college course advisor, and against her better judgment, falls deeply in love with him. He is the first man she has ever loved, but what will he say when she tells him the lycanthropic truth? This is a love story that really gets complicated. And Erik's ex-wife Debra is trying to win him back. And her psychiatrist, who secretly lusts for her, is making things even more difficult.
Well, this was a book I could not put down. It is well written, wise and insightful. Danvers makes the strange premise of the book somehow believable. You begin to wonder--well, what if? After all, don't we all have an animal nature, a dark side that we scarcely know? The only part of the book I found hard to believe was the unprofessional behavior of the psychiatrist.
So, run out to the woods and howl--no, no--buy this book and read it, nooooooow!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By F. J. Harvey on May 23, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Vampires tend to take centre stage in the majority of horror novels I see on my library and bookstore shelves these days,while novels about lycanthropes tend to trail a long way behind in both quality and quantity.I suspect it is all down to sensuality and sex, with vampires being inherently more erotic than werewolves whose destruction of their prey tends to be coarse and unrefined compared to the vampire's seductiveness and refined elegance."Wildernes"is that rarity-a tale of werewolves that is cool in tone and saturated with a delicate sensuality that is quite erotic--Anne Rice without the super saturated langauage she mistakenly feels is classy.
It is in essence a romantic and languidly elegant love story whose heroine,"Alice White"is a werewolf who in her childhood tore out the throat of a would be rapist.Now an adult she works in a travel agency,takes courses at the local University and manages to maintain her emotional distance from the world while enjoying an active sex life.She keeps her transformations into
werewolfdom a secret by a self-imposed solitude at key times.She then meets and falls in love with "Erik Summers"a biologist from the University and confides in him.Understandably he is sceptical ,thinking her in need of therapy.Alice leaves him and vanishes into the wilderness where he pursues her
The wilderness of the title is not simply the wilds of nature but also a reference to the untamed and hostile areas of the human mind and soul When love is involved ,and only when love is involved, can science and the forces which science cannot explain come to live together.This seems to be the message to this complelling book .It is a work low in gore and viscerality and its tone is cerebral and detached avoiding the usual genre cliches
Enjoyable and worth the time of anyone who likes the quiet horror of such as Grant and Wright
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kelly (Fantasy Literature) VINE VOICE on April 15, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Wilderness, originally published in 1991, has recently been rereleased. I presume it's because tales of lycanthropy are all the rage at the moment. Wilderness is an excellent novel and I'm thrilled that it will get the chance to reach new readers -- myself included, as I hadn't heard of it until the new edition popped up on shelves -- and at the same time, I hope it will find its way to readers who will appreciate it for what it is rather than wishing it were something else. I worry that the new cover art will lead readers to expect a novel more in line with the books of Laurell K. Hamilton. If you're looking for the latest lycanthropic smut-and-gore fest, Wilderness is not it.

So what is it? It's a love story, but it's not a "romance novel" and doesn't adhere to all of the conventions of that genre. It's a werewolf story, but it's not horror. It's deeply romantic and intensely psychological. I want to call it contemplative, but that might give the impression that it's long and slow-paced, and Wilderness is neither. When trying to think of another novel to compare it to, the closest I could think of was another 1991 release, Megan Lindholm/Robin Hobb's Cloven Hooves. While Wilderness is less melancholy than Cloven Hooves, both novels explore the idea of the "wild," authentic self vs. the "tame," conventional self. And both writers share a talent for describing the beauties of nature.

We meet Alice White, a 32-year-old woman who happens to be a werewolf. She has been a loner since adolescence, afraid to reveal her true self to anyone and afraid of hurting people during her monthly transformations.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Legends of werewolves, like those of vampires, have long existed. Twentieth century cinema revived interest in these lycanthropes, with films like Michael Landon's "I Was A Teenage Werewolf," "An American Werewolf In London," and Jack Nicholson's "Wolf," among others. Popular fiction has romanticized and/or demonized these mythical creatures who look and act human but turn into wolves at the full moon. Author Dennis Danvers has given readers a new take on this old tale with his novel, "Wilderness."

Alice White, is an intelligent, exotically attractive woman in her early thirties. She is a loner, and has been since the age of twelve, which is when she first changed into a wolf during the full moon. Unlike fictional accounts of werewolves, Alice's transformation does not endow her with human qualities. She becomes a full-fledged wolf in every way, and never fully remembers her experiences as a wild animal when she changes back into human form. Nor does she recall what it is like to be Alice when she is a wolf, although the wolf is aware of "the girl," who is her other self. Her secret governs her existence. She has made it a point not to form close relationships with friends or lovers, although she yearns for normalcy and an end to her isolation and terrible loneliness. She is not as afraid of discovery as she is of hurting someone, due to a violent incident she was once involved in. So, she barricades herself in her basement at the beginning of each lunar cycle.

College biology professor Erik Summers is Alice's new neighbor and very much attuned to the natural world and animals. Erik and Alice felt an intense mutual attraction since they first met. The attraction is more than just physical. There is a sense of deep affinity between them.
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